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The OAH Distinguished Lectureship Program


Printable Listing of OAH Distinguished Lecturers

Below is a comprehensive list of OAH Distinguished Lecturers. An asterisk (*) denotes that the speaker joined the program in 2014–2015.

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A

Catherine Allgor

Huntington Library

Catherine Allgor is the Nadine and Robert A. Skotheim Director of Education at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Her first book, Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government (2000), won the James H. Broussard First Book Prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic after having garnered the OAH Lerner-Scott Dissertation Prize in its original form. She is also the author of Dolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity (2012) and A Perfect Union: Dolley Madison and the Creation of the American Nation (2006), and the editor of The Queen of America: Mary Cutts’s Life of Dolley Madison (2012). She was appointed by President Obama to the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation. Before joining the Huntington staff, Allgor taught at the University of California Riverside, Claremont McKenna College, Harvard University, and Simmons College, and she began her career as an actor and interpreter at Plimoth Plantation.

  • Dolley Madison and the Creation of the American Nation
  • Dolley Madison: A Case Study of Female Leadership in the Early Republic
  • Mrs. Madison's War: Dolley Madison and the War of 1812
  • Remembering the Ladies in the Story of the Founding
  • Society Ladies and Political Parties: A Study in American Women's History
  • What is this Thing Called "Gender"?

Gar Alperovitz

University of Maryland, College Park

Gar Alperovitz is the Lionel R. Bauman Professor of Political Economy at the University of Maryland, College Park, and a cofounder of the Democracy Collaborative. He has written on nuclear weapons and the origins of the Cold War and on new possibilities for systemic change in advanced societies. His books include Atomic Diplomacy: Hiroshima and Potsdam (1965), The Decision To Use The Atomic Bomb (1995), and America Beyond Capitalism: Reclaiming Our Wealth, Our Liberty and Our Democracy (2005, reissued with extended introduction in 2011). A coauthor of Unjust Deserts (2008), which deals with the socially created and inherited sources of wealth and the implications for a new theory of distribution, he is the author most recently of What Then Must We Do? (2013), a book about paths to the democratization of wealth and systemic change.

  • Beyond Capitalism and Socialism: The Emerging Shape of the Next System
  • New Directions in Worker and Community
  • Socially Created Wealth and Its Distribution and Maldistribution
  • The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb
  • The New Economy Movement
  • The Oddities of American History and the Possibility of Systemic Change in the Twenty-first Century
  • The Quietly Developing Democratization of Wealth

Luis Alvarez

University of California, San Diego

Luis Alvarez is an associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. His research and teaching interests include comparative race and ethnicity, popular culture, and social movements in the history of Chicanas/os, Latinas/os, African Americans, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. He is the author of The Power of the Zoot: Youth Culture and Resistance during World War II (2008) and a coeditor of Another University Is Possible (2010). He is currently working on two books, “Everyday Utopia: Popular Culture and the Politics of the Possible,” an investigation of pop culture and social movements in the Americas since World War II, and “Reggae Rhythms in Dignity’s Diaspora,” which explores the cultural politics of reggae music and globalization. He has won numerous awards for research and teaching, including the Teaching Excellence Award from the University of Houston and fellowships from the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University, the Ford Foundation, the University of California Office of the President, and the Institute for Humanities Research at Arizona State University.

  • Everyday Utopia: Pop Culture, Social Movements, and the Politics of the Possible
  • Latina/o Soldiering: Military Service and Ethnic Identity in World War II
  • Race and Popular Music in the 1950s
  • Race, Riots, and Violence in American History
  • The Power of the Zoot: Youth Culture and Resistance during World War II
  • Toward a Comparative and Relational Chicana/o Studies

Akhil Reed Amar

Yale Law School

Akhil Reed Amar is the Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University, where he teaches constitutional law at Yale College and Yale Law School. A former editor of the Yale Law Journal, he clerked for Judge Stephen Breyer on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit before joining the Yale faculty in 1985. He writes and speaks widely on constitutional issues and is the author of several books, including The Constitution and Criminal Procedure: First Principles (1997); The Bill of Rights: Creation and Reconstruction (1998), winner of the American Bar Association (ABA) Certificate of Merit and the Yale University Press Governors Award; America’s Constitution: A Biography (2005), winner of the ABA Silver Gavel Award; and America’s Unwritten Constitution: The Precedents and Principles We Live By (2012). An elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has also received the Federalist Society’s Paul M. Bator Award and the DeVane Medal, Yale’s highest award for teaching excellence.

  • Rules of Constitutional Interpretation
  • Separation of Powers
  • Slavery and the Constitution
  • The American Presidency (including the electoral college)
  • The Bill of Rights
  • The Constitutional Amendment Process
  • The Senate Filibuster
  • The Supreme Court

Fred Anderson

University of Colorado Boulder

Fred Anderson is a professor of history and the Director of Honors in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he has taught since 1983. He is the author or editor of five books, including Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766 (2000), which won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Mark Lynton History Prize. He is a coauthor, with Andrew Cayton, of The Dominion of War: Empire and Liberty in North America, 1500-2000 (2005). He and Cayton are currently writing “Imperial America, 1672-1764”, a volume in the Oxford History of the United States series.

  • Empire and Liberty in North American History
  • The Peace of Paris, 1763
  • The Seven Years' War and the Making of George Washington
  • The Significance of the Seven Years' War
  • War and Peace in American History

Virginia DeJohn Anderson

University of Colorado Boulder

Virginia Anderson has taught early American history at the University of Colorado, Boulder, since 1985. She is the author of New England’s Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century (1992) and Creatures of Empire: How Domestic Animals Transformed Early America (2004). She is also a coauthor of the textbook The American Journey (6th edition, 2011). Her new book project, “The Martyr and the Traitor: Moses Dunbar, Nathan Hale, and the American Revolution,” explores the personal as well as political transformations that shaped individual lives in unexpected ways as the Revolutionary crisis unfolded.

  • Nathan Hale: Sociability and Patriotism in the American Revolution
  • The Ordeal of Moses Dunbar, Connecticut Loyalist

Thomas G. Andrews

University of Colorado at Boulder

Thomas G. Andrews is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado at Boulder and specializes in the social and environmental history of the American West. His first book, Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War (2008), won six awards, including the Bancroft Prize. His next book, an environmental history of the Colorado headwaters region of Rocky Mountain National Park, will be published in fall 2015. He is now working on a book on human-animal relationships in U.S. history. He teaches a wide range of courses in environmental history, the history of the U.S. West, and other subjects, and is passionate about educating current and future history teachers.

  • Beasts of the Southern Wild: Tracking Non-Human Animals in Charles Ball's Slavery in the United States (1836)
  • Killing for Coal: Energy, Work, and Power in the Colorado Coalfield Wars of 1913-1914
  • The Nature of History: Work, Environment, and the Making of Hubert Howe Bancroft's Works
  • Vehicles of Resistance? Horses, Native Peoples, and Euroamerican Colonialism in the Greater North American Borderlands
  • Work and Nature: Reconciling Labor and Environmental History

Richard Aquila

Penn State University, Behrend College

Richard Aquila is a professor of history at Penn State University, Behrend College. He specializes in U.S. social and cultural history, particularly the American West, American Indians, popular culture, and recent America. His publications include the forthcoming book, "The Sagebrush Trail: Western Movies and Twentieth-Century America";Wanted Dead or Alive: The American West in Popular Culture (1996); Home Front Soldier: The Story of a G.I. and His Italian American Family During World War II (1999); That Old Time Rock and Roll: A Chronicle of An Era, 1954–63 (1989); and The Iroquois Restoration: Iroquois Diplomacy on the Colonial Frontier, 1701–1754 (1983, 1997). Aquila has also written, produced, and hosted numerous documentaries for npr. His weekly public history series, “Rock & Roll America,” was syndicated on npr and npr Worldwide.

  • "Into the Fire": September 11, Popular Music, and Public Memory
  • Rock 'n' Roll's Sixtieth Anniversary: The Birth of Rock 'n' Roll and 1950s America
  • The Adventures of Broncho Billy: The Mythic West, Cowboys, and Progressive America
  • The Great Train Robbery, or How Early Westerns Stole America's Heart
  • Trail of Freedom: Images of Native Americans in Popular Music

David Armitage

Harvard University

David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University. A prizewinning teacher and writer, he is the author of The Ideological Origins of the British Empire (2000), The Declaration of Independence: A Global History (2007), and Foundations of Modern International Thought (2013), and a coauthor, with Jo Guldi, of The History Manifesto (2014). He has also edited nine books, including The British Atlantic World, 1500–1800 (2nd edition, 2009), The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, 1760–1840 (2010), and Pacific Histories: Ocean, Land, Peoples (2014). He is currently working on a history of ideas of civil war from Rome to the present, and an edition of John Locke's colonial writings.

  • Civil War: A History in Ideas
  • Globalizing the Declaration of Independence
  • Horizons of History: Space, Time, and the Future of the Past
  • The American Revolution in Global Perspective
  • The History Manifesto
  • The International Turn in Intellectual History

Eric Arnesen

The George Washington University

Eric Arnesen specializes in the history of race, labor, and civil rights. The James R. Hoffa Professor of Labor History and associate dean for faculty affairs at The George Washington University, he is the author of two award-winning books—Brotherhoods of Color: Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality (2001) and Waterfront Workers of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Politics, 1863-1923 (1991)—as well as the author, editor, or coeditor of four other books. In addition to numerous scholarly articles, he has published regularly in the Chicago Tribune and his reviews and review essays have appeared in the New Republic, the Nation, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, Historically Speaking, and Dissent. He writes and edits regularly for several children's history magazines and currently codirects the Washington History Seminar at the Woodrow Wilson Center. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and Harvard's Charles Warren Center, he has also held the Distinguished Fulbright Chair at Uppsala University in Sweden and received the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism. He is completing a biography of the civil rights and labor leader A. Philip Randolph.

  • African American History, the Left, and Anticommunism
  • African Americans and the Great Migration
  • Civil Rights and the Cold War at Home
  • Myths of Solidarity: Race, the African American Labor Tradition, and the History of American Labor
  • The Challenges of Black Internationalism: Black Activists and the Cold War
  • The Divided Homefront: African American Politics and Protest during World War I and World War II
  • The Legacies of A. Philip Randolph: Civil Rights, Labor, and the New Black Politics

Stephen Aron

University of California, Los Angeles and Autry National Center

Stephen Aron, a professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the chair of the Autry Institute for the Study of the American West, is a specialist in frontier, borderland, and western American history. With appointments at a university and a museum, Aron seeks to bridge the divide between "academic" and "public" history. He is the author of How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay (1996), American Confluence: The Missouri Frontier from Borderland to Border State (2006), and American Wests: A Very Short Introduction (2014) and a coauthor of Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the Modern World from the Mongol Empire to the Present (4th edition, 2014). He is currently writing a book tentatively entitled "Can We All Just Get Along: An Alternative History of the American West."

  • Returning the West to the World
  • The Legacy of Concord in the American West
  • The Lives and Afterlives of Lewis and Clark
  • The Newest Western History
  • Who Do You Think You Are?

Gabriela F. Arredondo

University of California, Santa Cruz

Gabriela F. Arredondo is an associate professor in the Latin American and Latino studies department at University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity, and Nation, 1916-1939 (2008) and a coauthor of Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader (2003). Her teaching and research interests include comparative Latina/o histories, gender and racial formations, U.S. and Mexico histories, comparative immigration/migration, U.S. social history, and Chicana/o history.

  • Bridging Latin American and Latina/o Studies
  • Chicana Feminisms
  • Comparative Latina/o Histories
  • Critical Issues in Chicana/o History

Raymond O. Arsenault

University of South Florida, St. Petersburg

Raymond O. Arsenault is the John Hope Franklin Professor of Southern History at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg. The author of four prizewinning books on Southern history as well as the classic essay “The End of the Long Hot Summer,” Arsenault has written and lectured on a wide variety of topics related to civil rights and race, regional culture, and environmental history. His most recent books are The Sound of Freedom: Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert that Awakened America (2009) and Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice (2006). In 2011, the pbs/American Experience documentary “Freedom Riders,” directed by acclaimed filmmaker Stanley Nelson and based on Arsenault’s book, achieved national and international attention, winning three Emmy awards and numerous film festival honors.

  • Freedom Riders
  • Shadow Man: The Life and Times of Arthur Ashe
  • The End of the Long Hot Summer: The Air Conditioner and Southern Culture
  • The Folklore of Southern Demagoguery
  • The Public Storm: Hurricanes and the Environmental History of Modern America
  • The Sound of Freedom: Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert that Awakened America

Eric Avila

University of California, Los Angeles

Eric Avila is an urban and cultural historian of twentieth-century America, emphasizing the historical intersections of racial identity, urban space, and cultural representation. Since 1997, he has taught Chicano studies and history at the University of California, Los Angeles, and also is affiliated with the university’s department of urban planning. He is the author of Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Fear and Fantasy in Suburban Los Angeles (2004) and is The Folklore of the Freeway: Race and Revolt in the Modernist City (2014).

  • Latinos and American History
  • Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and the New American City
  • Race and the American City after World War II

Edward L. Ayers

University of Richmond

Edward L. Ayers is the president and a professor of history at the University of Richmond. A historian of the American South, Ayers has written and edited ten books, including The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction (1992) and In the Presence of Mine Enemies: War in the Heart of America, 1859-1863 (2003), winner of the Bancroft and Beveridge Prizes. An early proponent of digital history with The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War, Ayers continues to work in the field, focusing on visualization of social processes across space and time. He is also a cohost, with Brian Balogh and Peter Onuf, of the radio show BackStory with the American History Guys. He received a 2012 National Humanities Medal, awarded by President Barack Obama, for his work in making history widely accessible and available.

  • Making Sense of the Civil War
  • Seeing History: Experiments in Digital History

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Bob Bain

University of MIchigan

Bob Bain is an associate professor of history education at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the School of Education and history department. A veteran high school history teacher and university professor, Bain studies teaching and learning of history across a variety of instructional settings, including classrooms, museums, and with technology. His research focuses on students learning history and teachers learning to teach history. His recent publications include “‘They Thought the World Was Flat?’ Principles in Teaching High School History” in How Students Learn: History, Math, and Science in the Classroom (2005) and “Rounding Up Unusual Suspects: Facing Authority Hidden the History Classroom” in Teachers College Record. Bain is also a primary investigator on the Big History Project, focusing on pedagogy, literacy, and student learning.

  • History Teaching as Literate Practice, or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Common Core
  • More than "Doing History": The Practice of "Doing" History Teaching
  • Seeing Beyond the Oceans: The Instructional Challenges of History in Global Context
  • Teaching the History of Everything: Reports from Big History
  • Where Are the Kids? Students as Historical Thinkers

James M. Banner Jr.

Independent historian

James M. Banner Jr. is an independent historian in Washington, D.C. The founding director of the History News Service as well as a cofounder of the National History Center, he is now a historian in residence in the history department of American University. Most recently, Banner is a coeditor of Becoming Historians (2009) and the author of Being a Historian: An Introduction to the Professional World of History (2012). His play, “Good and Faithful Servants,” adapted from the correspondence between John and Abigail Adams and Thomas Jefferson, is under development, and he is currently writing a book about revisionist history.

  • Revisionist History: What It Is, Why We Have It
  • What It Means to Be a Historian Today

Juliana Barr

University of Florida

Juliana Barr is Jessie Ball DuPont-Magid Professor and an associate professor of history at the University of Florida. Her first book, Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands (2007), received six book awards including a Berkshire Conference of Women Historians prize for the best book in women’s history and the Southern Historical Association’s Charles S. Sydnor Award. Her research and teaching focus on early America, American Indians, and women, especially the role of Indian women in native diplomacy; Indian enslavement; intersections of European colonialism and indigenous sovereignty; and regional, continental, and hemispheric models for understanding the history of the early Americas.

  • "Women in Blue": Spanish Saints or Indian Demons of the Southwest
  • Finding Sacajawea in the Histories of the American West
  • Geographies of Power: Mapping Indian Borders in Early America
  • How Do You Get from Jamestown to Santa Fe? A Colonial Sun Belt
  • Reimagining New World Encounters: A View from the American West
  • When the Virgin Mary Came, the Goddess Zacado Stayed Put: Indian Views of New World Encounters

Mia Bay

Rutgers University

Mia Bay is a professor of history at Rutgers University, where she directs the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity. She is the author of The White Image in the Black Mind: African-American Ideas About White People 1830-1925 (2000) and To Tell the Truth Freely: The Life of Ida B. Wells (2009). She is a coauthor, with Waldo E. Martin and Deborah Gray White, of Freedom on My Mind: A History of African Americans, With Documents (2012). She is currently completing a book on African American ideas about Thomas Jefferson and is researching a new project on the social history of segregated transportation.

  • "If Iola was a Man": Gender, Politics, and Pubic Protest in the Life of Ida B. Wells
  • "The Ambidexter Philosopher": Thomas Jefferson in Free Black Political Thought
  • Traveling Black, Buying Black: Race on the Road during the Jim Crow Era
  • Using the Internet to Teach African American History

New in 2013 2014Douglas C. Baynton *

University of Iowa

Douglas C. Baynton is an associate professor of history at the University of Iowa, where he also teaches courses on deaf studies for the American Sign Language program. He is the author of Forbidden Signs: American Culture and the Campaign against Sign Language (1996), a cultural history of debates over American Sign Language and the meaning of deafness. With Jack R. Gannon and Jean Lindquist Bergey, he is a coauthor of Through Deaf Eyes: A Photographic History of an American Community (2007), an exploration of American history from the perspective of the deaf community and the companion to a PBS documentary film. He is currently writing a book on the concept of "defective persons" in American immigration policy since the nineteenth century.

  • Handicapped in the Race for Life: Time and Disability in the Age of Eugenics
  • Defectives in the Land: Disability and American Immigration Policy, 1882-1924
  • Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History
  • The Curious Death of Sign Language Studies in the Nineteenth Century

Sven Beckert

Harvard University

Sven Beckert is the Laird Bell Professor of American History at Harvard University. His research and teaching focus on the history of the United States in the nineteenth century with a particular emphasis on the history of capitalism, including its economic, social, political, and transnational dimensions. His publications have focused on the nineteenth-century American bourgeoisie, labor, democracy, and the global history of capitalism. He cochairs Harvard’s Program on the Study of Capitalism as well as an international study group on global history and has coorganized a series of conferences on the history of capitalism.

  • Democracy in the Age of Capital
  • The Empire of Cotton: A Global History

New in 2013 2014Katherine Benton-Cohen *

Georgetown University

Katherine Benton-Cohen is an associate professor of history at Georgetown University and previously taught at Louisiana State University. An Arizona native, she is the author of Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands (2009) and is currently writing a book about the largest study of immigrants in American history, the Dillingham Commission of 1907–1911, and its role in shaping immigration as a public policy problem. She has received many grants and awards, including from the Woodrow Wilson Center, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Coordinating Council for Women in History, and the National History Center. She teaches college courses in the history of women, race, immigration and the American West, and enjoys working with teachers and K-12 students as well.

  • The Invention of Immigration as a Policy Problem
  • What's the Matter with Arizona, and What Isn't
  • The Bisbee Deportation of 1917
  • Jewish Lobbyists and Immigration Policy in the Early Twentieth Century

Michael A. Bernstein

Tulane University

Michael A. Bernstein is the senior vice president for academic affairs and provost of Tulane University where he also serves as a professor of history and economics. A recipient of a Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of California-San Diego, where he previously taught for almost two decades, his research and teaching interests focus on the economic and political history of the United States, macroeconomic theory, industrial organization economics, and the history of economic theory. His publications explore the connections between political and economic processes in modern industrial societies as well as the interaction of economic knowledge and professional expertise with those processes as a whole. Along with numerous articles and anthology chapters, Bernstein has published four volumes, including, most recently, A Perilous Progress: Economists and Public Purpose in Twentieth-Century America (2001).

  • Economists, Economic Thought, and Public Policy in the Modern Age
  • The American Economy Between the World Wars of the Twentieth Century
  • The Great Depression in American Capitalism
  • The Legacies of the Cold War and the Contemporary American Economy
  • Understanding American Economic Decline: From World War II to the Present

Shana Bernstein

Northwestern University

Shana Bernstein is a visiting associate professor of history at Northwestern University, where she teaches courses on race and ethnicity, immigration, health, and the American West. Her research emphasizes twentieth-century urban social reform movements. Her first book, Bridges of Reform: Interracial Civil Rights Activism in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles (2011), focuses on collaborative civil rights activism among Jewish, Mexican, African, and Japanese Americans in Los Angeles. She is currently working on a book exploring Progressive environmental justice campaigns in Chicago's working-class, immigrant neighborhoods.

  • Interracial Activism in the Los Angeles Community Service Organization: Linking the World War II and Civil Rights Eras
  • Nazis, Red-Baiting, and Civil Rights: Jewish Americans' Emergence as Interracial Activists in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles
  • The "Garbage Ladies" of the Settlements: Environmental Justice Reform in Progressive-Era Chicago

Daina Ramey Berry

University of Texas at Austin

Daina Ramey Berry is an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin and a specialist in the history of gender and slavery in the United States. She is the author of Swing the Sickle for the Harvest Is Ripe: Gender and Slavery in Antebellum Georgia (2007); editor-in-chief of Enslaved Women in America: An Encyclopedia (2012), winner of the American Library Association's RUSA Outstanding Reference Source; and a coeditor, with Leslie Harris, of Slavery and Freedom in Savannah (2014). Her current projects include an edited volume on sexuality and slavery and a book on the economic and social history of slave prices in the South.

  • Gender and Slavery in the United States
  • Slavery and the Value of Human Chattels
  • The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass
  • United States Slavery
  • Urban Slavery in Savannah

Stephen Berry

University of Georgia

Stephen Berry is Gregory Professor of the Civil War Era at the University of Georgia, where his teaching and writing focus on the war as a lived experience. He is particularly interested in how men, women, and families reacted to, were shaped by, and endured after the conflict transformed their lives. Berry is the author of House of Abraham: Lincoln and the Todds, A Family Divided by War (2007) and All That Makes a Man: Love and Ambition in the Civil War South (2003). His work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Mellon Foundation.

  • Becoming Great and Good: What We Lost In Abraham Lincoln
  • House of Abraham: Lincoln and the Todds, A Family Divided by War
  • The Civil War in Photographs
  • When Metal Meets Mettle: The Hard Realities of Civil War Soldiering

Martha Biondi

Northwestern University

Martha Biondi is a professor of African American studies and history at Northwestern University. Her research and teaching focus on twentieth-century African American history, with particular attention to grassroots activism, black political thought, gender, labor, and cities. She has written two major studies on the modern black freedom struggle. The first, To Stand and Fight: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City (2003), argues that the modern civil rights movement began in the urban North. That movement’s association with communist and other radical organizations made it vulnerable to Cold War repression and helps explain how it was subsequently “forgotten.” In The Black Revolution on Campus (2012) she demonstrates how the black student movement of the late 1960s also embraced controversial rhetoric and tactics and how it accelerated after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. The rise of open admissions, affirmative action, and black studies dramatically changed collegiate life and intellectual production in the United States. Moreover, the simultaneous fight to save historically black colleges from the threat of integration contributed to a new understanding of racial progress by the 1970s.

  • Civil Rights in the Cold War
  • McCarthyism and the Northern Civil Rights Movement
  • The Black Revolution on Campus
  • The Civil Rights Canon and the Politics of Respectability
  • The Early Black Studies Movement
  • Toward a Black University: Radical Upheaval at Historically Black Colleges
  • Women and the Long Civil Rights Movement

Richard J. M. Blackett

Vanderbilt University

Richard Blackett holds the Andrew Jackson Chair of History at Vanderbilt University and was the visiting Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University in 2013–2014. His research focuses on the place of African Americans in the Atlantic world, particularly their efforts to end slavery and racial discrimination. He is the author, most recently, of Making Freedom: The Underground Railroad and the Politics of Slavery (2013).

  • African Americans and the Anglo-American Abolitionist Movement
  • African Americans, the British Working Class, and the Struggle for Freedom in the United States
  • British Popular Reaction to the American Civil War
  • Community Resistance to the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law

Karen J. Blair

Central Washington University

Karen J. Blair is a professor of history at Central Washington University. She has published on U.S. women’s history, addressing women’s clubs in particular in The Clubwoman as Feminist: True Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914 (1980), The Torchbearers: The History of Women’s Amateur Arts Associations in America, 1890-1930 (1994), and a reference work, The History of American Women’s Voluntary Organizations, 1810-1960: A Guide to Sources (1989). Since residing in the Pacific Northwest, she has compiled two editions of Women in Pacific Northwest History: Essays (1988 and 2001) and a bibliography, Northwest Women: An Annotated Bibliography of Sources on the History of Oregon and Washington Women, 1787-1970 (1997). Her current research interests include the history of the lives of normal school students who trained to become public school teachers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

  • The Evolution of Women's Club Histories
  • Training for Spinsterhood: Lessons in Normal Schools for Classroom Teachers
  • Women and Politics before Suffrage: Activism and Women's Clubs

William A. Blair

Penn State University

William Blair is a Liberal Arts Research Professor of U.S. history at Penn State University, where he is also the director of the Richards Civil War Era Center and the editor of The Journal of the Civil War Era. He specializes in the social history of the Civil War, with emphases on the home front and the politics of remembering the conflict. He is the author of Virginia's Private War: Feeding Body and Soul in the Confederacy, 1861–1865 (1998) and Cities of the Dead: Contesting the Memory of the Civil War in the South, 1865–1914 (2004). His most recent book, With Malice Toward Some: Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era (2014), explores the uses of treason during and after the Civil War.

  • A Civil War Detective Hunt: The Deserter Roster and White Suffrage
  • Emancipation in African American Memory
  • Lincoln and Military Interference in Union Elections
  • The Paroles that Weren't: The Limits of Appomattox for Confederate Veterans
  • The Politics of Memorial Days in the South

David W. Blight

Yale University

David Blight is a leading expert on the life and writings of Frederick Douglass and on the Civil War in historical memory. His book Frederick Douglass’s Civil War (1989), and his editions of Douglass’s Narrative and W.E.B. Du Bois’ Souls of Black Folk are widely taught in college courses. Blight has appeared in several pbs films about African American history and works extensively with museums and other public history projects. His Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, 1863-1915 (2001), won a half-dozen prizes, including four from the OAH. He is most recently the author of American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era (2011).

  • Blue, Gray and Black: The Origins of Memorial Day, 1865-1885
  • Frederick Douglass and the Meaning of the Civil War
  • Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory
  • The Study of Historical Memory: Why, and Why Now?

John E. Bodnar

Indiana University

John E. Bodnar is a Distinguished Professor of History at Indiana University. His scholarly and teaching interests focus on modern U.S. history with a special interest in the relationship between politics and culture. His publications include The Transplanted: A History of Immigrants in Urban America (1985); Remaking America: Public Memory, Commemoration, and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century(1992); Blue-Collar Hollywood: Liberalism, Democracy, and Working People in American Film (2003); and The "Good War" in American Memory (2010).

  • The American Remembrance of World War II
  • Unruly Adults and Dissent in the 1950s
  • Witnessing the War on Terror in American Culture

Eileen Boris

University of California, Santa Barbara

Eileen Boris is the Hull Professor in the department of feminist studies and an affiliate professor of history, black studies, and global studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Art and Labor: Ruskin, Morris, and the Craftsman Ideal in America (1986) and Home to Work: Motherhood and the Politics of Industrial Homework in the United States (1994), winner of the Philip Taft Prize in Labor History, and a coauthor, with Jennifer Klein, of Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (2012), winner of the Sara A. Whaley Prize from the National Women's Studies Association. She is also a coeditor of Major Problems in the History of American Workers (2002), The Practice of U.S. Women’s History: Narratives, Intersections, and Dialogues (2007), and Intimate Labors: Technologies, Cultures, and the Politics of Care (2010). Formerly a copresident of the Coordinating Council for Women in History, president of the board of trustees of The Journal of Women’s History, and cochair of the program committee for the 2005 Thirteenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, she currently serves on the executive committee of Labor and Working Class History Association.

  • Citizens on the Job: Gender, Race, and Rights in Modern America
  • Domestic Workers Organize, Past and Present
  • More Than a Labor of Love: The Work of Care
  • The Body as a Category for Historical Analysis
  • What is Work? Who is a Worker? Homeworkers, Household Workers, and Poor Single Mothers
  • Women's Labors as the World's Work: The Transnational Reach of U.S. Labor Feminism
  • You Are What You Shop: Women Against the Sweatshop, Past and Present

Terry Bouton

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Terry Bouton is associate professor of history at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His work looks at the connections between economics and politics in the American Revolution. His book, Taming Democracy: “The People,” The Founders, and the Troubled Ending of the American Revolution (2007), uncovered the aspirations of small farmers and tried to understand why so many of them were disappointed with how the Revolution ended. Currently, he is working on a book that shows how European creditors demanded and got many key provisions in the U.S. Constitution.

  • Foreign Founders: How European Financiers Helped Write the Constitution
  • History Written by the Losers: How We Ended Up With a "Whiskey Rebellion"
  • Small Farmers and the American Revolution
  • Tar and Feathers, Hillsborough Paint, and a Road Full of Manure: The Politics of Ordinary People in Revolutionary America

New in 2013 2014Charlene M. Boyer Lewis *

Kalamazoo College

Charlene M. Boyer Lewis is a professor of history and director of the American studies program at Kalamazoo College. She specializes in women's history, southern history, and American cultural and social history in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is the author of Ladies and Gentlemen on Display: Planter Society at the Virginia Springs, 1790–1860 (2001), which focuses on the creation of southern planter identity at Virginia mountain resorts, and Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte: An American Aristocrat in the Early Republic (2012), which examines one woman's active role in the debates over society and culture in the early republic. Her next project is a study of changing expectations for love and marriage after the American Revolution.

  • Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte: Celebrity and Aristocracy in the Early American Republic
  • Ladies and Gentlemen on Display: Creating Plantation Society at the Virginia Springs, 1790–1860
  • The Architecture and Landscape of Antebellum Southern Identity: A View from the Virginia Springs
  • Love, Marriage, and Disappointment after the Revolution

Anne M. Boylan

University of Delaware

Anne M. Boylan is a professor of history and women and gender studies at the University of Delaware, where she teaches and researches women's history, social history, and historical memory. The author of Women's Rights in the United States: A History in Documents (2014); The Origins of Women's Activism: New York and Boston, 1797-1840 (2002), and Sunday School: The Formation of an American Institution (1988), she is currently working on a book about women in American historical memory. She has worked extensively with teachers of grades 3-12 through Teaching American History grants.

  • A New History of Women's Rights in the United States
  • Now Appearing at Your Local Multiplex: History!
  • Visible Women: Women in Public in the United States, 1865-1910
  • Women's History on the Radio, 1935-1953

Kevin Boyle

Northwestern University

Kevin Boyle teaches history at Northwestern University. His work focuses on race, class, and politics in the twentieth-century United States. His most recent book, Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age (2004), received the National Book Award for nonfiction. He is also the author of The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, 1945-1968 (1995) and a coauthor of Muddy Boots and Ragged Aprons: Images of Working-Class Detroit, 1900-1930 (1997).

  • Arc of Justice: The Sweet Case and the Course of Civil Rights
  • On Eddy Street: Rethinking the '60s
  • The Splendid Dead: Bartolomeo Vanzetti and the Sinews of Terror

John H. Bracey Jr.

University of Massachusetts Amherst

John H. Bracey Jr. has taught in the W. E. B. Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department of the University of Massachusetts Amherst since 1972. He is coeditor of Afro-American Women and the Vote 1837-1965 (1997); Strangers and Neighbors: Relations Between Blacks and Jews in the United States (1999); and African American Mosaic (2004). He also was coeditor of the microfilm edition of the Papers of the NAACP. His current research projects include the NAACP and organized labor, and the politics of the Black Arts Movement. His current teaching efforts consider the intersections and interactions between (traditionally defined) Native Americans and African Americans as well as between Afro-Latinos and African Americans.

  • Black-Jewish Cooperation during the Civil Rights Era: Challenges to Minority Group Leadership
  • Blacks and Jews in U.S. History: Strangers and Neighbors
  • My Encounters with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.: An Historian's Perspective
  • Teaching the Intersections: African Americans, Afro-Latinos, and Native Americans
  • The Contrasting Leadership Styles of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.
  • The NAACP and Organized Labor, 1909-1965: Conflicts and Convergences
  • The NAACP in African American History: Myths and Realities

Barry Bradford

Independent historian

A dynamic speaker and internationally respected activist, Barry Bradford has been widely recognized for his work to reopen two of the most notorious “cold cases” of the civil rights era: the Mississippi Burning case and the Clyde Kennard case. A recipient of Presidential and Congressional awards, he is also a former Illinois State Teacher of the Year as well as a winner of OAH Tachau Teacher of the Year award and the Golden Apple Award For Excellence in Teaching. He is the author of a bestselling textbook and the forthcoming “The Warrior Princesses vs. the Ku Klux Klan.” He lives in the Chicago suburbs, where he taught for more than twenty years.

  • Did the Warren Commission Get It Right? What we know today about the Kennedy assassination
  • I Love PBJ: Motivate your students to work together to create a better world
  • Murrow vs. McCarthy: The night television grew up
  • Rewriting History: How one teacher, three high school students, and a newspaperman brought justice in the Mississippi Burning case, 41 years after the crime
  • The Murder of Medgar Evers: Is it ever too late to do the right thing?

Mark Philip Bradley

University of Chicago

Mark Philip Bradley is a professor of history at the University of Chicago where his research and teaching focuses on U.S. foreign relations, the Vietnam wars, and human rights. He is the author of numerous articles and several books including the prizewinning Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919–1950 (2000) and Vietnam at War (2009). A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities, he is completing a book that explores the place of the United States in the twentieth-century global human rights imagination.

  • Making Sense of the Vietnam Wars
  • The United States and the Global Human Rights Imagination

Catherine A. Brekus

Harvard University

Catherine A. Brekus is the Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America at the Harvard Divinity School. She is the author of Strangers and Pilgrims: Female Preaching in America, 1740–1845 (1998) which explores the rise of Protestant female preaching during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and Sarah Osborn's World: The Rise of Evangelical Christianity in Early America (2013), which is based on an eighteenth-century woman's diaries. She is also the editor of The Religious History of American Women: Reimagining the Past (2007), a collection of essays that asks how women's history changes our understanding of American religion, and a coeditor, with W. Clark Gilpin, of American Christianities (2011), an introduction to the multiple forms of Christian expression in the United States.

  • The Perils of Prosperity: Christianity, Capitalism, and Consumerism in the United States
  • The Rise of Evangelicalism in Early America
  • Women, Religion, and Agency: Some Reflections on Writing American Women's Religious History

Ron Briley

Sandia Preparatory School

Ron Briley teaches history at Sandia Preparatory School in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he has taught for thirty-five years. He is the author of Class at Bat, Gender on Deck, and Race in the Hole (2003) and The Baseball Film in Postwar America: A Critical Study, 1948-1962 (2011); the editor of The Politics of Baseball: Essays on the Pastime and Power at Home and Abroad (2010); and the coeditor of James T. Farrell’s Dreaming Baseball (2007) and All Stars and Movie Stars (2008). In 2007, he was awarded a fellowship by the Woody Guthrie Foundation and is currently working on a book dealing with the folksinger’s politics. His teaching has earned recognition from the Organization of American Historians, the Society for History Education, the American Historical Association, and the National Council for History Education.

  • American History as Viewed Through the Lens of Hollywood
  • Amity Is the Key to Success: Baseball and the Cold War
  • Film and History: Incorporating Film into the History Classroom
  • The Limits of Dissent: Baseball and the Vietnam Experience
  • Woodrow Wilson Guthrie and Indigeneous Radicalism

Mark Brilliant

University of California, Berkeley

An associate professor of history and American studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and a former high school teacher, Mark Brilliant is the author of The Color of America Has Changed: How Racial Diversity Shaped Civil Rights Reform in California, 1941–1978 (2010), which won the American Society for Legal History’s Cromwell Book Prize and received an honorable mention in the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award competition. He is currently researching two new books, the first on public school financing inequality and the political and legal challenges to it from the creation of common schools through the Tax Revolt and the second on California’s Proposition 13.

  • "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner": Perez, Loving, and the Legal Fight against "Antimiscegenation"
  • "What Is Good for One Racial Classification Is Not Necessarily Good for Another": The Tension between Desegregation and Bilingual Education as Avenues of Educational Civil Rights Redress
  • How California's Civil Rights History Compels a Rethinking of America's Civil Rights History, from World War II to Bakke

New in 2013 2014Douglas Brinkley *

Rice University

Douglas Brinkley is a professor of history and a fellow at the James Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. Historian for CBS News and a contributing editor of Vanity Fair, he specializes in twentieth-century American history with an emphasis on presidents, international relations, and the environment. His most recent books include The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast (2006); The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America (2009); and Cronkite (2012). Seven of his books have been named as notable books of the year by the New York Times.

  • Topics vary

Janet Farrell Brodie

Claremont Graduate University

Janet Farrell Brodie is a professor of history at Claremont Graduate University. Her recent work examines institutional and individual engagements with the radiation from atomic weapons. Through her teaching, research, and writing, she focuses on the first decade after World War II when civilians in wide-ranging fields and institutions across America grappled with the mysteries of nuclear radiation and with the new imperatives of national security secrecy surrounding anything to do with nuclear energy.

  • Secrecy and the rand Corporation in Early Cold-War America
  • The Complicated History of Radiation Knowledge from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Atomic Bombs

New in 2013 2014Alfred L. Brophy *

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Al Brophy is the Judge John J. Parker Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He writes about law during the eras of slavery and Jim Crow as well as about the contemporary movement to address these past injustices. His books include Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 (2002) and Reparations Pro and Con (2006); the coauthored Integrating Spaces: Property Law and Race (2010); and the coedited A Companion to American Legal History (2013). His expansive study of proslavery thought in the southern academy and judiciary from Nat Turner's rebellion to the Civil War is forthcoming.

  • The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921: Race and Reparations
  • Slavery and the University in the Pre–Civil War South
  • The Nat Turner Trials
  • The Law and Future of Reparations
  • Cemeteries and Constitutional Culture before the Civil War

Leslie Brown

Williams College

An assistant professor of history at Williams College, Leslie Brown has served as a college administrator at Skidmore College and as co-coordinator of Behind the Veil: Documenting African American Life in the Jim Crow South, a collaborative research and curriculum project of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. She is author of Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class, and Black Community Development in the Urban South (2008), winner of the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award. She currently is working on a collaborative writing project about the black life in the segregated south, a monograph on African American women and migration, a coedited collection of interviews from the Behind the Veil project, and a compilation of writing and speeches by Shirley Chisholm.

  • "The Sisters and Mothers are Called to the City": African American Women and an Even Greater Migration
  • African American Life in the Jim Crow South
  • Comparing the First and Second Reconstructions
  • Emancipation and the Meaning of Freedom
  • Jim Crow and Civil Rights: Looking at the 1950s
  • Making the Capital of the Black Middle Class
  • Plenty of Opposition Which is Growing Daily: Beginning the Long Civil Rights Movement

Victoria Bissell Brown

Grinnell College

Victoria Bissell Brown is a professor emerita of history at Grinnell College where she taught for twenty-five years. Her scholarship has focused on the Progressive era in general, and on Jane Addams and Woodrow Wilson in particular. She has published an edition of Jane Addams's autobiography, Twenty Years at Hull-House (1999), and a biographical study of Addams, The Education of Jane Addams (2004). She has also published articles on Woodrow Wilson's gender politics and appeared in the pbs "American Experience" documentary on Wilson. Her current research is on the history of the American grandmother in the twentieth century.

  • Conservative among Progressives: Woodrow Wilson in the Golden Age of American Women's Higher Education
  • Did Woodrow Wilson's Gender Politics Matter? The President and the Suffrage Victory
  • Jane Addams: Queer or Gay?
  • Not Your Grandmother's Grandmother: Changes in Popular Culture Images of the American Grandmother in the Twentieth Century
  • Sex and the City: Jane Addams Confronts Prostitution

W. Fitzhugh Brundage

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

After studying lynching and racial violence in the South, W. Fitzhugh Brundage's interests shifted to the study of historical memory and American mass culture. In The Southern Past (2005), he traces the contests over memory that divided southerners, both white and black, during the past century and a half. His particular concern is the role of contests over the past as an obstacle to the emergence and recognition of pluralism in the modern South. In Beyond Blackface (2011) he brought together musicologists, cultural historians, literary scholars, and drama historians to trace the role of African Americans as creators and consumers of popular culture from 1890 to 1930. At present, he is working on a history of torture in the United States from 1500 to 2010.

  • African American Artists Interpret the Civil War in a Post-Soul Age
  • African Americans and American Popular Culture, 1890–1930
  • From Grits to the Allman Brothers: Why American Looks to the South for Authentic Culture
  • The American Tradition of Torture
  • The Civil War as a Good War
  • Whose Past? Whose Memory? Contests Over the South's History
  • “Barbarous and Fiendish Atrocities”: Debating Slave Torture in Nineteenth-Century America

Charles F. Bryan Jr.

Virginia Historical Society

Charles Bryan is president emeritus of the Virginia Historical Society. With Nelson Lankford, he coedited Eye of the Storm, A Civil War Odyssey (2000) and a follow-up volume, Images from the Storm (2001), based on the diary of Union soldier Robert K. Sneden. He is past president of the American Association for State and Local History and serves on the board of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. He is a frequent consultant and speaker at museums and historical societies throughout the United States.

  • Books That Changed the Course of American History
  • George Washington, the Model Citizen Soldier
  • Has America Lost Its National Memory?
  • How A Community Lost Its Historic Soul: A Personal Experience
  • Lee and Grant
  • Separation and Divorce: The Case of West Virginia vs. Virginia

Paul M. Buhle

Brown University

Retired as a lecturer in history and American civilization at Brown University, Paul Buhle is an honorary scholar of the Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author, editor, or coeditor of more than forty books on popular culture, comic art, film, labor, and radical history, including The Art of Harvey Kurtzman (2009) which won a Harvey Award and an Eisner Award for comic art, and It Started in Wisconsin: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Labor Protest (2012). A frequent collaborator with Harvey Pekar, he has written or edited nearly a dozen volumes of nonfiction comics, including the forthcoming “Radical Jesus”; Yiddishkeit, Jewish Vernacular, and the New Land (2011); histories of the Beat Generation, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Industrial Workers of the World; and Studs Terkel’s Working: A Graphic Adaptation (2009). He edited the three-volume set, Jews and American Popular Culture (2006). He also founded and directed the New Left journal, Radical America, and the Oral History of the American Left project at New York University.

  • American Labor's Rise, Fall, and Troubled Present
  • Comic Art Comes of Age in the Twenty-First Century
  • Legacies and Reinterpretations of the 1960s' Social Movements
  • The Hollywood Blacklist and the Films and Television Work of the Hollywood Left, 1930-1980
  • The Most Influential Satire in History: Harvey Kurtzman and MAD Magazine
  • Yiddish Heritage and the Jewish Role in American Popular Culture

Lonnie G. Bunch III

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Lonnie Bunch is the founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. Previously he served as the president of the Chicago Historical Society, the associate director for curatorial affairs at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, an education specialist with the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, and a curator of history for the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. He has written several books, including Black Angelenos: The African American in Los Angeles, 1850-1950 and the exhibition catalog, The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden (2000).

  • Black America and the California Dream
  • Interpreting African American History in American Museums
  • Race, Aviation, and Social Change: The African American in Early Aviation

New in 2013 2014Susan Burch *

Middlebury College

Susan Burch is an associate professor of American studies and a former director of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Middlebury College. Her research and teaching interests focus on deafness, disability, race, and gender and sexuality in late nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. history. She is the author of Signs of Resistance: American Deaf Cultural History, 1900 to 1942 (2002) and a coauthor, with Hannah Joyner, of Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson (2007). She has coedited anthologies including Women and Deafness: Double Visions (2006), Deaf and Disability Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2010), and the forthcoming "Disability Histories." She also served as editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of American Disability History (2009). She has received a National Archives regional residency fellowship, National Endowment for the Humanities and Mellon Foundation grants, and a Fulbright Scholars award. Her current work, tentatively entitled "Dislocated: Removals, Institutions, and Community Lives in American History," centers on the Canton Asylum, the only federal psychiatric institution for Native Americans.

  • "The Fairest of Them All": Studies in Race, Class, Gender, and Culture through Beauty Pageants
  • Every Body: A History of Disability in the United States
  • Nothing about Us without Us: Disability and Social Justice in U.S. History
  • Remembered: Race, Disability, and Gender in U.S. History

Jennifer Burns

Stanford University

Jennifer Burns is an assistant professor of history at Stanford University where she teaches courses on American political, cultural, and intellectual history. She is the author of Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right (2009), an intellectual biography of the controversial novelist and philosopher based on exclusive access to Rand’s personal papers. A popular guest on radio and television programs, Burns has been interviewed on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” C-SPAN’s Book TV, NPR’s “Weekend America,” and “Here & Now.” Podcast lectures of her introductory U.S. history course are available on iTunes and have attracted an appreciative worldwide audience.

  • Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right
  • Godless Capitalism: Ayn Rand, Faith, and Politics
  • Hippies of the Right: Ayn Rand and the Libertarian Movement
  • In Defense of Capitalism: The Ideas of Ayn Rand

Orville Vernon Burton

Clemson University

Orville Vernon Burton is Creativity Professor of Humanities and a professor of history, sociology, and computer science at Clemson University, where he directs the Clemson CyberInstitute. He is also is emeritus University Distinguished Teacher/Scholar, University Scholar, a professor of history, African American studies, and sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he is also a senior research scientist and emeritus associate director of humanities and social sciences at the National Center for Supercomputing Application, and where he was founding director of the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science. His research and teaching interests include the American South, especially race relations and community; the Civil War and the civil rights movement; and the intersection of humanities, social sciences, and technology. He has written or edited numerous books including The Age of Lincoln (2007), In My Father's House Are Many Mansions: Family and Community in Edgefield, South Carolina (1985), and Penn Center: A History Preserved (2014). A past president of the Southern Historical Association and the Agricultural History Society, he is currently vice chair of the board of directors of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation. Recognized for his outstanding teaching, Burton has been named U.S. Research and Doctoral University Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and has also won the American Historical Association's Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Prize.

  • Lincoln (multiple talks available, including The Age of Lincoln, Lincoln and the Constitution)
  • Remembering the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1965
  • Penn Center and the Civil Rights Movement
  • Penn Center: The Abolitionist Legacy from the Civil War to the Present
  • Civil Rights Movement (multiple talks available)
  • Civil War and Reconstruction (multiple talks available)
  • Cyberinfrastructure for the Humanities: Recent Advances in Digital History

Jon Butler

Yale University

Jon Butler is the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of American Studies, History, and Religious Studies at Yale University, an adjunct research professor of history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and the president-elect of the OAH. His award-winning books include The Huguenots in America: A Refugee People in New World Society (1983); Awash in A Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People (1990); and Becoming America: The Revolution Before 1776 (2000). His newest project is a history of religion in Manhattan between the Gilded Age and the 1960 Kennedy election, entitled "God in Gotham."

  • God in Gotham: Modern Manhattan as a Sacred City
  • Overestimating the Puritans: Understanding America's Religious Origins
  • The Rise of Religion in Modern America

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Lendol Calder

Augustana College

Lendol Calder is a professor of history at Augustana College. The author of Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Consumer Credit (1999), his overview of the historiography of money management appears in the Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption (2012). Since being named a Carnegie Scholar in 1999, Calder has also worked to advance the field of history teaching and learning. His landmark 2006 essay, “Uncoverage: Toward a Signature Pedagogy for the History Survey,” calls on teachers to demystify historical mindedness by uncovering historians’ basic modes of thought and providing students the practice they need to internalize historical thinking as habits of their own.

  • "The Usurer's Grip": What a Lost Silent Film Reveals about the Origins of the American Debt Wish
  • The Problem with Coverage: Why History Teachers Need a Signature Pedagogy
  • The Stories They Tell: Why High School Graduates Don't Value History and What We Can Do about It
  • The Way to Wealth: How Americans Have Managed Money from Colonial Times to the Present

Albert Camarillo

Stanford University

A past president of the OAH, Albert Camarillo is the Leon Sloss Jr. Memorial Professor at Stanford University. He is the author of several books, including Chicanos in California: A History of Mexican Americans (1984), Chicanos in a Changing Society (1996), and the forthcoming "The Racial Borderhoods of America: Mexican Americans and the Changing Ethnic/Racial Landscapes of Cities, 1850-2000."

  • Comparative Urban Histories of European Immigrants, Mexican Americans, and African Americans, 1900-1980
  • Mexican Immigration, Past and Present
  • Race and Ethnicity in Modern America
  • The New Racial Frontier: Minority-Majority Cities in Contemporary America

Ballard C. Campbell

Northeastern University

Ballard Campbell is an emeritus professor of history and public policy at Northeastern University. He is a past president of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, and the New England Historical Association. A historical political economist, he is the author of Representative Democracy (1980), The Growth of American Government (1995, updated edition 2014), American Disasters (2008), and American Wars (2012), and a coeditor of American Presidential Campaigns and Elections (2003). He is working on a book about building the American state in the long nineteenth century.

  • Economic Causes of Progressivism
  • Federalism and American History
  • War, Depression, and State-building in the Long Nineteenth Century

James T. Campbell

Stanford University

James T. Campbell is the Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States History at Stanford University. His research focuses on American and African American history, as well as the broader history of the black Atlantic. He is also interested in problems of historical memory or the ways that societies tell stories about their past, not only in textbooks and scholarly monographs but also in historic sites, museums, memorials, movies, and political movements. His publications include Songs of Zion: The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa (1995); Race, Nation, and Empire in American History (2007); and Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 (2006). He is currently completing a book on the history and memory of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project.

  • Building Community-Based Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Freedom Summer: The History and Legacy of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project
  • History and Memory of the Civil Rights Movement
  • Retrospective Justice (truth commissions, reparations, national apologies, etc.)
  • Slavery in American History and Memory
  • The Transatlantic Slave Trade

Margot Canaday

Princeton University

Margot Canaday is a legal and political historian who studies gender and sexuality in modern America. Her first book, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America (2009), examines government regulation of homosexuality during the twentieth century. In her current project, a queer history of the modern American workplace, she shifts her focus from the state to the economy and takes on the idea that twentieth-century workplaces were part of the “straight world”—zones in which lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people historically disappeared. Canaday has taught at Princeton University since 2005.

  • Finding the Lesbian in the State
  • Toward a Queer History of the Workplace

Christopher Capozzola

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Christopher Capozzola is an associate professor of history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he teaches classes on political and legal history, war and the military, and the history of immigration. He is the author of Uncle Sam Wants You: World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen (2008) and is currently completing a history of Filipino soldiers in the armed forces of the United States and the Philippines from the 1890s to the present. He is also a cocurator of "The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I," a historical exhibition commemorating the centennial of the First World War.

  • Immigrants and the U.S. Armed Forces: Becoming Americans?
  • The Constitution and the First World War: A Forgotten History?
  • Uncle Sam, Rosie the Riveter, and G.I. Joe: American Icons at War
  • World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen

New in 2013 2014William D. Carrigan *

Rowan University

William D. Carrigan is a professor of history and the chair of the history department at Rowan University where, since 1999, he has taught over one hundred courses and thousands of students on such topics as the Civil War and Reconstruction, the American West, and the history of New Jersey. A native Texan, he is the author or editor of four books, including The Making of a Lynching Culture: Violence and Vigilantism in Central Texas, 1836–1916 (2004). In collaboration with Clive Webb over the past decade, he has been studying the lynching of Mexicans in the United States. With the support of grants and fellowships from numerous institutions, including the Huntington Library, the National Science Foundation, and the Clements Center, they have published four essays on the subject as well as Forgotten Dead: Mob Violence against Mexicans in the United States, 1848-1928 (2013). Carrigan's research has been cited widely in the news media, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Nation, and the Houston Chronicle.

  • Why Ordinary People Lynched
  • Forgotten Dead: Mob Violence against Mexicans in the United States
  • The Myths of Reconstruction
  • Accidents of History: Contingency, Chance, and the Role of Individuals in the Past
  • Traitor State or Jersey Blue? New Jersey and the American Civil War

Clayborne Carson

Stanford University

In 1985, Clayborne Carson accepted the invitation of Coretta Scott King to direct a long-term project to edit and publish the papers of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The founding director of Stanford’s King Research and Education Institute, he is the author of Martin’s Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. (2013), a coauthor of The Struggle for Freedom: A History of African Americans (2007), and has written or edited numerous works based on the papers, including The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. (1998) and the docudrama “Passages of Martin Luther King.” He was also a senior adviser for the award-winning public television series, “Eyes on the Prize.”

  • King and Gandhi
  • King and Malcolm X
  • Martin Luther King Jr. and Global Liberation
  • Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Richard Carwardine

Corpus Christi College, Oxford University

Richard Carwardine is the president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford University. Elected a fellow of the British Academy in 2006, he is the author of Transatlantic Revivalism: Popular Evangelicalism in Britain and America 1790-1865 (1978) and Evangelicals and Politics in Antebellum America (1993). His analytical political biography of Abraham Lincoln won the Lincoln Prize in 2004; the American edition was subsequently published as Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power (2006). He is currently working on a study of religion in American national construction between the Revolution and the Civil War.

  • "Wonderful Self-Reliance": Abraham Lincoln's Leadership
  • Abraham Lincoln and the Fourth Estate: The White House and the Press during the American Civil War
  • Abraham Lincoln's Sense of Humor
  • Abraham Lincoln, Citizen of the World
  • Abraham Lincoln, God, and the American Civil War
  • Battling for Souls: Interdenominational Warfare in the Early American Republic

Andrew Cayton

Miami University

Andrew Cayton, Distinguished Professor of History at Miami University, teaches courses in the history of North America in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He has written extensively about the struggle for control of the region west of the Appalachian Mountains and the emergence of political and cultural borders within the United States. His interest in empires and borderlands as well as questions of power and consent led to his collaboration with Fred Anderson in The Dominion of War: Empire and Liberty in North America, 1500–2000 (2005) and to his current work, also with Fred Anderson, “Imperial America, 1672–1764.” He is also the author of Love in the Time of Revolution: Transatlantic Literary Radicalism and Historical Change, 1793–1818 (2013) and has served as president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.

  • Acts of Imagination: Literature and Revolution in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World
  • Local History as World History: The Origins of the American Midwest
  • The Significance of the War of 1812 in North American History
  • War and Empire in Trans-Appalachian North America, 1754-1815

Bruce Chadwick

New Jersey City University

Few lecturers have as varied a background as historian Bruce Chadwick. After a long and distinguished career as a newspaper reporter, he is a professor of journalism and history at New Jersey City University, an American studies teacher at Rutgers University, and the author of twenty-nine books, most recently focusing on Revolutionary War and Civil War history as well as on forensics. Currently the entertainment critic for the History News Network, he has appeared often on the History Channel and has lectured extensively across the United States and abroad.

  • America's First Ladies: The Powers behind the Scenes
  • Forensics for Everyone: A Colorful Look at the History of Forensics
  • Fuhgeddaboutit: Organized Crime in American Culture
  • George and Martha: America's First First Couple and How They Made America
  • James and Dolley Madison: America's First Power Couple
  • Let George Do It: George Washington as Leader of the Continental Army and the First President
  • The First American Army: The Story Behind the Men Who Fought the American Revolution
  • The Rise of Abraham Lincoln: The Growth of a Politician from 1832 to 1860

William H. Chafe

Duke University

Much of Bill Chafe’s professional scholarship reflects his long-term interest in issues of race and gender equality. Former dean of the faculty of arts and sciences at Duke University, he is the Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of History and a cofounder of the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women, the Duke Center for the Study of Civil Rights and Race Relations, and the Duke Center for Documentary Studies. A past president of the OAH and a recipient of the OAH Roy Rosenzweig Distinguished Service Award, he is the author of several books, including Bill and Hillary: The Politics of the Personal (2012); Civilities and Civil Rights (1979), which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award; and Never Stop Running: Allard Lowenstein and the Struggle to Save American Liberalism (1993), which won the Sidney Hillman Book Award. He is also a coeditor of Remembering Jim Crow (2001) which won the Lillian Smith Book Award.

  • American Politics from Roosevelt to Obama
  • Bill and Hillary: The Politics of the Personal
  • Changing Gender Roles from 1920 to the Present
  • Contemporary Feminism and Civil Rights
  • From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: Laying a Foundation for Change
  • Private Lives, Public Consequences: Personality and Politics in the Modern Presidency
  • The 1950s: Perhaps the Most Important Decade of Postwar America
  • The Challenges Facing Barack Obama: An Historical Perspective

Robert W. Cherny

San Francisco State University

Robert W. Cherny is a professor emeritus of history at San Francisco State University. His research and teaching interests are in U.S. history 1865–1940, politics, labor, and the West, especially California and San Francisco. His published work includes American Politics in the Gilded Age, 1868–1900 (1997); San Francisco, 1865–1932 (1981), with William Issel; A Righteous Cause: The Life of William Jennings Bryan (1985); coedited anthologies on California women and politics (2011) and labor and the Cold War (2004); coauthored textbooks on U.S. and California history; and numerous journal articles, the most recent of which deal with communism and anticommunism on the West Coast. He has been a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer at Moscow State University, and Senior Fulbright Lecturer at Heidelberg University, and he has spoken to Teaching American History programs around the country. He is currently finishing a biography of Victor Arnautoff, a leading muralist in San Francisco and an officer in the White Siberian Army during the Russian Civil War who became a member of the Communist Party in the late 1930s and emigrated to the Soviet Union at the end of his life.

  • Communism and Anticommunism in California in the 1930s
  • Is California Government Inevitably Dysfunctional?
  • Pacific Coast Longshore and Maritime Labor, from the Gold Rush to Containerization
  • Seattle/Seiatel': An American Agricultural Commune in the Soviet Union, 1922–1939
  • The Great San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906
  • The Odyssey of Victor Arnautoff, 1896–1979: Art and Politics on Three Continents
  • The Transformation of American Politics, 1890–1917

Howard P. Chudacoff

Brown University

Howard P. Chudacoff has been teaching and writing about American social and urban history for over four decades, almost all of which have been spent at Brown University where he is currently the George L. Littlefield Professor of American History and a professor of urban studies. Early in his career, he became interested in various aspects of family and individual life cycles, and he wrote about changes in components and stages of the family, such as newlyweds and old age. Then his research shifted to the nexus between culture and society, and he wrote How Old Are You? Age Consciousness in American Culture (1989), which explores how notions of age and age grading in American society evolved and became increasingly important in the culture, and The Age of the Bachelor: Creating an American Subculture (1999), which examines the ways that the subculture of unmarried men influenced the larger culture of all men as well as the rest of American society. He is also the author of Children At Play: An American History (2007), which examines children’s culture through the tensions that developed between how children actually played and how adults believed and wanted them to play. Currently, he is writing a book on major turning points in the history of intercollegiate athletics in America.

  • Baseball, Birthdays, and the Transformation of Everyday Life in America
  • Invention of the "Student-Athlete" and the Creation of Modern College Sports
  • The History of Children's Play in the United States: Change and Continuity
  • Title IX and the Rise of Women's Intercollegiate Athletics: Victory and Defeat

Mary Marshall Clark

Columbia University

Mary Marshall Clark directs the Columbia University Oral History Research Office, the first university-based oral history program and archive in the world, founded in 1948. She is a past president of the United States Oral History Association and has served on the executive council of the International Oral History Association. Currently, she directs one of the largest oral history projects documenting the events and aftermath of September 11, 2001. She has also conducted a wide range of biographical interviews for Columbia University on a wide variety of subjects—including women’s history, media and journalism history, political history, philanthropy, and the history of psychoanalysis—speaking with U.S. congresswoman Bella Abzug and Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, among others.

  • Creating Community Oral History Projects in Communities and Across Cultures
  • Documenting Catastrophe through Oral History: Preserving Histories of Trauma
  • September 11, 2001 in Time, History, and the Imagination: An Oral History
  • The Art and Praxis of Oral History: A Method and a Discipline
  • Twice Betrayed: The Aftermath of September 11 in Immigrant and Refugee Communities

Dorothy Sue Cobble

Rutgers University

A distinguished professor of history and labor studies at Rutgers University, Dorothy Sue Cobble specializes in the history of U.S. politics and social movements in the twentieth century. She is a coauthor of Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women's Movements (2014) as well as the author of The Other Women’s Movement: Workplace Justice and Social Rights in Modern America (2004), winner of the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award, among other works. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Russell Sage Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. Currently she is writing on women's social justice internationalism and on U.S. worker movements for egalitarian democracy. She is also completing a biography of consumer and women's rights activist Esther Peterson.

  • Classing Gender History
  • Esther Peterson: The Mormon Radical Who Launched Women's Liberation
  • The Feminist New Deal
  • The Pregnancy Heard Round the World: International Labor Feminism in 1919
  • Upending Corporate Power: American Labor Movements and the Long New Deal
  • Women and the Civil Rights Act: A Half-Century Retrospective

Peter A. Coclanis

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Peter A. Coclanis is the Albert R. Newsome Distinguished Professor of History and the director of the Global Research Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of numerous works in U.S. and international economic history, including The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920 (1989); with David L. Carlton, The South, the Nation, and the World: Perspectives on Southern Economic Development (2003); and Time’s Arrow, Time’s Cycle: Globalization in Southeast Asia over la Longue Durée (2006).

  • Agriculture and American Economic Development
  • Capitalism and Slavery
  • Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship in American History
  • Globalization in Historical Perspective
  • How the Economies of the North and South Came to Differ
  • Labor and Capital in Nineteenth-Century America: The Standard-of-Living Controversy Revisited
  • Slavery and the Southern Economy: Myths and Realities
  • The Globalization of Agriculture: A Cautionary Note from the Rice Trade
  • The Postwar Boom in Retrospect

Charles L. Cohen

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Charles L. Cohen is the E. Gordon Fox Professor of American Institutions and the director of the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Winner of the Society of American Historians' Allan Nevins Prize as well as several distinguished teaching awards, he works on early American history, American religious history, and the braided history of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. He is a coeditor, with Paul S. Boyer, of Religion and the Culture of Print in Modern America (2008); with Leonard V. Caplan, of Theology and the Soul of the Liberal State (2010); and, with Ronald Numbers, of Gods in America: Religious Pluralism in the United States (2013).

  • A Cultural History of America's Thanksgiving
  • Jews and Muslims in Christian America
  • The Limits of Missions in the Early Modern World

Patricia Cline Cohen

University of California, Santa Barbara

Patricia Cline Cohen is a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara and teaches courses in nineteenth-century U.S. women and gender. She is the author of The Murder of Helen Jewett: The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York (1998) and a coauthor of The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (2008). She is currently working on a manuscript tentatively titled, "Married Advocates of Free Love: Mary Gove Nichols and Thomas L. Nichols and their Quest to Reform Traditional Marriage." Gove Nichols and her husband were antebellum medical practitioners and journalists who endorsed vegetarianism, hydrotherapy, and mesmerism. They wrote books on sexual physiology and on the history and anthropology of marriage. Their critique of lifelong monogamy, labeled "free love" by their opponents, defined the radical edge of the larger woman's movement of that era.

  • "Social Media" circa 1840: Satirical "Flash" Newspapers and Communities of Urban Youth
  • Finding Helen Jewett: Unearthing the Mystery of a Murdered Prostitute in 1830s New York
  • Radical Marriage Reform in the 1840s and 1850s

New in 2013 2014Jon Thomas Coleman *

University of Notre Dame

Jon Thomas Coleman is a professor of history at the University of Notre Dame. A Guggenheim fellow, he is the author of Vicious: Wolves and Men in America (2004), winner of the Western History Association's W. Turrentine Jackson Award and the American Historical Association's John H. Dunning Prize, and Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, a Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation (2012).

  • Bear Attacks! A Historical Guide
  • Slow: A Historical Preview of Going Nowhere Fast
  • The Howling Past: Wolves in American History

Bettye Collier-Thomas

Temple University

Bettye Collier-Thomas is professor of history at Temple University. She specializes in race and gender history, particularly religion, politics, and civil rights. Her publications include “Jesus, Jobs, and Justice”: African American Women and Religion (2010), Daughters of Thunder: Black Women Preachers and Their Sermons, 1850-1979 (1998), and Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement (2001). She founded and served as first executive director of the Bethune Museum and Archives National Historic Site, in Washington, D.C. In 1994 she received the Conservation Service Award from the Department of the Interior for creating the first institution in the United States that focuses solely on black women’s history. She is currently writing a history of African American women and politics.

  • "In Black and White": Race Relations in the Era of Jim Crow
  • Across the Divide: Women and the Twentieth Century Interracial Movement
  • African American Women, "Citizenship Rights," and Politics
  • God, Race, and Religion: Black Women and Africa

Steven Conn

Ohio State University

Steven Conn teaches intellectual, cultural, urban, and public history at Ohio State University. He also directs the public history initiative there and is the founding editor of its monthly online magazine, Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective. He is the author of five monographs, including Americans against the City: Anti-urbanism in the Twentieth Century (2014) and Do Museums Still Need Objects? (2010), and the editor of To Promote the General Welfare: The Case for Big Government (2012) and Building the Nation: Americans Write about Their Architecture, Their Cities, and Their Landscape (2003).

  • Cultural and Intellectual History of American Cities
  • Museums and Their Role in American Life Past, Present, Future
  • Public History and Its Roles Inside and Outside the History Profession
  • The Love-Hate Relationship That Americans Have with the State

Blanche Wiesen Cook

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York

The Distinguished Professor of History and Women’s Studies at the John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Blanche Wiesen Cook is the author of the award-winning Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume I, 1884-1933 (1992) and Volume II, The Defining Years, 1933-1938 (1999). She is now working on the third and final volume. For more than twenty years, she produced and hosted her own program for Pacifica Radio and has appeared frequently as a television news commentator. She also was a cofounding cochair of the OAH’s Committee on Research and Access to Historical Documentation and the founder and cochair of the Fund for Open Information and Accountability, Inc.

  • Eleanor Roosevelt and the Quest for Peace and Human Rights
  • Eleanor Roosevelt, Women, and Power
  • The Assault Against Freedom of Information and Access to Presidential Papers
  • The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom at 100

Stephanie Coontz

The Evergreen State College

Stephanie Coontz teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen State College and is the director of research and public education for the Council on Contemporary Families, which she chaired from 2001 to 2004. She is the author of the forthcoming “‘A Strange Stirring’: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s” and the award-winning Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage (2005), and the editor of American Families: A Multicultural Reader (2008). She is interested in the trade-offs and paradoxes of historical changes in family life, gender relations, and intimate partnerships. She has appeared on numerous television news and talk programs as well as in several prime-time television documentaries. She received the Council on Contemporary Families’ first “Visionary Leadership” Award in 2004 as well as the Dale Richmond Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  • "Mad Men," Working "Girls," and Real-Life Desperate Housewives: The Unliberated Sixties and Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique
  • For Better AND Worse: Understanding America's Changing Families
  • Media Training for Academics (a workshop)
  • The Unadulterated History of Marriage
  • The Way We Never Were: How Myths about Families of the Past Harm Families of the Present

Saul Cornell

Fordham University

Saul Cornell is the Paul and Diane Guenther Chair in American History at Fordham University. He specializes in early American history and legal/Constitutional history. He is the author of The Other Founders: Anti-Federalism and the Dissenting Tradition in America, 1788-1828 (1999) and A Well Regulated Militia: The Founding Fathers and the Origins of Gun Control in America (2006), among other works. He also has a strong interest in teaching with technology and is writing a section of a new textbook, “Visions of America: A History of the United States.”

  • After Newtown: The Future of the American Gun Debate
  • The Second Amendment Goes to Court: District of Columbia v. Heller in Historical Context
  • Visions of America: Visual Teaching Strategies for the Survey Course

Nancy F. Cott

Harvard University

Vice president of the OAH, Nancy F. Cott teaches at Harvard University, where she is the Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History. Her writings range widely over questions concerning women, gender, marriage, and sexuality from the eighteenth century to the contemporary United States. Her books include The Bonds of Womanhood: "Woman's Sphere" in New England, 1780-1835 (1977), The Grounding of Modern Feminism (1987), and Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation (2000). Since 2000, she has written amicus briefs and submitted affidavits and expert reports on the history of marriage in same-sex marriage suits in numerous states.

  • Marriage on Trial: Historians in Court
  • Revisiting the 1920s Generation
  • The American History of Marriage

Edward Countryman

Southern Methodist University

Edward Countryman won the Bancroft Prize for A People in Revolution: The American Revolution and Political Society in New York, 1760-1790 (1981). He also has written The American Revolution (1985, revised edition in progress), Americans: A Collision of Histories (1996), and, most recently, Enjoy the Same Liberty: African Americans and the Era of the American Revolution (2011). His teaching interest in film studies led to Shane (1999), with Evonne Von Heussen Countryman. He has taught in New Zealand and Britain and is now a University Distinguished Professor in the Clements Department of History at Southern Methodist University.

  • African Americans and the Age of the American Revolution
  • Getting to Know George Washington
  • John Wayne's 1940s and American History
  • Making Sense of Colonial America
  • The Contested Spaces of Colonial America
  • The Continental Turn and the Origins of the American Revolution
  • The Price of Cotton: Mississippi in 1850
  • What Did the American Revolution Change?

New in 2013 2014Jefferson Cowie *

Cornell University

Called "one of our most commanding interpreters of recent American experience" by The Nation, Jefferson Cowie holds the ILR Dean's Professor Chair at Cornell University, where he teaches social, political, labor, and working class history. He is the author of Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class (2010), winner of several "best book" awards, including the Francis Parkman Prize and the OAH Merle Curti Awards, and Capital Moves: RCA's Seventy Year Quest for Cheap Labor (2001), which won the Phillip Taft Labor History Book Award. Cowie's essays and opinion pieces have appeared in the New York Times, The American Prospect, The New Republic, Dissent, and other popular publications. He has also appeared in a variety of media outlets, including C‐SPAN's "Booknotes" and NPR’s "Weekend Edition," as well as documentaries. He is currently working on a short book on the New Deal and a long book on the global history of the wage.

  • A Nation without Class: A Social History of Inequality since the 1970s
  • Individualism and Democracy: Bridging Democratic Theory with Bruce Springsteen
  • Stayin' Alive: Class and Popular Culture in the 1970s
  • The Long Exception: Rethinking the New Deal in American History

Karen L. Cox

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Karen L. Cox is a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she teaches courses in American history with a focus on southern history and culture. She is the author of Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture (2003), which won the Southern Association for Women Historians' Julia Cherry Spruill Prize, and Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture (2011), and the editor of Destination Dixie: Tourism and Southern History (2012). She writes about representations of the region and its people in contemporary popular media in the blog Pop South: Reflections on the South in Popular Culture, and she has appeared on C-SPAN and Canadian Public Radio and has written op-eds for the New York Times.

  • Gone with the Wind in Popular Culture
  • The South in American Popular Culture
  • The South in Reality Television
  • Women and Confederate Memory

Margaret S. Creighton

Bates College

Margaret Creighton is a professor of history at Bates College. In her work on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, she has reexamined some of America’s best-known narratives and historic sites. She has revisited the story of the deepwater sailing ship, the Civil War battlefield, and, most recently, the baseball field. Her books include Rites and Passages: The Experience of American Whaling (1995) and Dogwatch and Liberty Days: Seafaring in the Nineteenth Century (1982). She is also a coeditor, with Lisa Norling, of Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Atlantic Seafaring (1996). Most recently, her Colors of Courage: Gettysburg’s Forgotten History (2005) considers the legendary battle of Gettysburg from the perspectives of white women civilians, African American civilians, and immigrant soldiers. This book was a runner-up for the Lincoln Prize and named as one of the five best books on Gettysburg by the Wall Street Journal.

  • Gettysburg's Loose Canon: The Shifting Story of the Civil War's Big Battle
  • Gettysburg's Lost Battle: African Americans and the Campaign of 1863
  • The Invisible Battle: Women at Gettysburg, 1863
  • The Red Sox and the Yankees: A Cultural History of a Rivalry

Joseph Crespino

Emory University

Joseph Crespino is an associate professor of history at Emory University. His research focuses on the political and social history of twentieth-century America, particularly southern history and the United States since 1945. He teaches courses on the South since Reconstruction, the long 1960s, politics and ideology in post–World War II America, and the southern civil rights movement. He is the author of Strom Thurmond’s America (2012) and In Search of Another Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution (2007) and is a coeditor of The Myth of Southern Exceptionalism (2010).

  • How the South Became Republican, or a History of Red-State America
  • The 1964 Civil Rights Act: Leadership and Social Movements in Civil Rights Era America
  • The Southern Civil Rights Movement in History and Memory
  • Wrestling with Strom Thurmond: Race, Region, and the Rise of the American Right

Spencer Crew

George Mason University

Spencer Crew has worked at museums as well as universities over the past twenty-five years. Currently the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of American, African American, and Public History at George Mason University, he is the former director of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and the former president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. His primary area of research interest is African American history, and he has created exhibitions and written on both the Underground Railroad and the migration of African Americans to the North during and after World War I.

  • African American Migration: The Great Migration, 1915–1940
  • John Brown and the Underground Railroad
  • Seedbed of the Modern Civil Rights Movement: A Prequel Story
  • The Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • The Real Story of the Underground Railroad
  • The Story of Slavery through the Voices of the Formerly Enslaved

Daniel Czitrom

Mount Holyoke College

Daniel Czitrom has taught American cultural and political history at Mount Holyoke College since 1981. He is a coauthor, with Bonnie Yochelson, of Rediscovering Jacob Riis: Exposure Journalism and Photography in Turn of the Century New York (2008). His Media and the American Mind: From Morse to McLuhan (1982) received the American Historical Association's First Book Award and has been translated into Chinese and Spanish. He is also a coauthor of Out of Many: A History of the American People (7th edition, 2011), which was banned from Texas high schools in 2003. His new book, "New York Exposed: How A Gilded-Age Police Scandal Shocked the Nation and Launched the Progressive Era," will be published in 2015.

  • Banned in Texas: An Historian's Adventure in the Culture Wars
  • Jacob Riis's New York
  • New York Exposed: How A Gilded Age Police Scandal Shocked the Nation and Launched the Progressive Era

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Kathleen Dalton

Phillips Academy Andover

Kathleen Dalton is the Cecil F.P. Bancroft Instructor of History at Phillips Academy Andover as well as an external fellow of Boston University’s International History Institute. The author of Theodore Roosevelt: A Strenuous Life (2002) and A Portrait of a School: Coeducation at Andover (1986), she has spoken widely about Theodore Roosevelt, including appearances on C-SPAN’s Book TV, the History Channel, the Arts and Entertainment Channel, and public television; her writing has appeared in numerous newspapers. She is currently working on her next book, “The White Lilies and the Iron Boot,” a story of four friends (including Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt) and their attempts to shape U.S. foreign relations during a dangerous time.

  • Eleanor's Other Friend: The First Lady as Seen Through the Diaries of Caroline Drayton Phillips
  • Environmental History Giants: John Muir Meets Theodore Roosevelt
  • How Radical Was He? The Contradictory Politics of Theodore Roosevelt
  • Internationalizing Progressivism
  • Life Lessons from the Great Depression: How We Held Our Heads High the Last Time the Bottom Fell Out
  • Presidential Bonds: What Franklin and Theodore Roosevelt Had in Common, Besides Loving Eleanor
  • Rooseveltian Leadership: Understanding the Problem of Leadership By Looking at the Presidencies of Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt

Pete Daniel

Independent historian

A past president of the OAH and a retired curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, Pete Daniel specializes in the history of the twentieth-century South. He has curated exhibits that deal with science, photography, and music, and he is author of Toxic Drift: Pesticides and Health in the Post-World War II South (2005); Lost Revolutions: The South in the 1950s (2000); and most recently, Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights (2013). He is also a past president of the Southern Historical Association.

  • African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights

Roger Daniels

University of Cincinnati

A past president of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era as well as the Immigration History Society, Roger Daniels is the Charles Phelps Taft Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Cincinnati. He served as a consultant to the Presidential Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians and is a planning committee member for the immigration museum on Ellis Island. His recent works include Not Like Us: Immigration and Minorities in America, 1890-1924 (1997); an expanded edition of Coming to America: A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American Life (2002); Guarding the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy and Immigrants (2004); an expanded edition of Prisoners Without Trial: Japanese Americans in World War II (2004); and The Japanese American Cases: The Rule of Law in Time of War (2013). Shortly after his retirement, Daniels moved to Bellevue, Washington, which reunited three generations of his family. He continues to research, write, consult, and lecture.

  • American Immigration
  • American Immigration Policy
  • Incarceration of the Japanese Americans, 1942 to the Present
  • The Asian American Experience

Adrienne D. Davis

Washington University in St. Louis

Adrienne Davis is vice provost and the William M. Van Cleve Professor of Law at Washington University in St. Louis, where she also is the founder and a codirector of the Law, Identity, and Culture Initiative and the director of the Black Sexual Economies Project for the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Work and Social Capital. Her scholarship emphasizes the gendered and private law dimensions of American slavery. She also does work on conceptions of justice and reparations, marriage and sexuality, and work/family conflict. She coedited Privilege Revealed: How Invisible Preference Undermines America (1996) and is a former editor of the Journal of Legal Education and Law and History Review as well as a past chair of the law and humanities section of the American Association of Law Schools.

  • African American Legal History
  • Intersections of History and Critical Theory
  • Property
  • Reparations
  • U.S. Slavery (particularly gender and slavery)
  • Women's Legal History

Cornelia H. Dayton

University of Connecticut

Cornelia H. Dayton teaches colonial North American history, gender in the early modern period, and U.S. legal history at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Women before the Bar: Gender, Law, and Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789 (1995) and a coauthor, with Sharon V. Salinger, of Warning Out: Robert Love's Search for Strangers in Pre-Revolutionary Boston (2009), a study of the Massachusetts practice of warning strangers and the lives of hundreds of ordinary people-on-the-move affected by it. Engaged for the past decade in exploring how mental and developmental disorders were understood and treated at the family and local levels prior to 1840, she is also investigating poor relief, almshouses, and the lives of African New Englanders.

  • Autism in History: A Puzzle
  • Coping with Mental Disorders and Learning Disabilities before the Rise of Specialists
  • The Braided Lives of Lucy and Scipio Pernam, African New Englanders
  • Warning Out: How and Why Colonial Boston Regulated Strangers
  • Women before the Bar: Snapshots of Early American Courtrooms

Philip J. Deloria

University of Michigan

Philip Deloria is the Carroll Smith-Rosenberg Collegiate Professor and and associate dean for undergraduate education at the University of Michigan. He is a past president of the American Studies Association; the author of Indians in Unexpected Places (2004) and Playing Indian (1998); and a coeditor, with Neal Salisbury, of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (2001). His research and teaching focus on the cultural and ideological intersections of Indian and non-Indian worlds.

  • American Indians in the American Imagination

Sarah Deutsch

Duke University

Sarah Deutsch is a professor of history at Duke University. Her research focuses on gender, racial, and spatial formations from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. She has published extensively on gender and race relations in the U.S. West, particularly the Southwest, and on the urban northeast. Her most recent book is Women and the City: Gender, Space, and Power in Boston, 1870-1940 (2000), and her most recent article is “Being American in Boley, Oklahoma,” in Beyond Black and White (2004). She is currently at work on a history of the U.S. West from 1898-1942.

  • Dreams of Inclusion: Re-narrating Race and Gender in the History of the U.S. West
  • Power, Place and Identity: Women in Public, 1890-1930
  • Shifting Paradigms and Racing Mexicans in the Age of U.S. Imperialism
  • The Speculator State: The West and Citizenship in the 1920s

William Deverell

University of Southern California

William Deverell is director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West and professor of history at the University of Southern California. He has written widely on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century history of California and the far West. His recent publications include Whitewashed Adobe: The Rise of Los Angeles and the Remaking of Its Mexican Past (2004) and the coedited volume, Land of Sunshine: An Environmental History of Metropolitan Los Angeles (2004). Deverell is the editor of the Blackwell Companion to the American West (2004) and coeditor of the forthcoming "Blackwell Companion to the History of California" and the "Blackwell Companion to the History of Los Angeles."

  • California History
  • History of Los Angeles
  • The West and the Civil War
  • Western Environmental History
  • Western History

Bruce J. Dierenfield

Canisius College

Bruce Dierenfield is a professor of American history, the director of the All-College Honors Program, and the former coordinator of the African American Experience program at Canisius College. He has been recognized as a Peter Canisius Distinguished Professor and has received the college's Kenneth L. Koessler Distinguished Faculty Award. He is the author, most recently, of the prizewinning The Battle over School Prayer: How Engel v. Vitale Changed America (2007), The Civil Rights Movement (revised edition, 2008), and A History of African-American Leadership (3rd edition, 2012).

  • The Epic School Prayer Case of Engel v. Vitale (1962)
  • "The Most Hated Woman in America": Madalyn Murray O'Hair's Atheist Crusade Against Religion
  • Heroes and Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement
  • New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement
  • Ten Myths of the Civil Rights Movement
  • An Overview of Church and State in America

Angela D. Dillard

University of Michigan

Angela D. Dillard is a professor of Afroamerican and African studies and the director of the Residential College at the University of Michigan. She writes and speaks on issues of race and politics on both the left and the right sides of the political spectrum. Her books include Faith in the City: Preaching Radical Social Change in Detroit (2007) and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner Now? Multicultural Conservatism in America (2001), a critical study of the rise of political conservatism among African Americans, Latinos, women, and homosexuals. She is currently at work on a political biography of James H. Meredith, the civil rights icon turned conservative Republican.

  • Black Power/Black Faith: Rethinking the "De-Christianization" of the Black Freedom Struggle
  • Difficult Subjects: James H. Meredith, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Problem of Monumental History
  • Faith and Leadership in the Northern Civil Rights Movement
  • Faith, Race, and American Politics
  • The Civil Rights Movement and the Rise of Modern Black Conservatism: Rethinking Alliances, Allegiances, and the Complexities of Political Culture
  • What the "New" Black Conservatives Tell Us about Race and Leadership

Hasia Diner

New York University

Hasia Diner is the Paul and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History at New York University, with joint appointment in the department of history and the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. She is also director of the Goldstein Goren Center for American Jewish History. She has built her scholarly career around the study of American Jewish history, American immigration and ethnic history, and the history of American women. She has written about the ways in which American Jews in the early twentieth century reacted to the issue of race and the suffering of African Americans, and the process by which American Jews came to invest deep meaning in New York’s Lower East Side. She is the author of We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence After the Holocaust (2009), winner of a National Jewish Book Award and the American Jewish Historical Society's Saul Viener Prize; and a coeditor of 1929: Mapping the Jewish World (2013), winner of a National Jewish Book Award for anthologies. A Guggenheim Fellow, she has also written about other immigrant groups and the contours of their migration and settlement, including a study of Irish immigrant women and of Irish, Italian, and east European Jewish foodways.

  • A History of, and on, Their Own: Jewish Women in America
  • Fitting Memorials: American Jews Confront the Holocaust, 1945-1962
  • Food and the Making of American Ethnicity
  • The Lower East Side and American Jewry: Bridging History and Memory
  • Wandering Jews: Peddlers and the Discovery of New Worlds

Darren Dochuk

Washington University

Darren Dochuk is an associate professor in the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics and the history department at Washington University in St. Louis. His research and teaching focus on the intersections of religion, politics, and culture in the modern United States, with an emphasis on evangelical Protestantism. His first book, From Bible Belt to Sunbelt: Plain-Folk Religion, Grassroots Politics, and the Rise of Evangelical Conservatism (2011), won the American Historical Association’s John H. Dunning Prize and the OAH Ellis W. Hawley Prize. He is also a coeditor of Sunbelt Rising: The Politics of Space, Place, and Region (2011). He is currently writing a book about religion and the business and culture of oil in American life from 1860 to the present.

  • A Religious History of Pipeline Politics in Modern America
  • Evangelicalism and the Rise of the Sunbelt
  • Oil-Patch Christianity in California and the Southwest
  • Religion, Energy, and Environment in Twentieth-Century America
  • The Christian Right between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan

Gregory Evans Dowd

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Gregory Evans Dowd is a professor of history and chair of the American culture department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His scholarly interests include the study of rumor and the history of the North American Indian East during the colonial, revolutionary, and early national periods. The former director of the university’s Native American studies program, he is the author, most recently, of War under Heaven: Pontiac, The Indian Nations, and the British (2002).

  • Did Tecumseh Stamp his Foot? Earthquakes and Legend in the South
  • Fama and the Founding Father: George Washington and the Problem of Rumor in the Seven Years' War
  • Smallpox on the Tongue: Rumors and Disease on the Early American Frontiers
  • There's Gold in Them There Hills: Rumors of Mineral Riches in Eastern North America, 1500-1840
  • Thinking Outside the Circle: Tecumseh's 1811 Mission

New in 2013 2014Gregory Downs *

City College and Graduate Center, City University of New York

Gregory Downs is an associate professor of history at the City College and Graduate Center, City University of New York. A specialist in post–Civil War history, he is the author of Declarations of Dependence: The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908 (2011) and has written on the interaction between the U.S. Civil War and the Mexican wars of the 1860s. He is currently working on two books: one focuses on occupation and the continuation of war powers at the end of the Civil War and the other places American occupation at the end of that war in the context of the global shift in occupation practices. A prizewinning fiction writer, Downs is also the author of the short-story collection Spit Baths (2006).

  • The Civil War after Appomattox
  • Force, Freedom, and the End of Slavery
  • Reconstruction: The Second American Revolution
  • Custer's Second-to-Last-Stand

New in 2013 2014James Downs *

Connecticut College

James Downs is an associate professor of history at Connecticut College and the author of Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction (2012), which examines the unexpected medical consequences of emancipation. His research uncovered a smallpox epidemic which raged from 1862 to 1870 as well as the history of the Freedmen's Hospitals, the first system of federal health care. His research interests include Civil War and Reconstruction; slavery and emancipation; medicine and public health; and gender and sexuality. Downs blogs for the Huffington Post and his articles have also appeared in the New York Times, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Lancet, among other publications. He is currently working on two book projects. The first is a history of epidemiology with a focus on the nineteenth-century international cholera epidemics. The second is a study of the 1970s, which tells the story of an arson fire in New Orleans in 1973, the largest massacre of gay men in U.S. history; an early version of this research appeared in Time in July 2003.

  • Dying to Be Free: The Smallpox Epidemic during the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Not without My Daughter: The Postwar Underground World of Harriet and Louisa Jacobs
  • The Horror Upstairs: The Largest Massacre of Gay Men in the United States
  • Without a Trace: Same-Sex Sexual Violence on Slave Plantations in the United States, 1607-1861

Don H. Doyle

University of South Carolina

Don H. Doyle is the McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. His latest book, The Cause of All Nations: An International History of America's Civil War (2014), moves beyond the familiar narrative of Civil War battlefields and home front to view the conflict from abroad. He is also the author of Nations Divided: America, Italy, and the Southern Question (2002) and Faulkner's County: The Historical Roots of Yoknapatawpha (2000), and the editor of Nationalism in the New World (2006) and Secession as an International Phenomenon (2010).

  • America's International Civil War
  • Faulkner and Southern History
  • Foreign Interpretations of Lincoln and the American Civil War
  • Garibaldi's Question
  • Secession as an International Phenomenon

Thomas Dublin

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Distinguished Professor of History at the State University of New York at Binghamton, Thomas Dublin is a U.S. social historian with an interest in gender, race and ethnicity, and class in the working-class experience. His research has focused on both the industrial revolution in nineteenth-century New England and deindustrialization in the Middle Atlantic region in the twentieth century. He has been been publishing online for nearly two decades and has pioneered online research and teaching applications, creating an online document archive, Women and Social Movements, International—1840 to Present and coediting Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000, a major online resource in U.S. women's history. He is currently working to apply digital humanities techniques to these projects.

  • Gender and Industrial Decline in the Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania
  • The Anthracite Miners' New Deal: The Thirties
  • The World Wide Web in Research and Teaching: Revolutionary Possibilities
  • U.S. Women's History Online: New Possibilities
  • Women and Early Industrialization: The Lowell Example
  • Women and Social Movements, International: A Transnational Digital Archive

Mary L. Dudziak

Emory University

Mary L. Dudziak is the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law at Emory University, where she also directs the Project on War and Security in Law, Culture, and Society. She is the author of War Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences (2012), Exporting American Dreams: Thurgood Marshall's African Journey (2008), and Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy (2nd edition, 2012). She has also edited September 11 in History: A Watershed Moment? (2003) and coedited Legal Borderlands: Law and the Construction of American Borders (2006). During the 2014-2015 academic year, she is a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. She is writing about war, war powers, and political accountability in twentieth-century U.S. history. Her next book is "Going to War: An American History."

  • Death and the War Power
  • War Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences
  • Civil Rights and the Cold War
  • Exporting American Dreams: Thurgood Marshall's African Journey

Lynn Dumenil

Occidental College

Lynn Dumenil is the Robert Glass Cleland Professor Emerita of American History at Occidental College. She specializes in U.S. cultural and social history since the Civil War. Dumenil is the author of The Modern Temper: American Culture and Society in the 1920s (1995) and Freemasonry and American Culture, 1880-1930 (1984); and a coauthor of Through Women’s Eyes: An American History. She is currently studying American women and World War I.

  • Freemasonry and American Culture, 1880-1930
  • Multicultural Approaches to U.S. History: Ethnic Conflict in the 1920s
  • Rethinking the "Feminine Mystique": American Women in the 1950s
  • The "New Woman" in the 1920s
  • Women, World War I, and the Emergence of Modern America
  • World War I, Voluntarism, and Citizenship

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Erica Armstrong Dunbar

University of Delaware

Erica Armstrong Dunbar focuses on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century African American women's history. Her first book, A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City (2008), was the first book to chronicle the lives of African American women in the North during the early years of the Republic and the years leading to the Civil War. A Philadelphia native, she is an associate professor of black studies and history at the University of Delaware, and she also directs the program in African American history at the Library Company of Philadelphia.

  • African American Women's History
  • African Americans in Philadelphia
  • Slavery and Freedom in the North

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Kathleen DuVal

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Kathleen DuVal teaches early American history and American Indian history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research and writing focus on cross-cultural relations in North America. Her book, The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent (2006), argues that, in the middle of the continent, Indians determined the form and content of their relations with Europeans. She is also a coeditor of Interpreting a Continent: Voices from Colonial America (2009), a collection of primary sources that shows the diversity of colonial America. DuVal is currently writing a book about the American Revolution on the Gulf Coast.

  • American Indians Respond to the Louisiana Purchase
  • Coronado, El Turco, and the Seven Cities of Gold
  • Independence Lost: The Gulf Coast in the American Revolution
  • Indian Intermarriage in Colonial Louisiana
  • Spanish Ambitions and the American Revolution

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Jonathan Earle

Louisiana State University

Jonathan Earle is the Roger Hadfield Ogden Dean of the Honors College at Louisiana State University and the author of the Routledge Atlas of African American History (2000); Jacksonian Antislavery and the Politics of Free Soil (2004), which won the Byron Caldwell Smith Award and the Best First Book Prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic; John Brown's Raid: A Brief History with Documents (2008); and a forthcoming book on the presidential election of 1860. He is also the editor of Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Missouri: The Long Civil War on the Border (2013) and a coeditor, with Sean Wilentz, of Major Problems in the Early Republic (2007).

  • Electing Abraham Lincoln: The Revolution of 1860
  • John Brown, Bleeding Kansas, and the Making of an Irrepressible Conflict

New in 2013 2014Carolyn Eastman *

Virginia Commonwealth University

Carolyn Eastman is an associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research examines how men and women engaged with publications, oratory, and visual imagery during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how those popular media affected their perceptions of self and community as well as the larger political culture. She is the author of the prizewinning A Nation of Speechifiers: Making an American Public after the Revolution (2009). Her current research has focused on two book-length projects. The first unfolds the strange career of an eccentric, drug-addicted, riveting orator in the early nineteenth century. The second asks how ideas about travel—elaborated in popular, richly illustrated volumes—cultivated new ways of seeing strangers and considering the self during the eighteenth century.

  • Her Dangerous Voice: Gender Trouble and Public Outrage in American Women’s History
  • A Nation of Speechifiers: Why (and How) We Should Listen to the Spoken Words of the American Past
  • Fight like a Man: The Antebellum American Peace Movement and Its New Masculinities
  • The Indian Censures the White Man: Americans’ Preoccupation with Indian Eloquence
  • Beware the Abandoned Woman: European Travelers, Native Women, and Interracial Families in Early Atlantic Travelogues

Michael H. Ebner

Lake Forest College

Michael H. Ebner is the James D. Vail III Professor of History Emeritus at Lake Forest College, where he taught from 1974 to 2007. He is best known as the author of the prizewinning Creating Chicago's North Shore: A Suburban History (1988). He has taught in the U.S. Department of Education's Teaching American History initiative in Florida, Minnesota, Illinois, and Virginia and also served as project director of Creating a Geographically Extended Class at Lake Forest College, underwritten by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Ebner is the recipient of awards—as a mentor, as a teacher, and for public service—from the American Historical Association, the Chicago Tribune, the City College of New York, and Lake Forest College, and is a life trustee at the Chicago History Museum. He is currently completing a book entitled “Metropolitan Revisions: Storylines from American History.”

  • A Life of Learning in the Classroom
  • Baseball as History/History as Baseball
  • Heterolocal America: New Immigrants Revising our Metropolitan Regions
  • How the Automobile Transformed the American Metropolis
  • Metropolitan Revisions: Storylines from Twentieth-Century America
  • Teaching American History: What Happens when Professors and Secondary School Educators Converge?

Laura F. Edwards

Duke University

Laura Edwards is a professor of history at Duke University, where she teaches courses on women, gender, and law. Her research focuses on the same issues, with a particular emphasis on the nineteenth-century U.S. South. She is the author of Gendered Strife and Confusion: The Political Culture of Reconstruction (1997), Scarlett Doesn’t Live Here Anymore: Southern Women in the Civil War Era (2000), and The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and the Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary U.S. South (2009) which won the Littleton-Griswold Award from the American Historical Association for the best book in law and society and the Charles S. Sydnor Award from the Southern Historical Association for the best book in southern history. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2012-2013 to complete a new book, “A Nation of Rights: A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction.”

  • Law and Legal Culture in the Antebellum South
  • Law and the Civil War
  • Slaves and Law in the Antebellum South
  • Women in the Civil War South
  • Women, Rights, and Citizenship

David C. Engerman

Brandeis University

David C. Engerman teaches American intellectual and international history at Brandeis University. He is the author of two books on American ideas about Russia: the prizewinning Modernization from the Other Shore: American Intellectuals and the Romance of Russian Development (2003) and Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America’s Soviet Experts (2009). He has edited two volumes on modernization and development programs in the Third World, related to his current research on American and Soviet aid to India during the Cold War.

  • Decolonization and the Cold War
  • Echoes of the Cold War in Twenty-First Century America
  • The Cold War as a Global Conflict
  • The Radical 1950s: Seeds of the Sixties in the Conformist Fifties
  • Universities and the Cold War

Stephen D. Engle

Florida Atlantic University

Stephen D. Engle is a professor of history, and the director of the Alan B. Larkin Symposium on the American Presidency, at Florida Atlantic University. A former Fulbright Scholar and a recent lecturer for the Smithsonian Institution's Associates Program, he is the author of several books, including the forthcoming "Gathering to Save a Nation: War Governors, Lincoln, and the Politics of Necessity."

  • All the President's Statesmen: Abraham Lincoln, Union Governors, and the Negotiation of Power in the Civil War
  • German Ethnic Identity in the American Civil War
  • Struggle for the Heartland: The Civil War in the West Revisited
  • Three Kinds of History: Teaching An Unpredictable Past

Nan Enstad

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Nan Enstad is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she teaches courses in gender history, cultural history, and transnational methods. She is the author of Ladies of Labor, Girls of Adventure: Working Women, Popular Culture, and Labor Politics at the Turn of the Twentieth Century (1999) and is writing a book tentatively entitled “The Jim Crow Cigarette: Following Tobacco Road from North Carolina to China and Back.” Her work presents a cultural history of the corporation as a defining but, until recently, largely naturalized aspect of American life.

  • A Biography of Corporate Personhood and the Wisconsin Uprising of 2011
  • American Dreamers and Global Cigarettes: Seeing the Corporation as an Art Form, 1890-1940
  • Jazz Incorporations: How Cigarette Companies Became Instrumental in Global Jazz Cultures
  • The Global Uses of Southern Identity: Race and Modernity in the United States and China
  • The Modern Girl Smokes Cigarettes: Colonial Modernity in the U.S. South and China

Glenn T. Eskew

Georgia State University

Glenn T. Eskew has an abiding interest in southern history having taught the subject at Georgia State University since 1993. He has published a variety of essays and books focusing on race relations since the Civil War. His But For Birmingham: The Local and National Movements in the Civil Rights Struggle (1997) received the Francis Butler Simkins Prize of the Southern Historical Association and Longwood College for the best book in southern history by a new author. He is currently editing Savannah lyricist Johnny Mercer’s unpublished autobiography and studying civil rights monuments and institutions in the Deep South. Eskew serves on a number of national, regional, state, and local boards, and promotes historic preservation by working to restore nineteenth-century structures and landscapes in the state.

  • Civil Rights Memorials
  • The Life and Career of Johnny Mercer

Todd Estes

Oakland University

Todd Estes is an associate professor and chair of the history department at Oakland University. His research concentrates on early U.S. political history and political culture, and he is the author of The Jay Treaty Debate, Public Opinion, and the Evolution of Early American Political Culture (2006). He is currently researching a book on the ratification debate, tentatively entitled "The Campaign for the Constitution: Political Culture and the Ratification Contest." He has won a couple of teaching prizes, including the Oakland University Teaching Excellence Award.

  • "Huggermuggered and Suppressed": Hardball Politics and the Ratification of the Constitution
  • From Celebrated Hero to Dangerous Outcast: Thomas Paine's Journey and the Course of Early American Democracy
  • How Politics Worked 200 Years Ago and How It Compares to Politics Today
  • James Madison and the Constitution: A Case of Reluctant Paternity?
  • The Jay Treaty Debate and the Evolving Culture of Politics in the Early Republic
  • Why The Federalist Papers Are Overrated: Putting an American Classic Back into Historical Context

Nicole Eustace

New York University

Nicole Eustace is a professor of history at New York University, where she has leadership roles in both the history of women and gender program and the Atlantic history workshop. A historian of eighteenth-century British America and the early United States, she is the author of Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (2008) and 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism (2012), and a coeditor of the forthcoming "Warring for America, 1803–1818." She has a particular interest in the history of emotion.

  • "Charges Most Wounding to the Feelings of a Soldier": The Passions of Patriotism and the Court Martial of General William Hull
  • A Passion for Liberty: Emotional Rhetoric and the American Revolution
  • Emotion and Patriotism in the War of 1812: Social and Cultural Effects of the War
  • Passion and Political Economy: Romantic Arguments for Early American Expansionism

C. Wyatt Evans

Drew University

C. Wyatt Evans has taught American history at Drew University since 2003. Prior to that, he served as a civil affairs officer in the U.S. Army and as a Peace Corps volunteer in central Africa. His research and teaching interests include Civil War memory, civilian dislocation and domestic security during the Civil War, and leadership in American democracy. He is also very involved in developing new approaches for teaching history to address the changing learning landscape brought on by the digital revolution and globalization. He is the author of The Legend of John Wilkes Booth: Myth, Memory, and a Mummy (2004), which won the OAH Avery O. Craven Award; “Lafayette Baker and Security in the Civil War North” in North and South Magazine (2008); and “The Lincoln-Obama Moment,” in Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial (2011). He is currently researching a book on the wartime career of Union chief detective Lafayette Baker.

  • Alexis de Tocqueville on Leadership and Democracy
  • Civilian Dislocation Then and Now: What the Current Global Refugee Crisis Can Teach Us about the Civil War
  • Teaching American History in the Global/Digital Era: Thoughts from the College Classroom
  • Teaching History to the Digital Natives
  • The Emancipation Proclamation: Process and Intent
  • The History of Leadership in the United States: Gentlemen, Jacksonians, and Meritocrats
  • The Wartime Exploits of Lafayette Baker: Telegraphs, Railroads, and Saucy Southern Belles
  • Using History to Teach Math: How the Study of the Past Can Address Quantitative Illiteracy

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New in 2013 2014Ann Fabian *

Rutgers University

Ann Fabian is a Distinguished Professor of history at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. She is the author of Card Sharps, Dream Books, and Bucket Shops: Gambling in 19th-Century America (1990); The Unvarnished Truth: Personal Narratives in Nineteenth-Century America (2000); and The Skull Collectors: Race, Science, and America's Unburied Dead (2010). She has published essays on the "Kennewick Man," Hurricane Katrina, ruined banks, and images of everyday life from the 1930s. She is coediting a volume of essays with Mia Bay on race and retail in the contemporary United States and is also working on a book on the history of natural history.

  • Race, Science, and Human Remains
  • Collecting Frogs and Toads: Tales from the Archives of the American Museum of Natural History
  • Amos Eaton's Clouds: Naturalists in the Early American Republic

Alice Fahs

University of California, Irvine

Alice Fahs is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. The author of The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and the South, 1861-1865 (2000), she is interested in a broad view of American cultural history, including popular culture, print culture, and the market as well as more traditional subjects of intellectual inquiry. Most recently, she published an edition of Hospital Sketches (2003), Louisa May Alcott’s classic account of her nursing experiences during the Civil War, and a study of late-nineteenth-century American society and culture entitled Out on Assignment: Newspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public Space (2011).

  • Newspaper Women and the Making of the Modern, 1885-1910
  • The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature and the Meanings of the Nation, 1861-1865
  • Women and the Civil War

Candace Falk

Emma Goldman Papers, University of California, Berkeley

Candace Falk is a Guggenheim Fellow and the founding director of the Emma Goldman Papers research project as the University of California, Berkeley. Her interest in feminism and antiwar activities led to her research on Goldman. The author of Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman (1984), she is editing a four-volume collection of Goldman’s papers, Emma Goldman: A Documentary History of the American Years, which includes Made for America, 1890–1901 (2003, revised edition, 2008), Making Speech Free, 1902–1909 (2004, revised edition, 2008), and Light and Shadows, 1910–1916 (2012).

  • "How Powerful is the Ideal, Sweeping across Space and Time": Emma Goldman and Anarchist Precedents to the Global Occupy Movements
  • Deported But Not Defeated: Emma Goldman during World War I
  • Nearer My Subject to Thee: Reflections of a Biographer, Historian, and Documentary Editor
  • Passion, Politics, and Free Expression: The Legacy of Emma Goldman
  • Redefining Patriotism: Immigrant Radicalism (1890-1919)
  • To Dream of Becoming a Judith: The Jewish Roots of Emma Goldman's Anarchism
  • Undocumented Workers: Hidden Histories of Labor Radicalism from America's Turbulent Past

New in 2013 2014John Fea *

Messiah College

John Fea is a professor of history and chair of the history department at Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. A scholar of early American history and American religious history, he is the author of several books, most notably Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?: A Historical Introduction (2011), which was one of three finalists for the George Washington Book Prize. He is also the author of the award-winning The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian and the Rural Enlightenment in Early America (2009). His most recent book is Why Study History?: Reflecting on the Importance of the Past (2013). His work has appeared in publications as wide-ranging as the Journal of American History and the Washington Post. He lectures at colleges and universities, historical societies, and religious organizations and blogs daily at www.philipvickersfithian.com.

  • Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?
  • Philip Vickers Fithian: Coming of Age in the American Enlightenment
  • Land of Light and Liberty: The Presbyterian Rebellion of 1776
  • The Greenwich Tea Burning: History and Memory in an American Town
  • How to Be a Public Scholar

Daniel Feller

University of Tennessee

Daniel Feller is a professor of history and the editor and director of the Papers of Andrew Jackson at the University of Tennessee. His books include The Jacksonian Promise: America, 1815-1840 (1995) and an annotated abridgement of Harriet Martineau’s Retrospect of Western Travel (2000). He was the lead scholar for the pbs biography “Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil, and the Presidency” and has been featured on the pbs series “History Detectives.” Feller and his team have published three presidential volumes of the Jackson Papers, covering the years 1829 through 1831.

  • Andrew Jackson, Indian Removal, and the Trail of Tears
  • Democratic Science: The Politics of Knowledge in Jacksonian America
  • Passion, Prejudice, and Policy: Andrew Jackson in the White House
  • The People's Will Denied? Backroom Politics and the Election of 1824
  • The Presidency of Andrew Jackson: New Light from His Papers

John Ferling

University of West Georgia

John Ferling, a professor emeritus at the University of West Georgia, has written on topics ranging from warfare in colonial America to the lives of the Founders. In addition to biographies of George Washington, John Adams, and the Loyalist Joseph Galloway, he is the author of the award-winning Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence (2007) and A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic (2003). His other books include Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 (2004), The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon (2009), and Jefferson and Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation(2013).

  • America's First Pivotal Election: The Election of 1800
  • General Washington: Fortunate to Have Had Him, Lucky to Have Survived Him
  • Jefferson and Hamilton: Their Great Rivalry
  • The Struggle to Declare American Independence

Sharla Fett

Occidental College

Sharla Fett is an associate professor and the chair of the history department at Occidental College. She teaches courses on early U.S. and Atlantic World slavery as well as race, gender, and health. Her first book, Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations (2002), received the OAH James A. Rawley Prize, the Southern Association for Women Historians’ Willie Lee Rose and Julia Cherry Spruill Prizes, and the Southern Historical Association’s Frank L. and Harriet Owsley Prize. Currently, she is working on a book tentatively entitled "Double Crossings: Liberated Africans and the Racial Politics of U.S. Slavery Suppression in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World."

  • "You Just Had to Depend on Yourself": Self-Reliance and the Healing Work of Enslaved Women
  • Community, Calling, and Consciousness: Southern Black Midwifery and the Politics of Health
  • From the Amistad to the Wildfire: Northern Black Activists Confront the Illegal Transatlantic Slave Trade
  • The First Battle of Fort Sumter: Liberated Africans in 1850s Proslavery South Carolina
  • Social Death and Social Life in Recaptive African Forced Migrations

New in 2013 2014Mark Fiege *

Colorado State University

Mark Fiege is the author of The Republic of Nature: An Environmental History of the United States (2012) and Irrigated Eden: The Making of an Agricultural Landscape in the American West (1999), which received the Forest History Society's Charles A. Weyerhaeuser Book Award. His article "The Weedy West," published in the Western Historical Quarterly (2005), won several honors, including the American Society for Environmental History's Alice Hamilton Prize. A professor of history at Colorado State University, he is a founding member of the Public Lands History Center and a participant in Parks as Portals to Learning, a research and learning program based on environmental history that brings together faculty, students, and resource managers at Rocky Mountain National Park. His current research includes a book on conservation in the national parks.

  • Land of Lincoln: Environmental History and the Sixteenth President
  • The Republic of Nature: American History as Environmental History
  • Elegant Conservation: Management in a Time of Unprecedented Uncertainty
  • Environmental History and the National Parks

Barbara J. Fields

Columbia University

Barbara J. Fields is a professor of history at Columbia University where she has taught since 1986. Her research and teaching focus on nineteenth-century American southern and social history; the Civil War and Reconstruction; comparative history of emancipation; comparative social history of agriculture; comparative history of transitions to capitalism; slavery; and the art of interpretive writing. She is the author of Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century (1985) and a coauthor of Free at Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War (1992) and Slaves No More: Three Essays on Emancipation and the Civil War (1992), among other books. Her most recent book, written with her sister, sociologist Karen E. Fields, is Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life (2012). She is also president of the Southern Historical Association.

  • Racecraft and History
  • War, Politics, and Slavery
  • Was Emancipation a War Crime?
  • Who Cared about States' Rights?

Jill Fields

California State University, Fresno

Jill Fields is a professor of history and the founding coordinator of the Jewish studies certificate program at California State University, Fresno, where she teaches U.S. women's, social, and cultural history. She is the author of An Intimate Affair: Women, Lingerie, and Sexuality (2007), which won the Western Association of Women Historians' Keller-Sierra Book Prize, and the editor of Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, the Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists (2012). Fields is currently writing "Fashion in World History" for the supplemental textbook series, Themes in World History, and developing a book-length project in the field of gender and Jewish cultural studies. Her recent article, "Was Peggy Guggenheim Jewish?: Art Collecting and Representations of Jewish Identity in and out of Postwar Venice," was published in Nashim: A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues (Fall 5774/2013). Fields is also working with community activists to preserve Fresno's historic Fulton Mall. Designed in 1964 by renowned modernist landscape architect Garret Eckbo and further enhanced by mosaics, fountains, and statues, the mall is one of few parks in downtown Fresno.

  • Judy Chicago, the Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists
  • Peggy Guggenheim, Jewish Identity, and Modern Art in Post-War Venice
  • The Business of Fashion in Hollywood Films

Eileen J. Findlay

The American University

Eileen J. Findlay is an associate professor of Latin American and Caribbean history at American University, having recently served a two-year special appointment as the Clendenen Professor of Women's and Gender History there. She is the author of Imposing Decency: The Politics of Sexuality and Race in Puerto Rico, 1870–1920 (1999) and the forthcoming book, "'We Are Left without a Father Here': Masculinity, Domesticity, and Migration in Post-War Puerto Rico." In her article, “Courtroom Tales of Sex and Honor: Rapto and Rape in Late Nineteenth-Century Puerto Rico,” published in Honor, Status, and the Law in Modern Latin America (2005), Findlay began to explore her current interest in laboring people's artistic and political shaping of oral narratives. She has continued these investigations through three oral history projects from which she has published a number of articles: one with Cuban ex-revolutionaries living in Miami, Florida; another with Central American immigrants to Washington, D.C.; and a third with Nuyorican return migrants to Puerto Rico.

  • Archives and Nationalism in the Writing of Puerto Rican History
  • Failed Fathers or Respectable Patriarchs? Shifting Representations of Puerto Ricans in Post-war U.S. Print Media
  • Gender and Degraded Citizenships: Mexican-Americans' and Puerto Ricans' Encounters in the Rural, Mid-twentieth-century U.S. Midwest
  • Revolutionary Love: Commitment and Disillusion in 1990s Cuban Émigrés' Life Stories

Paul Finkelman

Albany Law School

Paul Finkelman is the President William McKinley Professor of Law and Public Policy and senior fellow in the Government Law Center at Albany Law School. He has published more than twenty-five books, more than one hundred and fifty articles, and numerous op-eds on the law of American slavery, the First Amendment, American race relations, American legal history, the U.S. Constitution, freedom of religion, and baseball and the law. Briefs to the U.S. Supreme Court have cited his work on religion and legal history as well as on the history of the second amendment. He was the chief expert witness in the Alabama Ten Commandments monument case. He was also an expert witness in the lawsuit over the ownership of Barry Bonds’ 73rd homerun. In 2009, he helped secure a posthumous pardon for the Griffin Brothers, two African American men wrongly executed in South Carolina in 1915. He most recently published a biography of Millard Fillmore in the “American Presidents” series edited by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. and Sean Wilentz.

  • "A Well Regulated Militia": The Original Meaning of the Second Amendment
  • Abraham Lincoln: Lawyer as Great Emancipator
  • Baseball and the Rule of Law
  • Civil Liberties in Times of Crisis
  • Civil Liberties in Wartime: Lessons from Lincoln
  • Guilty Until Posthumously Pardoned: The Griffin Brothers Pardon Case and the Use of History to Right Past Wrongs
  • Ten Commandment Monuments in the Public Square: Separation of Church and State in Historical and Modern Perspectives
  • The Civil War as a Constitutional Crisis
  • The Closing of the African Slave Trade: Congress, the Courts, and the Limits of Reform
  • The Dred Scott Case, 150 Years Later
  • Thomas Jefferson, the American Founders, and the Problem of Slavery in a "Free" Republic
  • Understanding Our Proslavery Constitution
  • Was John Brown America's First Terrorist?
  • What Really Caused the Civil War?

Deborah K. Fitzgerald

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Deborah K. Fitzgerald is the Kenan Sahin Dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at MIT, a position she has held since 2006, as well as a professor of the history of technology in the program in science, technology, and society there. A leading historian of American agriculture, she is the author of Every Farm a Factory: The Industrial Ideal in American Agriculture (2003), which won the Theodore Saloutos Prize, and The Business of Breeding: Hybrid Corn in Illinois, 1890-1940 (1990). She is currently working on a book that examines the role of World War II in fundamentally reshaping the food industry and the nature of global food chains. A past president of the Agricultural History Society, she is also active in the Society for the History of Technology and the Environmental History Society.

  • Convenience and the Food Industry in World War II
  • Industrializing Everything: Agriculture in Twentieth-Century America

Ellen Fitzpatrick

University of New Hampshire

Ellen Fitzpatrick is a professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, where she received the Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Public Service. She is the author or the editor of several books including New York Times bestseller, Letters to Jackie: Condolences from a Grieving Nation (2010), History’s Memory: Writing America’s Past, 1880-1980 (2002), Endless Crusade: Women Social Scientists and Progressive Reform (1990), and a textbook, coauthored with Alan Brinkley, America in Modern Times (1996).

  • The Kennedy Assassination: Reflections Fifty Years Later
  • The Kennedy Presidency in Historical Perspective
  • What Americans Saw in John F. Kennedy

Donald L. Fixico

Arizona State University

Donald L. Fixico (Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Creek, and Seminole) from Oklahoma is Distinguished Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University. A former Newberry Fellow and Ford Fellow, he is the author and editor of more than a dozen books, including Indian Resilience and Rebuilding: Indigenous Nations in the Modern American West (2013), Call for Change: The Medicine Way of American Indian History, Ethos, and Reality (2013), American Indians in a Modern World (2008), Daily Life of Native Americans in the Twentieth Century (2007), The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge (2003), The Urban Indian Experience in America (2000), The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century: Tribal Natural Resources and American Capitalism (1998), and Termination and Relocation: Federal Indian Policy, 1945-1960 (1986). He is also the editor of the three-volume Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty (2007) and Rethinking American Indian History (1997). He has lectured throughout the United States and internationally in Japan, China, Finland, England, Germany, Canada, and the Netherlands.

  • American Indian Oral Tradition: Myths, Legends, and Native Reality
  • Rebuilding Indian Nations from the Twentieth Century to the Present
  • Gaming in Indian Country
  • Native Americans, Natural Resources, and the Environment
  • The American Indian Mind in a Linear World
  • The Modern Indian from Relocation to Cities

Michael W. Flamm

Ohio Wesleyan University

Michael W. Flamm has taught modern U.S. history at Ohio Wesleyan University since 1998. He is the author of Law and Order: Street Crime, Civil Unrest, and the Crisis of Liberalism in the 1960s (2005) and a coauthor of Debating the 1960s (2007), Debating the Reagan Presidency (2009), and the Chicago Handbook for Teachers (2011). On behalf of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, he offers summer seminars for precollegiate teachers on numerous eras and topics. He has won several teaching awards and has served as a Fulbright scholar and senior specialist in Argentina.

  • The 1960s: Controversies and Legacies
  • The New Right in Historical Perspective
  • The Reagan Presidency: Controversies and Legacies

Neil Foley

Southern Methodist University

Neil Foley holds the Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in American History at Southern Methodist University where he teaches twentieth-century U.S. history, immigration (particularly from Mexico), race and ethnicity in the American West, Latino history, and comparative civil rights politics. He has lectured widely in Europe, the United States, and Latin America, and has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, Fulbright Scholar Program (Berlin and Mexico City), Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Ford Foundation. He is the author of Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity (2010), Latino USA: Mexicans in the Making of America (2014), and The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in Texas (1997), which won the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award as well as awards from the Southern Historical Association, American Historical Association, and Western Historical Association, and the Gustavus Meyers Outstanding Book Award for the Study of Human Rights in North America.

  • Hispanic Immigration and the Changing Face of America
  • Latino Civil Rights in Post-World War II America
  • Brown vs. Black: The Future of African American and Latino Relations

Lacy K. Ford

University of South Carolina

Lacy K. Ford is senior vice provost and a professor of history at the University of South Carolina, where he teaches nineteenth- and twentieth-century southern and U.S. history. His most recent book, Deliver Us From Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South (2009), and his 2008 Journal of American History article, "Reconfiguring the Old South: Solving the Problem of Slavery, 1787-1838," (featured on the 'Teaching the JAH' web project), focus on the emergence of a distinct paternalist ideology in the Old South and its evolving influence on white southern society. Ford also maintains a research focus on the economy of the modern South.

  • Paternalism after Its Triumph: The White Mission to the Slaves in Late Antebellum Charleston
  • The Crisis in Economic Development Policy in the Twenty-First Century South: South Carolina as a Test Case
  • The Impact of Globalization on Economic Development in the Modern South
  • The Paternalist Insurgency in the Old South, 1800-1840
  • The Slavery Question in the Old South: Evolving White Attitudes, 1787-1840

Catherine Forslund

Rockford University

Catherine Forslund is Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, a professor of history, and the chair of the history department at Rockford University, where she teaches U. S., Latin American, and Asian history and has worked extensively with local Teaching American History grant programs. Her publications include works in diplomatic and women’s history such as We Are a College at War: Women Working for Victory in World War II (2010), Anna Chennault: Informal Diplomacy and Asian Relations (2002), and “Worth a Thousand Words: Editorial Cartoons of the Korean War” in the Journal of Conflict Studies (vol. 22, 2002). Her recent research interests include Edith Roosevelt and Vietnam War–era editorial cartoons.

  • The Rise of the Modern First Lady: Edith Kermit Roosevelt, a Victorian Modern in the White House
  • We Are a College at War: American Women in World War II
  • Woman of Two Worlds: Anna Chennault, Informal Diplomacy, and U.S.-Asian Relations

New in 2013 2014Thomas A. Foster *

DePaul University

Thomas A. Foster (@ThomasAFoster) is the author of Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past (2014) and Sex and the Eighteenth-Century Man: Massachusetts and the History of Sexuality in America (2006). He is the editor of Women in Early America (2015); Documenting Intimate Matters: Primary Sources for a History of Sexuality in America (2012); New Men: Manliness in Early America (2011); and Long Before Stonewall: Histories of Same-Sex Sexuality in Early America (2007).

  • Sexuality and Gender in Early America
  • Public Memory of the Private Lives of the Founding Fathers
  • Early American LGBTQ History

Steve Fraser

Independent historian

Steve Fraser is a historian, writer, and editor. His research and writing have pursued two main lines of inquiry: labor history and the history of American capitalism. His first book, The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order (1989), coedited with Gary Gerstle, examines the relationship between the New Deal and the rise of the modern labor movement. His later works, including Wall Street: America’s Dream Palace (2008) and Every Man a Speculator: A History of Wall Street in American Life (2005), explore the ways American society and culture reacted to the presence of powerful economic elites. He currently teaches at Columbia University and has taught at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and New York University. He has also worked as an editor for Cambridge University Press, Basic Books, and Houghton Mifflin.

  • A Comparison of America's Two Gilded Ages
  • A Cultural History of Wall Street
  • A Historigraphical Look at Wealth and Power in a Democracy
  • The Rise and Fall of the Labor Question in American Public Life

Ernest Freeberg

University of Tennessee

A Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the history department at the University of Tennessee, Ernest Freeberg specializes in American social and cultural history, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His first book, The Education of Laura Bridgman (2001), winner of the American Historical Association’s Dunning Prize, explores the antebellum philosophical and religious controversies raised by the education of the first deaf-blind person to learn language. His Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent (2008), a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist, examines the imprisonment of socialist leader Debs and the national debate prompted by demands for his amnesty. Most recently, he is the author of The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America (2013), which examines the impact of electric light on American culture.

  • Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America, 1870–1940
  • Before Helen Keller: The Education of Laura Bridgman, First Deaf and Blind Person to Learn Language
  • Eugene V. Debs and the Struggle for Free Speech

Joanne B. Freeman

Yale University

Joanne B. Freeman is a professor of history at Yale University. She specializes in the politics and political culture of early national and antebellum America. She has appeared in numerous television documentaries on pbs and the History Channel, and has served as an historical adviser for the National Park Service. She is the author of Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic (2001), which won the best book award from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, and Alexander Hamilton: Writings (2001). Her newest project is a book on physical violence in the U. S. Congress between 1830 and the Civil War, entitled "The Field of Blood: Congressional Violence in Antebellum America."

  • Dirty Nasty Politics in Early America
  • Dueling as Politics: Reinterpreting the Burr-Hamilton Duel
  • On the Trail of Alexander Hamilton
  • The Field of Blood: Congressional Violence in Antebellum America
  • Thomas Jefferson, Politician

François Furstenberg

Johns Hopkins University

François Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at Johns Hopkins University, is the author of In the Name of the Father: Washington's Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation (2006). His latest book, When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation (2014), follows a group of French émigrés to the United States to explore broader connections between France and the United States in the age of the French Revolution.

  • After the Revolution: The Formation of Early American Nationalism
  • France and America in the Age of Revolutions
  • International Land Speculation in the Early Republic
  • Slavery and Early American Nationalism
  • The Western Frontier in the Early American Republic
  • When the United States Spoke French: The Early American Republic in the Age of the French Revolution

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New in 2013 2014Kevin Gaines *

University of Michigan

Kevin Gaines is the Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of history and Afroamerican and African studies at the University of Michigan. His interests include U.S. and African American intellectual and cultural history; race and gender politics in post–World War II America; African American cultural production; and global dimensions of the African American freedom movement. He is the author of Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture during the Twentieth Century (1996), winner of the American Studies Association's John Hope Franklin Publication Prize; American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates in the Civil Rights Era (2006); and the forthcoming book, "The African American Journey: A Global History." He is also a past president of the American Studies Association.

  • The U.S. Civil Rights Movement through Music
  • "New York is like Johannesburg": The Global Dimensions of the African American Freedom Movement
  • American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era

New in 2013 2014Mario T. García *

University of California Santa Barbara

Mario T. García is a professor of Chicano studies and history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of numerous books on Chicano history including Desert Immigrants: The Mexicans of El Paso, 1880–1920 (1981); Mexican Americans: Leadership, Ideology, and Identity, 1930–1960 (1991); Memories of Chicano History: The Life and Narrative of Bert Corona (1995); Catolicos: Resistance and Affirmation in Chicano Catholic History (2008); Blowout! Sal Castro and the Chicano Struggle for Educational Justice (2011); and The Latino Generation: Voices of the New America (2014).

  • Education and the Chicano/Latino Experience: A Historical Perspective
  • The Chicano in American History
  • The Contemporary Immigration Debate: A Historical Perspective
  • The Latino Generation: Voices of the New America

Matt Garcia

Arizona State University

Matt Garcia is the director of the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University, where he also directs the comparative border studies program. Originally from California, he previously taught at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, the University of Oregon, and Brown University. He is the author of A World of Its Own: Race, Labor and Citrus in the Making of Greater Los Angeles, 1900-1970 (2001), which won the Oral History Association's best book award, and, most recently, From the Jaws of Victory: The Triumph and Tragedy of Cesar Chavez and the Farm Worker Movement (2012), which won the Philip Taft Award for the best book in labor history. Garcia was also the outreach director and coprimary investigator for the Bracero Archive Project, which received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant as well as a Best Public History Award from the National Council for Public History.

  • Beyond the Legend: Cesar Chavez, Charismatic Leadership, and the Relevance of Accountability
  • “Capitalism in Reverse”: The United Farm Workers’ Grape Boycott and the Power of Interracial Community Organizing

Edith B. Gelles

Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University

Edith B. Gelles is a senior scholar with the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. For thirty years, her research has focused on women in colonial America and especially on Abigail Adams and her family. She has written two biographies of Abigail: Portia: World of Abigail Adams (1992), which the American Historical Association's Herbert Feis Award, and Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage (2009), which was a finalist for the George Washington Prize. She has also edited and written an extensive introduction to The Letters of Abigaill Levy Franks, 1733-1748 (2004), the earliest surviving corpus by a woman in the colonial western world. She is currently editing a volume of Abigail Adams's letters for the Library of America and working on a biography of Henrietta Szold. Gelles has taught American women's history as well as the survey of world history, and she has appeared on several television documentaries, including the recent CNN series on First Ladies.

  • The World of Abigail Adams
  • Abigail and John Adams: Portrait of a Marriage
  • An American Dynasty: Abigail and John, Louisa and John Quincy

Gary Gerstle

Gary Gerstle is the James Stahlman Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. He works on the twentieth-century United States, with a particular focus on how the United States periodically reconfigures its boundaries and national identity to open or close itself to immigrants and other minorities in its midst. His book, American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century (2001), won the Saloutos Prize for outstanding work in immigration and ethnic history and was recently named by npr’s Fresh Air as a “Best Book for a Transformative 2008.” Gerstle also works on the history of American politics: social and labor movements, liberalism and the New Deal Order, and the nature of the American state. His current projects include a comparative and transnational history of race and nation in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba, and a book on the character and uses of state power in U.S. history. Gerstle has been awarded many fellowships and elected to the Society of American Historians.

  • America's Encounter with Immigrants
  • Minorities and Multiculturalism and the Presidency of George W. Bush
  • Race, Nation, and the American Presidency
  • The State and Democracy in America

Lori D. Ginzberg

Penn State University

Lori D. Ginzberg is a professor of history and women’s studies at Penn State University. Her work focuses on the intellectual history and political identities of nineteenth-century women. The author of four books, she has long been fascinated by the ways ideologies about gender obscure the material and ideological realities of class, how women of different groups express political identities, and the ways that commonsense notions of American life shape, contain, and control radical ideas. Her books include Women and the Work of Benevolence: Morality, Politics, and Class in the Nineteenth-Century United States (1990), Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman’s Rights in Antebellum New York (2005), and most recently, Elizabeth Cady Stanton: An American Life (2009). She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2012–2013.

  • "A Very Radical Proposition": Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Meanings of the Vote
  • Living Large: The Life and Thought of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
  • Untidy Origins: Women's Political Identities in the Nineteenth Century

Joseph T. Glatthaar

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Joseph T. Glatthaar is the Stephenson Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he teaches classes in American military history and the Civil War. He uses military history to understand or highlight certain aspects of society and culture, and, most recently, he has become intrigued with the idea of employing qualitative and quantitative evidence to help understand important aspects of the Civil War. He is the author of several books including General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Defeat (2008).

  • "Rich Man's War and Poor Man's Fight"? The Army of Northern Virginia as a Case Study
  • Abraham Lincoln and U.S. Grant: A Model Civil-Military Relationship
  • Black Soldiers in the Civil War
  • Robert E. Lee and Confederate Defeat

Susan A. Glenn

University of Washington

Susan A. Glenn is the Howard and Frances Keller Endowed Professor in the history department at the University of Washington. Her research and teaching have focused on twentieth-century American cultural and social history, and she has been particularly interested in the foundations and transformations of group identities. She began her career as a social historian concerned primarily with the effects of large-scale social and economic processes—migration, industrial wage work, labor organizing—on group identity, which was the topic of her first book, Daughters of the Shtetl: Life and Labor in the Immigrant Generation (1990). Her approach shifted to focus on the cultural and intellectual materials through which social groups have attempted to define and represent themselves within the broader public culture, the subject of her book, Female Spectacle: The Theatrical Roots of Modern Feminism (2000). Her recent work explores some fundamental Jewish debates, anxieties, and taboos about who Jews are and what makes them different from, similar to, or the same as other Americans. She is also the coeditor, with Naomi B. Sokoloff, of Boundaries of Jewish Identity (2010), a collection of essays by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists, and literary critics who offer comparative perspectives on who and what is “Jewish” in the United States, Israel, and Europe.

  • "Funny, You Don't Look Jewish": Stereotypes and the Making of Modern Jewish Ethnicity
  • How Far Can Jews Wander? The Paradoxes of Modern Identity
  • The "Jewish" Cold War in America: Anxiety and Identity in the Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • The Jew as Other: Antisemitism in America
  • The Theatrical Roots of Modern Feminism

Lawrence B. Glickman

Cornell University

Lawrence B. Glickman is a professor of history at Cornell University. Prior to joining Cornell's history department in 2014, he was the Carolina Trustee Professor and chair of the history department at the University of South Carolina, where he had taught since 1992. He teaches courses on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, consumer society in comparative perspective, and the United States since the Civil War. He is the author or editor of four books, including Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America (2009) and Consumer Society in American History: A Reader (1999). Interested in cultural history, he has coedited, with James W. Cook and Michael O'Malley, The Cultural Turn in U.S. History: Past, Present, and Future (2008) and is currently researching and writing a book called, "The Free Enterprise System: A Cultural History."

  • "Buy for the Sake of the Slave": How Abstemious Abolitionists (and Southern Nationalists) Invented Modern Consumer Activism
  • Bernard Baruch and the Transformation of American Liberalism
  • Rethinking Consumer Politics in American History
  • The Forgotten Debate about "Public Spending" and "National Purpose": Lessons from the 1950s
  • The Rhetoric of "Free Enterprise" from the New Deal to the Present

Thavolia Glymph

Duke University

Thavolia Glymph is an associate professor of history and African and African American studies at Duke University where she teaches courses on slavery, the U.S. South, emancipation, Reconstruction, and African American women’s history. She is the author of Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household (2008) and a coeditor of two volumes of Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867 (Ser. 1, Vols. 1 and 3, 1985 and 1990), a part of the Freedmen and Southern Society Project. She is currently completing “Women at War,” a study of women in the Civil War.

  • Emancipation and the Meaning of Freedom
  • Enslaved Women and the Civil War
  • Land and Labor in the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Slaveholding Mistresses and Enslaved Women in the Plantation Household
  • Women and the Civil War "Homefronts"

David Goldfield

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

David Goldfield is the Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the editor of the Journal of Urban History. He is the author of Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations and Southern Culture (1990), which received the Mayflower Award for Nonfiction and the Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights; Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History (2002); Southern Histories: Public, Personal, and Sacred (2003); and the widely acclaimed America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation (2011).

  • After Civil Rights: Contemporary Race Relations in the American South
  • God Bless the South: Religion and Southern Culture in the Twentieth Century
  • How the Civil War Created a Nation
  • Practicing Public History in Courtrooms and Museums: A Personal Perspective
  • The Evangelical Origins of the Civil War
  • The New Immigration and Race Relations in the United States Today
  • Waving the Confederate Battle Flag: The Uses and Misuses of Southern History

Risa L. Goluboff

University of Virginia

Risa L. Goluboff’s scholarship focuses on the history of civil rights, labor, and constitutional law in the twentieth century. Her first book, The Lost Promise of Civil Rights (2007), won the Order of the Coif Book Award and the Law and Society Association’s James Willard Hurst Prize. She is also a coeditor of Civil Rights Stories (2008) and received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in Constitutional Studies to support her current work on the demise of vagrancy laws as part of the social transformations of the 1960s. A professor of law and history at the University of Virginia, she received its All-University Teaching Award in 2011.

  • Civil Rights before Brown v. Board of Education
  • Involuntary Servitude from the Civil War to World War II
  • The Legal History of the 1960s
  • The New Constitutional History
  • Vagrancy Law and Its Downfall in the 1960s

Laura E. Gómez

University of California Los Angeles

Laura E. Gómez is a professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she also holds courtesy appointments in the sociology and Chicana/Chicano studies departments. Her scholarship has focused on the intersection of law, politics, and race and gender stratification in both contemporary and historical contexts. A past president of the Law and Society Association, she is the author of Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race (2007), which examines how law and racial ideology intersected to create new racial groups and to restructure the turn-of-the-century racial order, and a coeditor of Mapping “Race”: Critical Approaches to Health Disparities Research (2013).

  • Manifest Destinies Revisited: The Historic Origins of the Mexican American Population and Implications for Today
  • Mexican Americans and the Opposite One-Drop Rule: Reconceiving Nineteenth-Century Race Relations
  • The History of Resistance to New Mexico Statehood: Lessons for 2012

New in 2013 2014Adam Goodheart *

Washington College

Historian and journalist Adam Goodheart is the author of the New York Times bestselling book 1861: The Civil War Awakening (2011). The book was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in history and was named Book of the Year by the History Book Club. It was also cited among the best books of the year by the New York Times, The Atlantic, Kirkus Reviews, and Slate, among others. Goodheart teaches history and American studies at Washington College, where he also directs the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience. His articles appear frequently in National Geographic, Smithsonian, and the New York Times Magazine, among other publications, and he has made many broadcast media appearances. President Barack Obama invited him to witness the executive order signing ceremony that declared Fort Monroe, Virginia, a national monument, in recognition of his book's role in informing that decision.

  • Picturing War: The Civil War and America’s Visual Culture
  • The Fire Zouaves and the Death of Ellsworth: A Story of Acrobatics, Bloodshed, and the First Days of the Civil War
  • How Slavery Really Ended in America: Three Black Virginians Who Crossed a River and Changed History
  • Lincoln's Last Journey in 1865 and His Legacy in 2015

Lesley J. Gordon

University of Akron

Lesley J. Gordon is a professor of history at the University of Akron where she teaches courses in the Civil War and Reconstruction, U.S. military history, and the Early Republic. Gordon is the author of General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend (1998) and A Broken Regiment: The 16th Connecticut's Civil War (2014); a coeditor of Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and their Wives (2001) and Inside the Confederate Nation: Essays in Honor of Emory M. Thomas (2005); and a coauthor of This Terrible War: The Civil War and its Aftermath (2003).

  • "A Broken Regiment": The 16th Connecticut's Civil War
  • Cowardice and the American Civil War
  • George E. Pickett in Life and Legend
  • Intimate Strategies: Civil War Military Commanders and Their Wives

Linda Gordon

New York University

Linda Gordon is the Florence Kelley Professor of History and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. Her books include The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America (2002); Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare (1994), winner of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize; The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction (1999), winner of the Bancroft Prize; and Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits (2009), which also won the Bancroft Prize, making Gordon one of three people ever to win this prize twice. She also discovered Dorothea Lange's photographs of the Japanese-American internment during World War II—photographs which had been suppressed by the U.S. Army because they were so critical— and published them for the first time in Impounded: Dorothea Lange and the Censored Images of Japanese American Internment (2006).

  • Birth Control and Abortion: A Long Historical View
  • Dorothea Lange: The Conflicts of an Ambitious Woman
  • Impounded: Dorothea Lange's Hidden Photographs of the Japanese Internment in World War II
  • The Campaign Against Violence Against Women
  • The Much Misunderstood Women's Liberation Movement
  • Visual Democracy: How Dorothea Lange Used Photography to Promote Equality
  • What's Wrong with "Putting Children First?"
  • What's Wrong with "The Best Interests of the Child?"

Sarah Barringer Gordon

University of Pennsylvania

The Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, Sarah Barringer Gordon teaches and writes on American religious and constitutional history. She is the author of The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (2002) and The Spirit of the Law: Religious Voices and the Constitution in Modern America (2010). She is currently at work on a book entitled "Freedom's Holy Light: Disestablishment in America, 1776-1876." She is particularly interested in the legal history of religion and religious peoples in America, with a special focus on the relationship of politics and law to belief and practice in American life. In the most religiously diverse country on earth, freedom of religion has been central, and controversial, across American history.

  • Prayer and the Constitution: The Cold War, Football, and the Tangled Law of Religion
  • The African Supplement: Religion, Race, and Corporate Law in Early National America
  • Blasphemy: The Prosecution of Religious and Sexual Dissent in the Nineteenth Century
  • Holy War: The Campaign against Secularism in Public Education, 1979–1990
  • Polygamy at the Supreme Court: Reynolds v. United States in Legal History

Elliott J. Gorn

Loyola University, Chicago

Elliott J. Gorn holds the Joseph A. Gagliano Chair in History at Loyola University, Chicago, where he teaches courses in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American history. Gorn has received awards from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His most recent books are Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America (2001) and Dillinger's Wild Ride: The Year that Made America's Public Enemy Number One (2009).

  • John Dillinger and Depression-Era America
  • Searching for Mother Jones
  • The Ghost of Emmett Till

New in 2013 2014Andrew R. Graybill *

Southern Methodist University

Andrew R. Graybill is a professor of history and the director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University, where he has taught since 2011. He previously taught at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Graybill is a historian of the North American West, with particular interest in expansion, borders, race, violence, and the environment. His first book, Policing the Great Plains: Rangers, Mounties, and the North American Frontier, 1875-1910 (2007), is a comparative study of the two most famous constabularies in the world, focusing especially on the consequences of frontier absorption for rural peoples. With Benjamin H. Johnson, he coedited Bridging National Borders in North America: Transnational and Comparative Histories (2010), which brings scholars of the continent's two border regions into sustained conversation with each other. His second book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (2013), tells the story of a Montana family of mixed native-white ancestry and the changing notions of racial identity in the West between 1850 and 1950. With Adam I. Arenson, he is currently completing an edited volume on the Civil War and Reconstruction in the American West.

  • The Red and the White: The Saga of a Mixed-Race Family in Montana, 1850–1950
  • Mild West and Wild West: Canadian and American Frontiers in Comparative Perspective
  • Boundless Nature: Borders and the Environment in North America (and Beyond)

New in 2013 2014Adam Green *

University of Chicago

Adam Green is an associate professor of American history at the University of Chicago, where he also serves as master of the social sciences collegiate division and deputy dean of social sciences. His research interests include modern U.S. history, African American history, urban history, comparative racial politics, and cultural economy. He is the author of Selling the Race: Culture and Community in Black Chicago, 1940-1955 (2007) and a coeditor of Time Longer than Rope: Studies in African American Activism, 1850-1950 (2003).


James Green

University of Massachusetts Boston

James Green is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he directs the graduate program in public history. He is author of Taking History to Heart: The Power of the Past in Building Social Movements (2000) and Death in the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement, and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America (2006). He has served as president of the Labor and Working Class History Association, as a lecturer in the Harvard Trade Union Program, and as research director for the pbs series “The Great Depression.” He is currently writing a book about the West Virginia coal mine wars.

  • Marking Workers' Lives on the National Landscape: Labor History Meets Public History
  • The Haymarket Tragedy: A Drama Without End
  • The West Virginia Mine Wars and the Meaning of Freedom in Industrial America

Laurie Green

University of Texas at Austin

Laurie Green is an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is also affiliated with the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, the African and African diaspora studies department, and the American studies department. She teaches courses on civil rights history from a comparative perspective, women's history, social and cultural history, and the history of gender, race, and national identity in twentieth-century America. Her first book, Battling the Plantation Mentality: Memphis and the Black Freedom Struggle (2007), won the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award and was a finalist for the OAH Liberty Legacy Foundation Award. Her current book project is entitled "The Discovery of Hunger in America: The Politics of Race, Poverty, and Malnutrition after the Fall of Jim Crow."

  • Civil Rights or the War Against Poverty? The Politics of History
  • Starvation Politics: Hunger, Race, and Activism in 1960s–1970s America
  • The Civil Rights Movement Reconsidered: A Battle against the "Plantation Mentality"
  • "I AM a Man!": Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Memphis Sanitation Strike
  • The Power of the Mass Media: Reconsidering Civil Rights and Antipoverty Movements after World War II

Michael S. Green

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

An associate professor of history at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Michael S. Green specializes in nineteenth-century politics and the American West. His works on the Civil War era include Freedom, Union, and Power: Lincoln and His Party during the Civil War (2004); Politics and America in Crisis: The Coming of the Civil War (2010); and Lincoln and the Election of 1860 (2011). His books on Nevada include Las Vegas: A Centennial History (2005), with Eugene Moehring, and the forthcoming "Nevada: A History of the Silver State." A recipient of the American Historical Association's Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award, he is also on the board of directors of the National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement.

  • From Atomic Cocktails to Witch Hunts: Nevada's Forgotten Role in the Cold War
  • Lincoln and Leadership: Lessons and Legends
  • Lincoln and the Far West
  • Mavericks, Mobsters, mbas, and Museums: Gaming and Organized Crime in Las Vegas
  • The Mississippi of the West: Civil Rights in Las Vegas
  • The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln

New in 2013 2014Amy S. Greenberg *

Penn State University

Amy S. Greenberg is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women's Studies at Penn State University, where she has taught since 1995. She is the author of Cause for Alarm: The Volunteer Fire Department in the Nineteenth-Century City (1998), Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire (2005), Manifest Destiny and American Territorial Expansion: A Brief History with Documents (2012) and A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico (2012), which received awards from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic and the Western History Association, and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Greenberg has received major fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, and American Philosophical Society, among others. She has won her university's George Atherton Award for Teaching and has been named a top young historian by History News Network. She is currently at work on two book projects: a biography of Sarah Childress Polk and an analysis of the role of dissent in nineteenth-century U.S. imperialism.

  • Abraham Lincoln and the U.S.-Mexican War: How a Freshman Congressman Gained National Attention by Opposing an Unjust War
  • Daughter of the U.S.-Mexican War: The Origins of the Daughters of the American Revolution in the 1848 Invasion of Mexico
  • The Rise and Fall of the Urban Volunteer Fire Company: Why Nineteenth-Century Citizens Chose to Pay for an Urban Service They Had Previously Received for Free
  • A Wicked War: The 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico and America's First National Antiwar Movement
  • Sarah Childress Polk and the Origins of American Female Political Conservativism
  • Who's Afraid of a Little Empire? Anti-Imperialism in Nineteenth-Century America

Cheryl Greenberg

Trinity College

Cheryl Greenberg is the Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of History at Trinity College where she teaches African American history, race and ethnicity, and twentieth-century U.S. history. She has written extensively on these topics including several books: “Or Does It Explode?”: Black Harlem in the Great Depression (1991); Troubling the Waters: Black-Jewish Relations in the American Century (2006); and To Ask for an Equal Chance (2009), a text with documents on African Americans during the Great Depression. She also edited A Circle of Trust: Remembering SNCC (1998). She is currently working on a project about African Americans and gay marriage; editing the memoir and oral history of a civil rights organizer in Marks, Mississippi; and writing a book on the history of civil rights organizations' attitudes toward hate speech.

  • A History of Black-Jewish Relations and Why It Matters
  • Civil Rights Responses to Japanese Internment
  • Civil Rights vs. Civil Liberties: The Debates over Hate Speech and “Group Libel” Laws
  • Liberal NIMBY: American Jews and Civil Rights in the North
  • Southern Jews and the Civil Rights Movement
  • Are We Post-Racial Yet? Race, Culture, and Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Obama

Kenneth S. Greenberg

Suffolk University

Kenneth S. Greenberg is the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and a Distinguished Professor of History at Suffolk University. He is the author of a number of books about American slavery including Honor and Slavery: Lies, Duels, Noses, Masks, Dressing as a Woman, Gifts, Strangers, Humanitarianism, Death, Slave Rebellions, the Proslavery Argument, Baseball, Hunting, and Gambling in the Old South (1996); Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory (2003); The Confessions of Nat Turner (1996); and Masters and Statesmen: The Political Culture of American Slavery (1985). He is also a coproducer and a cowriter of the film, Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property, nationally screened on pbs.

  • History and Film
  • Honor and Slavery
  • The Nat Turner Slave Rebellion

James N. Gregory

University of Washington

James N. Gregory is a professor of history and the Harry Bridges Endowed Chair of Labor Studies, emeritus, at the University of Washington. His work focuses on labor, civil rights, radicalism, migration, and also public history. He directs the Pacific Northwest Civil Rights and Labor History Projects, a set of online multimedia public history resources. His most recent book, The Southern Diaspora: How the Great Migrations of Black and White Southerners Transformed America (2005), won the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award. His American Exodus: The Dust Bowl Migration and Okie Culture in California (1989) also won two major book prizes. He is currently writing a book about the history of radicalism on the West Coast.

  • Radical Generations: The Making and Maintenance of Left Coast Political Traditions
  • Southernizing America: Migration, Culture, and Political Change in the Twentieth Century
  • Teaching a City Its Civil Rights History: How to Develop a Digital Public History Project that Connects the Campus to the Community
  • The Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project: How a Public History Project Changed the Law, Changed School Curricula, and More
  • The Southern Diaspora: How the Great Migrations of Black and White Southerners Reshaped Race, Religion, and Regions

Mark Grimsley

Ohio State University

Mark Grimsley is an associate professor at Ohio State University, where he teaches military history and nineteenth-century American history. His books include And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864 (2002) and The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy Toward Southern Civilians, 1861-1865 (1995). He is currently researching 1864 as a pivotal moment in American history, Reconstruction violence, and the interplay between nonviolence and Black self-defense in the civil rights struggle. He has won three teaching awards, including the Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award, his university’s highest award for excellence in the classroom.

  • "A Near Run Thing": An Introduction to Counterfactual History
  • Starship Troopers, Civic Virtue, and the American Civil War
  • Civil War Soldiers
  • How to Read a Civil War Battlefield
  • Why the Civil Rights Movement Was an Insurgency

Ariela J. Gross

University of Southern California

Ariela J. Gross is the John B. and Alice R. Sharp Professor of Law and History, and a codirector of the Center for Law, History, and Culture, at the University of Southern California. She has published articles on the law and politics of race and the memory of slavery in the United States and France, and on race, law, and comparative history. She is also the author of What Blood Won’t Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America (2008)—which was named a Choice outstanding academic title, cowinner of the James Willard Hurst Prize, and winner of the Lillian Smith Award and the American Political Science Association’s Best Book on Race, Ethnicity, and Politics—and Double Character: Slavery and Mastery in the Antebellum Southern Courtroom (2000). She is currently working on a study of race, law, and conservatism in post–World War II America, as well as a comparative project on law, race, and slavery in the Americas with Cuban historian Alejandro de la Fuente.

  • Comparative Race and Slavery in the Americas
  • Law, Politics, and the Memory of Slavery in the United States and Europe
  • Race and Modern Conservative Movement
  • Slavery and the Law in the United States
  • Slavery, Anti-Slavery, and the Coming of the Civil War
  • Slavery, Reconstruction, and the Constitution
  • The History of Race and Racism in the United States

New in 2013 2014Allen C. Guelzo *

Gettysburg College

Allen C. Guelzo is the Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and the director of Civil War era studies at Gettysburg College. He is the author of Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (1999) and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (2004), both of which won the Lincoln Prize, as well as Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America (2008); a volume of essays, Abraham Lincoln as a Man of Ideas (2009); and Lincoln: A Very Short Introduction (2009). Most recently, he is the author of Fateful Lightning: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (2012) and Gettysburg: The Last Invasion (2013), which won a third Lincoln Prize and the inaugural Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History. With Patrick Allitt and Gary W. Gallagher, he team-taught The Teaching Company’s new edition of its American history series; his courses on Abraham Lincoln, American intellectual history, the American Revolution, and great history writers are also available on dvd.

  • A. Lincoln, Philosopher: Lincoln as a Man of Ideas
  • Does Lincoln Still Belong to the Ages?
  • Four Roads to Emancipation: Lincoln, the Law, and the Proclamation
  • Under the Constitution and above the Constitution: Abraham Lincoln’s Struggle to Develop a Doctrine of the “War Powers” of the Presidency
  • Was the Civil War a Second American Revolution?

Gayle Gullett

Arizona State University

Gayle Gullett is an associate professor of history in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. She specializes in American women's history, the American West, and urban history. Her publications include Becoming Citizens: The Emergence and Development of the California Women's Movement, 1880-1911 (2000). With Susan E. Gray, she is a former coeditor of Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies; together, they are currently finishing "Contingent Maps: Rethinking Western Women's History", an anthology of recently published Frontiers articles about gender and the West. Gullett is also working on a book manuscript, "New Women in a New City: Gender, Modernity, and Los Angeles, 1910-1920."

  • Building a Woman's Movement and Becoming Citizens: A California Story, 1880-1920
  • How the Vote Was Won in California, 1911
  • Modernity and the City: Newspaper Women, the Press, and 1910s Los Angeles
  • Winning the Vote in the American West: The Western Woman Suffrage Movement

Ramón Gutiérrez

University of Chicago

Ramón Gutiérrez is the Preston and Sterling Morton Distinguished Service Professor of History and the director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago. A former MacArthur Fellow, he previously taught at the University of California, San Diego, where he founded the ethnic studies department and its Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. The author of When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away (1991), and the editor of six volumes, he is currently working on a study of the religious and political thought of Reyes López Tijerina, one of the leaders of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s.

  • Hispanic American History
  • Race and Sexuality in American History
  • Reies López Tijerina and the Religious Origins of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

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Lisbeth Haas

University of California, Santa Cruz

Lisbeth Haas is a professor of history and feminist studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she also chairs the feminist studies department. Her research and writing consider colonialism, imperialism, and their legacies, focusing on the multiethnic populations of California, integrating a concern for how people define their own histories and legal rights, and favoring the placement of U.S. history within the context of the Americas. Her early writing, which includes Conquests and Historical Identities in California, 1769–1936 (1995), incorporates Mexican-American, urban, and agricultural history. Her most recent book is Pablo Tac, Indigenous Scholar Writing on Luiseño Language and Colonial History (2011), a biography with Luiseño artist James Luna of a young scholar born at Mission San Luis Rey who wrote a grammar, dictionary, and history while studying in Rome in the late 1830s. The book includes Tac’s original manuscript in three languages as well as in English translation. Tac’s scholarship offers extensive information about colonial California and is a source for Haas’s forthcoming book, Saints and Citizens: Indigenous Histories of Colonial Missions and Mexican California (2013), which examines the colonial history of California, especially that of the Chumash, Luiseno, and Yokuts as they reconfigured their societies after the Spanish invasion.

  • California and World History
  • California Missions (and other topics in California history)
  • Historical Memory, Sites of Memory, and Monuments
  • Indigenous Histories and Subaltern Stories of the Colonial Americas, the Southwest, and the Borderlands
  • Mexican American History and Histories of Diaspora

New in 2013 2014Steven W. Hackel *

University of California, Riverside

A professor of history at the University of California, Riverside, Steven W. Hackel specializes in colonial America, the Spanish borderlands, California missions, and California Indians. A leading scholar of Spanish California, he is the author of Junípero Serra: California’s Founding Father (2013), a comprehensive biography drawing on extensive archival research in Spain, Mexico, and California, and the award-winning Children of Coyote, Missionaries of Saint Francis: Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769-1850 (2005), a sweeping examination of Spanish California centered on Indian life in Mission San Carlos which Serra established in Monterey in 1770. Hackel is also the author of numerous articles on Spanish California and the editor of a volume of essays on colonial California, Alta California: People in Motion, Identities in Formation (2010). He is the general editor of the Huntington Library’s Early California Population Project, a database of the baptism, marriage, and burial records from all of California’s twenty-one missions, and the director of the Early California Cultural Atlas, a spatial history of colonial California funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Born and raised in California, Hackel is a member of the board of directors of the California Missions Foundation, the California Missions Studies Association, and the Historical Society of Southern California.

  • The Rock and the Crucifix: 200 Years of Remembering Junipero Serra

New in 2013 2014Cindy Hahamovitch *

College of William and Mary

Cindy Hahamovitch is the Class of ’38 Professor of History at the College of William and Mary, where she teaches U.S., labor, and immigration history. She is the author of The Fruits of Their Labor: Atlantic Coast Farmworkers and the Making of Migrant Poverty, 1870-1945 (1997) and the triple-prizewinning No Man's Land: Jamaican Guestworkers in America and the Global History of Deportable Labor (2013). Her work focuses on human trafficking in labor around the globe, migrant farmworkers in the United States, and the rising use of deportable labor in the United States and abroad. She has lectured in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, and Scotland, and at a wide range of American universities. A Fulbright fellow, she has also held fellowships at the National Humanities Center and Yale University's Program in Agrarian Studies. She is a past president of the Southern Labor Studies Association and the current reviews editor for Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas.

  • Caribbean Guestworkers, Florida's Sugar Industry, and the Last Attempt at Comprehensive Immigration Reform
  • No Man's Land: Jamaican Guestworkers, Deportable Labor, and the New Jim Crow
  • Shutting the Gates on an Open World: The Very Modern History of Immigration Restriction

Steven Hahn

University of Pennsylvania

Steven Hahn is the Roy F. and Jeanette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania and a specialist on the history of the American South and the comparative history of slavery and emancipation. He is the author of A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (2003), winner of the Bancroft Prize, the OAH Merle Curti Prize, and the Pulitzer Prize for history; and The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Upcountry, 1850-1890 (1983), winner of the Frederick Jackson Turner Award. He is a coeditor of The Countryside in the Age of Capitalist Transformation: Essays in the Social History of Rural America (1985) and the forthcoming “Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, Land, and Labor in 1865.”

  • Barack Obama, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Long History of African American Politics
  • Marcus Garvey, the UNIA, and the Hidden Political History of African Americans
  • Slave Emancipation, Indian Peoples, and the Projects of the New American State
  • What Did the Slaves Think of Lincoln?
  • Why the Civil War Mattered

Jacquelyn D. Hall

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jacquelyn Hall is the Julia Cherry Spruill Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the founding president of the Labor and Working Class History Association as well as a past president of the Southern Historical Association and the OAH. Recipient of a National Humanities Medal, she is the author of Revolt Against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching (1979) and a coauthor of Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (1987). She is currently completing a book entitled "Writing a Way Home."

  • Feminist Biography
  • Self and Subject in Historical Writing
  • Southern Women on the Left
  • Southern Workers
  • The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • The Uses of Oral History

Pekka Hämäläinen

Oxford University

Pekka Hämäläinen is the Rhodes Professor of American History at Oxford University and a fellow at St. Catherine’s College. He is the author of The Comanche Empire (2008), which won several awards, including the Bancroft Prize, the OAH Merle Curti Award, the Caughey Prize, the Norris and Carol Hundley Award, and a Recognition of Excellence Award from the Cundill Prize in History jury. He is also a coeditor, with Benjamin H. Johnson, of Major Problems in North American Borderlands History (2011).

  • The Comanche Empire and the Grand Narrative of North America
  • The Other American History: The Struggle for Power and Survival in North America, 1600-1900

William M. Hammond

University of Maryland, College Park

The retired chief of the General Histories Branch at the U.S. Army's Center of Military History and a Senior Lecturer Emeritus in University Honors at the University of Maryland, College Park, William Hammond is the author of the Army's groundbreaking two-volume history of its relations with the news media during the Vietnam conflict. He has also written Reporting Vietnam: Media and Military at War (1998), winner of the Leopold Prize, and is a coauthor of Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry in Korea (1996), a study of the Army's last segregated infantry regiment.

  • Black Soldier, White Army: The Korean War and Its Role in the Destruction of the Jim Crow Army
  • Who Were the Saigon Correspondents, and Does It Matter Today? Do Vietnam Precedents Still Apply to Military-Media Relations in Wartime?

Sharon Harley

University of Maryland, College Park

Associate professor and chair of the African American studies department at the University of Maryland, College Park, Sharon Harley researches, teaches, and speaks frequently on black women’s labor history and racial and gender politics. Editor of and contributor to noted anthologies about black women in the modern Civil Rights movement and women of color in the global economy, she is currently writing a book about gender, labor, and citizenship in the lives of African Americans from the 1860s to 1920s.

  • Black Women's Cultural Production and Racial Politics
  • Black Women, Labor, and Citizenship from the Postbellum Period to Early Twentieth Century
  • Gloria Richardson
  • Mary Church Terrell

New in 2013 2014Alexandra Harmon *

University of Washington

Alexandra Harmon began her career advising and representing American Indian tribes in the state of Washington for sixteen years as an on-reservation attorney for the Skokomish and Suquamish tribes and as a coordinator of the Evergreen Legal Services Native American Project. Wishing to explore and write about questions that arose in her legal work, she entered the graduate history program at the University of Washington; she has taught as part of the American Indian studies program there since 1995. Harmon is the author of Indians in the Making: Ethnic Relations and Indian Identities around Puget Sound (1998) and Rich Indians: Native People and the Problem of Wealth in American History (2010). She also edited The Power of Promises: Rethinking Indian Treaties in the Pacific Northwest (2008). A principal premise of her work is that Indians' history, while distinctive in significant ways, is integral to more aspects of American history than scholars have generally acknowledged. Her current research concerns the conditions and developments that prompted tribal governments in the 1970s to assert jurisdiction over all persons within their reservations, including non-Indians, thus raising the stakes in Indians' bid to renegotiate the terms of their relationship with the United States.

  • Rich Indians and the Dilemmas They Have Presented
  • The Non-Indian Problem and the Revitalization of Tribal Sovereignty
  • Indian Treaties, from Bad Bargains to Sacred Promises

Claudrena N. Harold

University of Virginia

An assistant professor of history and African American studies at the University of Virginia, Claudrena N. Harold specializes in African American history, black cultural politics, and labor history. She is the author of The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South (2007), which chronicles the history of Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association from the perspective of black women and men living below the Mason-Dixon Line. Her forthcoming “No Ordinary Sacrifice: New Negro Politics in the Jim Crow South” details how the development of New Negro politics and thought was shaped by people, ideas, organizations, and movements rooted in the South, bringing into full view the ways southern blacks not only validated the idea of the New Negro as a national phenomenon but also significantly informed and reshaped the contours of black nationality and class formation. She is currently coediting The Problem of Punishment: Race, Inequality, and Justice and continues her exploration into the history and politics of African American music.

  • African American Music and the Black Liberation Struggle
  • African American Social Movements
  • African American Workers and their Historic Quest for a Living Wage
  • Black Nationalism and the Black Power Movement
  • Democratic Limits and Potentials of Social Media
  • The Democratic Potential of Public History in a Multiracial Society

Leslie Harris

Emory University

Leslie M. Harris is an associate professor of history and African American studies at Emory University. She is the author of In the Shadow of Slavery: African Americans in New York City, 1626-1863 (2003) and a coeditor, with Ira Berlin, of Slavery in New York (2005) and, with Daina Ramey Berry, of Slavery and Freedom in Savannah (2014). She is currently at work on a family history of New Orleans between 1965 (Hurricane Betsy) and 2005 (Hurricane Katrina). She is also a cofounder and director of the Transforming Community Project of Emory University, which seeks to engage all members of the university community in the active recovery of and reflection on the history of race at Emory and its meaning for the institution today.

  • African Americans, Class, and Community in Pre-Civil War New York City
  • On the Eve of Katrina: Life in Late-Twentieth-Century New Orleans
  • Slavery and Freedom in Savannah
  • Slavery in New York City
  • Transforming Community at Emory University: An Institution Confronts its Racial History

Ellen Hartigan-O'Connor

University of California, Davis

Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Davis, where she teaches courses on the social, cultural, economic, and gender history of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America. She is the author of The Ties That Buy: Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America (2009), which considers black and white women as workers, shoppers, and creditors. She is currently writing a book on auctions and market culture in America.

  • America under the Hammer: Auctions and Market Culture
  • Gender, Justice, and the American Revolution
  • The Politics of Shopping in Early America
  • Work, Family, and the Development of American Capitalism

Susan M. Hartmann

Ohio State University

Susan M. Hartmann is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor of History Emerita at Ohio State University and has published extensively on women in the twentieth century, feminism, and women's rights movements. Among her books are The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s (1983); From Margin to Mainstream: American Women and Politics since the 1960s (1989); a textbook, The American Promise (4th edition, 2008); and The Other Feminists (1998), a study of women's rights activism in the 1960s and 1970s. She has been a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson International Center of Scholars and has been elected a fellow of the Society of American Historians.

  • Gender and Politics in Post-World War II America
  • Material Interests and Economic Realities in the Wars over Feminism in the U.S. in the 1970s
  • The 1950s: Feminine Mystique or Feminist Movement?
  • What American Women Had to Do to Win the Vote

Paul Harvey

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

Paul Harvey is a professor of history and a Presidential Teaching Scholar at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. His research interests focus on American religious history, the history of the American South, African American history, and American cultural history. He is the author of several books on American religious history, including most recently The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America (2012), cowritten with Edward J. Blum. He is also the creator of the blog Religion in American History.

  • Moses, Jesus, and the Trickster in the Evangelical South
  • Religion and the American Civil War
  • Religion, Race, and American Ideas of Freedom
  • Southern Religion and Civil Rights
  • The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America

Donald Teruo Hata

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Donald T. Hata is an emeritus professor of history at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is the author of "Undesirables": Early Immigrants and the Anti-Japanese Movement in San Francisco, 1892-1893 (1978) and numerous articles; he is also a coauthor, with Nadine Hata, of Japanese Americans and World War II: Mass Removal, Imprisonment, and Redress (4th edition, 2011). His research is influenced by personal experiences that include three years (1942-45) as a child prisoner in the U.S. War Relocation Authority (WRA) concentration camp at Gila River, Arizona, and five years (1971-76) as a planning commissioner and city councilman in Gardena, California, which at the time was the largest community of Japanese Americans on the U.S. mainland. He is a consultant to the National Park Service at the Tule Lake Unit—the national historic site that was arguably the worst of the WRA's vast gulag of concentration camps for Japanese Americans (Nikkei). A recipient of the California State University Trustees' system-wide outstanding professor award, he shared the California Historical Society's award of merit with Nadine Hata for "their pioneering efforts to clarify the historic role of Japanese Americans in California through writing, teaching, and public service."

  • Unfinished Business: Key Issues in Nikkei (Japanese American) History during and after World War II
  • Remembering the Nikkei Gulag and Diaspora Experience in World War II
  • Can the Nikkei Wartime Experience Happen Again? Civil Liberties after December 7, 1941, and September 11, 2001
  • A Nikkei in Tokyo: My Year as a Resident Tutor to Actor Toshiro Mifune

Christine Leigh Heyrman

University of Delaware

Christine Leigh Heyrman is the Grimble Professor of American History at the University of Delaware. Her books include Commerce and Culture: The Maritime Communities of Colonial Massachusetts, 1690-1750 (1984) and Southern Cross: The Beginnings of the Bible Belt (1998), which won the Bancroft Prize. She is also a coauthor of the textbook, Nation of Nations: A Narrative History of the American Republic (6th edition, 2007). Her current research focuses on focuses on the first cohort of American Protestant missionaries in the Middle East (1820-1860).

  • Encounters with Islam: The First American Protestant Missionaries in the Middle East
  • First Encounters with the Indians: European Representations of Native Americans in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (with slides)
  • Holy Wars in Beulah Land: The Contest Among Evangelical Christians in the American South, 1770-1860

Joan Hoff

Montana State University, Bozeman

An occasional commentator on the presidency for the “Newshour with Jim Lehrer,” Hoff is currently a research professor of history at Montana State University. She is a former president of the Center for the Study of the Presidency, a former executive director of OAH, and a former director of the Contemporary History Institute at Ohio University. She is also the author, most recently, of A Faustian Foreign Policy from Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush (2007), The Cooper’s Wife is Missing: The Trials of Bridget Cleary (2000), Nixon Reconsidered (1994), and Law, Gender, and Injustice: A Legal History of U.S. Women (2nd edition, 1994).

  • Modern Presidency
  • The Nixon Presidency
  • U.S. Twentieth-Century Diplomatic and Political History
  • U.S. Women's Legal Status
  • Jeannette Rankin: Her Visible and Invisible Legacy

Kristin Hoganson

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Kristin Hoganson is a professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She specializes in the history of the United States in world context, cultures of U.S. imperialism, and transnational history. She is the author of Fighting for American Manhood: How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars (1998) and Consumers' Imperium: The Global Production of American Domesticity, 1865-1920 (2007). Her current research on the U.S. heartland explores the politics of locality as they unfolded globally. She is particularly concerned with the relations between security and empire.

  • Isolationism as an Urban Legend
  • Unpacking Pork: Trans-imperial Histories of Anglo-Saxonist Pigs
  • Inventing the Local: The Politics of Place and Space in the Era of Removal
  • The American Empire around 1898
  • Importing the American Dream
  • Converging Borderlands in the U.S. Midwest
  • Popular Geographies of Food and Cooking

Jonathan Scott Holloway

Yale University

Jonathan Holloway is a professor of African American studies, history, and American studies at Yale University and the dean of Yale College. He specializes in postemancipation social and intellectual history. He is the author of Confronting the Veil: Abram Harris Jr., E. Franklin Frazier, and Ralph Bunche, 1919-1941 (2002); the editor of Ralph Bunche’s A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership (2005); and the coeditor of Black Scholars on the Line: Race, Social Science, and American Thought in the Twentieth Century (2007). In Jim Crow Wisdom: Memory, Identity, and Politics in Black America since 1940 (2013), Holloway uses popular literature, memoir, documentary film, and heritage tourism to ask critical questions of the historian’s craft.

  • Memory and History in Post-1941 Black America
  • Race, Social Science, and Citizenship in the Twentieth Century
  • Reinterpreting Black Leadership in a Post-Racial Age

Michael K. Honey

University of Washington, Tacoma

Michael K. Honey is the Fred and Dorothy Haley Professor of Humanities at the University of Washington, Tacoma. He teaches ethnic, gender, and labor studies, and African American and U.S. history, and specializes in work on Martin Luther King Jr. He is the author of several award-winning monographs on labor and civil rights history, including Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, King’s Last Campaign (2007) and Sharecropper's Troubador: John L. Handcox, the Southern Tenant Farmers' Union, and the African American Song Tradition (2013). He is also the editor of “All Labor Has Dignity” (2011), a collection of King speeches supporting labor rights and economic justice. A former southern civil rights organizer, he has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, and the Stanford Humanities Center.

  • Black Workers Remember: An Oral History of Segregation and the Freedom Struggle
  • Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King Jr.'s Last Campaign
  • Hard-Hitting Songs for Hard-Hit People: Music as a Form of Oral History
  • Martin Luther King Jr.'s Unfinished Agenda
  • Sharecropper's Troubadour: John Handcox, the Southern Tenant Farmers Union, and the African American Tradition

James Horn

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

James Horn is vice president of research and historical interpretation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He is the author of numerous books and articles on colonial America, most recently A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke (2010) and A Land As God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America (2005). He is currently working on two books: "1619: The Origins of Modern American Society" and "War Chief: The Remarkable Life and Times of the Great Indian Warrior Opechancanough."

  • 1619 and the Origins of Modern American Society
  • New Findings on Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony of Roanoke

Daniel Walker Howe

University of California, Los Angeles

Dan Howe grew up in Denver and now lives in Los Angeles. He learned to love history when he was about 6 years old; his father put him on his lap and told him about Hannibal crossing the Alps with elephants to fight the Romans. He has taught at Yale, UCLA, and Oxford. He won the Pulitzer Prize for What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (2007) and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also author of Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln (1997), and he intends his next book to be about the U.S.-Mexican War.

  • "Honest Abe": Abraham Lincoln and the Moral Character
  • "What Hath God Wrought": The Communications Revolution and its Consequences, 1815-1848 (illustrated)
  • Abraham Lincoln as a Self-Made Man
  • Manifest Destiny and the War with Mexico (illustrated)
  • The Improvement of America and the Improvement of Americans, 1815-1848 (illustrated)

Frederick E. Hoxie

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Fred Hoxie is the Swanlund Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he is also affiliated with the College of Law and the American Indian studies program. An elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has served as a consultant both to Indian tribes and government agencies, and his current research focuses on American Indian and indigenous political activism in the United States and beyond. His publications include A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians (1984); Parading Through History: The Making of the Crow Nation in America, 1805-1935 (1995); Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era (2001); The People: A History of Native America (2007), with David Edmunds and Neal Salisbury; Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country (2007), with Jay Nelson; and This Indian Country: American Indian Political Activists and the Place They Made (2012), which won the Western History Association's Caughey Prize.

  • Federal Indian Law: A Tool for Colonial Rule or Liberation?
  • Images of Native Americans in U.S. Historical Writing and Teaching
  • Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country
  • Word Warriors: American Indian Political Activists and the United States

Madeline Y. Hsu

University of Texas at Austin

Born in Missouri, Madeline Y. Hsu grew up traveling between Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Arkansas. She is currently an associate professor of history and director of the Center for Asian American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. The author of Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (2000), she also coedited, with Sucheng Chan, Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture (2008), and edited Chinese American Transnational Politics (2010), which features articles by the pioneering Chinese American historian Him Mark Lai. Her ongoing research projects explore ethnic food and entrepreneurship, the entwining of U.S. foreign relations with immigration law and racial ideologies, contemporary Taiwanese history, Cold War refugee migrations and brain drains, and the emergence of the model minority.

  • The Good Immigrants: How the Yellow Peril Became the Model Minority
  • Immigration Law, International Education, and the International Competition for Knowledge Workers
  • The Chinese Origins of America's Illegal Immigration Problem
  • The Origins of Chop Suey: Ethnic Representation and Entrepreneurship
  • Families Across Borders: Illegality and the Ties that Bind

Evelyn Hu-Dehart

Brown University

Evelyn Hu-DeHart began as a Latin Americanist, with two books on the Yaqui Indians of northwest Mexico and the borderlands. For more than two decades, she has explored Asian diasporas in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular attention to the Chinese of Mexico, Peru, and Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean. She has adopted not only transnational and transborder approaches in constructing the histories of these movements but also has worked and published multilingually, in English, Spanish, and Chinese, on several continents. As the director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University, she has taken a leading role in moving ethnic studies in more relational, comparative, hemispheric American and transpacific directions. She currently teaches a first-year bilingual (English-Spanish) seminar on the U.S.-Mexican border as well as a graduate seminar on diaspora and transnationalism.

  • Asians in the Americas: The Chinese, Japanese, and South Asian Diasporas
  • Spanish Manila and the First American Chinatown
  • The Strange and Curious History of the "Illegal Alien"

New in 2013 2014Jane H. Hunter *

Lewis and Clark College

Jane H. Hunter has taught for the past twenty years at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, where she has also served as associate dean and interim dean. A modern social and cultural historian of the United States, she has taught courses in the history of race and ethnicity, consumerism and the culture of personality, women’s history, and the American war in Vietnam. Her first book, Gospel of Gentility: American Women Missionaries in Turn-of-the-Century China (1984), won the Yale University Press Governors’ Award, and her second, How Young Ladies Became Girls: The Victorian Origins of American Girlhood (2002) won the History of Education Society's Outstanding Book Prize. A former Radcliffe research scholar and an Eccles fellow at the University of Utah Humanities Center, she has also received support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. During 2012-2013, she was a Fulbright distinguished chair, teaching in the world history department of Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, and speaking widely at other universities throughout China. She is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled, "Peace Corps/Philippines: Gender and Public Relations on the New Frontier."

  • What Were American Missionary Women Doing in China? Thoughts about the Missionary Movement in China a Century Ago and Today
  • Peace Corps/Philippines: Gender and Public Relations on the New Frontier
  • High Schools, New Girls, and New Women: 1880–1900
  • The Creation of an Imperial Heroine: Sacagawea, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and the Uses of History

Tera Hunter

Princeton University

Tera Hunter is a professor of history and African American studies at Princeton University. She has taught courses throughout her career on African American, southern, labor, and women’s history. She is the author of To ’Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War (1997), which received several prizes, including the Southern Historical Association’s H. L. Mitchell Award. She is a coeditor of Dialogues of Dispersal: Gender, Sexuality, and African Diasporas (2004) and African American Urban Studies: Perspectives from the Colonial Period to the Present (2004). She is currently writing a book on African American marriages in the nineteenth century.

  • African American Marriage in the Nineteenth Century

Heather A. Huyck

National Collaborative for Women's History Sites

Heather A. Huyck's thirty-year career as a public historian bridges academically based history and place-based history, especially history as found in the National Park Service system (she has visited 320 of the 402 national parks). For many years she taught at the College of William and Mary. Now the president of the National Collaborative for Women's History Sites (NCWHS), Huyck focuses on researching, preserving, and interpreting women's history. The former director of the Jamestown 400th Project, she is also the recipient of the American Historical Association's Herbert Feis Award for distinguished contributions in public history; the editor of Women's History: Sites and Resources (2008); and a coeditor, with Peg Strobel, of Revealing Women's History: Best Practices for Historic Sites (2011). In addition to working on various NCWHS projects, she is currently researching and processing over 15,000 documents from Mrs. Maggie Lena Walker, an African American community organizer and entrepreneur (1864–1934) best known for founding a bank (1903), an insurance company, a newspaper, and an emporium.

  • Crowbars and Blue Books: Thirty Years of Bridging Academic and Public History
  • Mrs. Maggie Walker and Her Independent Order: African Americans Defy Jim Crow
  • National Parks: America's History
  • Places of Colonial History: Telling the Whole Story
  • Preserving and Presenting the Places of Women's History
  • Using Architecture, Photography, and Archives to Research Jim Crow

New in 2013 2014Anne F. Hyde *

Colorado College

Anne Hyde works on the history of the North American West, specializing in the nineteenth century, and is particularly interested in race and family history. After arriving at Colorado College in 1991, she has served as the chair of the race and ethnic studies program and as the director of the Partnership for Civic Engagement, the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies, and the Crown Faculty Development Center. She has published widely in the history of the American West, served on editorial boards for the Pacific Historical Review and the Western Historical Quarterly, and has been elected to the boards of the Western History Association and the American Historical Association. Her most recent books are An American Vision: Far Western Landscape and National Culture, 1820–1920 (1991), The West in the History of the Nation (2 vols., 2000), and Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860 (2011), winner of the Bancroft Prize and a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

  • Empires, Nations, and Families: A New Western History
  • Love and Blood: An Intimate History of the North American West

New in 2013 2014Louis Hyman *

Cornell University

Louis Hyman is an assistant professor in the labor relations, law, and history department at the ILR School of Cornell University. He teaches courses on the history of labor, business, consumption, and management. His research focuses on the history of American capitalism, particularly the intersection of the government and the market in everyday economic practice. A former Fulbright scholar and McKinsey consultant, he is the author of Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink (2011), which focuses on the history of the political economy of debt and was selected as a Choice Top 25 outstanding academic book, and Borrow: The American Way of Debt (2012), explains how American culture shaped finance and in turn how finance shaped culture. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wilson Quarterly, Bloomberg, CNBC, and other media outlets, as well as in essay collections. He teaches the EdX mooc, "American Capitalism: A History," and is the founding editor of the Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism book series. Currently he is working on a book entitled, "Short-Sighted: The Rise of Flexible Corporations and Temporary Work in Postwar America."

  • Entrepreneurs of the New Deal
  • Consumer Debt and American Inequality
  • How Did We Get in Debt?

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New in 2013 2014David Igler *

University of California, Irvine

David Igler is a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, where he has taught since 2003. His fields of interest include Pacific history, California and the American West, and the United States in the world. He is the author of The Great Ocean: Pacific Worlds from Captain Cook to the Gold Rush (2013), which examines the convergence of foreign and indigenous populations throughout the eastern Pacific, and Industrial Cowboys: Miller & Lux and the Transformation of the Far West, 1850-1920 (2001). He is a coeditor, with William Deverell, of A Companion to California History (2008) and, with Clark Davis, of The Human Tradition in California (2002). Igler has received fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Huntington Library. His writing has won awards from the Western History Association, Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association, and Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. He is currently the president of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association.

  • Beyond the Wild West: Violence and Death in the Pacific during the Age of Encounters
  • The Great Hunt: Environment and Extinction in the Early Modern Pacific Ocean
  • Contesting Empire: Individuals and Oceanic Space in the Pacific

John C. Inscoe

University of Georgia

John C. Inscoe has taught southern history at the University of Georgia for the past thirty years. A native of western North Carolina, much of his research and writing has focused on nineteenth-century southern Appalachia, specifically on the issues of slavery, race, and the Civil War. He is the author, most recently, of Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South (2008) and Writing the South through the Self: Explorations in Southern Autobiography (2011), which explores how students of history can understand issues of race, gender, poverty, education, family, and community through what black and white southerners have written about their own lives. He is the editor of the online New Georgia Encyclopedia as well as a collection of articles on the Civil War in Georgia that was published in print in 2011.

  • Civil War and Remembrance in the Appalachian South
  • Coming of Age and Coming to Terms with Poverty: Perspectives on the Poor in Southern Autobiography
  • Georgia's Civil War
  • Race and Racism in Southern Appalachia: Myths, Realities, and Ambiguities
  • The Emotional Impact of Jim Crow
  • Writing the South through the Self: Insights into Race and Region in Southern Autobiography

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New in 2013 2014David H. Jackson Jr. *

Florida A&M University

David H. Jackson Jr. is a professor of history and the chair of the Department of History, Political Science, Public Administration, Geography, and African American Studies at Florida A&M University, a position he has held for the last nine years. Jackson has published five scholarly books and numerous scholarly articles, book chapters, short essays, and book reviews, and he has spoken at more than one hundred professional conferences, universities, public schools, prisons, courts, churches and other venues throughout the United States. He is the author most recently of Booker T. Washington and the Struggle against White Supremacy: The Southern Educational Tours, 1908-1912 (2008). He has received numerous awards from his university, including multiple teaching and research awards and the Rattler Pride Award for Community Leadership; he was also named one of the university's "Outstanding Alumni of the Quasquicentennial." In 2014 he received the American Historical Association’s Equity Award in recognition of his achievements in training and mentoring minority historians, having sent more than thirty students to doctoral programs in the last decade.

  • Booker T. Washington's Struggle against White Supremacy
  • A Call to Consciousness, a Legacy to Remember: A Conversation with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
  • A Chief Lieutenant of the Tuskegee Machine: Charles Banks of Mississippi
  • Radical Preacher-Activist: Bishop Henry McNeal Turner of the A.M.E. Church
  • The Sacred Mission of the African Scholar

New in 2013 2014Margaret Jacobs *

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Margaret Jacobs is the Chancellor's Professor of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she directed the women's and gender studies program from 2006 until 2011. She teaches courses on the history of women and gender in the United States and in the American West as well as comparative seminars on women, gender, and empire. She has published over a dozen articles and two award-winning books, Engendered Encounters: Feminism and Pueblo Cultures, 1879-1934 (1999) and White Mother to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940 (2009), which won the Bancroft Prize. She will publish "A Generation Removed: The Fostering and Adoption of Indigenous Children in the Postwar World” in fall 2014. This new book examines why indigenous children came to be overrepresented in the child welfare systems of the United States, Australia, and Canada, and how indigenous women activists mobilized to confront this crisis.

  • Remembering the "Forgotten Child": The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and '70s
  • If Everyone Cared: Transnational Indigenous Women’s Activism and Indigenous Child Welfare, 1960–1980
  • Colonizing the Senses: New Sensory Regimes in Institutions for Indigenous Children, 1880–1900
  • A Battle for the Children: Comparing Indigenous Child Removal in the American West and Australia, 1880–1940
  • The Great White Mother: Maternalism and Settler Colonialism in the American West and Australia, 1880–1940

Matthew Frye Jacobson

Yale University

Matthew Frye Jacobson is William Robertson Coe Professor of American Studies and History at Yale University. He is the author of Roots Too: White Ethnic Revival in Post-Civil Rights America (2006), winner of the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award; What Have They Built You to Do? The Manchurian Candidate and Cold War America (2006), with Gaspar Gonzalez; Barbarian Virtues: The United States Encounters Foreign Peoples at Home and Abroad, 1876-1917 (2000); Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race (1998), winner of the John Hope Franklin and the Ralph Bunche Prizes; and Special Sorrows: The Diasporic Imagination of Irish, Polish, and Jewish Immigrants of the United States (1995). A past president of the American Studies Association, he is at work on a study of anti-racism in U.S. culture in the post-war years, "Odetta's Voice and Other Weapons: The Civil Rights Era as Cultural History"; a multi-media documentary, "At the Crossroads of Hope and Despair: America after the Crash"; and a documentary film on the desegregation of American baseball.

  • The Historian's Eye Documentary Project
  • Annexing the "Other": Immigration and Imperialism, 1876-1917
  • Race, Immigration, and U.S. Citizenship
  • The Civil Rights Era as Cultural History
  • The History of "Whiteness" in U.S. Political Culture
  • White Ethnic Revival in Post-Civil Rights America

Karl Jacoby

Columbia University

Karl Jacoby is a professor of history at Columbia University. His research considers how power relations within human society are reinforced, complicated, and, at times, effaced through interactions with the natural world, especially with regard to the history of U.S. expansion. His first book, Crimes against Nature: Poachers, Squatters, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation (2001), examines the ways in which the United States sought to exert new forms of control over nature through the conservation movement. His second book, Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History (2008), focuses on the ways the tremendous violence toward American Indians that accompanied the “frontier” has been remembered and forgotten in the intervening years. His current project analyzes race and slavery along the U.S.-Mexico border through the life story of a one-time slave who made many journeys across the race line and the border line.

  • "Wondering Horror": A History of Violence and the Violence of History
  • Crossing the Line: The Strange Career of Guillermo Eliseo
  • National Parks and Native Peoples
  • The History of the Frontier and the Frontier of History: Thinking Historically about the Camp Grant Massacre

Winston James

University of California, Irvine

Winston James is a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, and a widely published historian of the African diaspora. He is the author of the prizewinning Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia: Caribbean Radicalism in Early Twentieth-Century America (1998), A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay’s Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion (2000), and The Struggles of John Brown Russwurm: The Life and Writings of a Pan-Africanist Pioneer, 1799–1851 (2010), and a coeditor of Inside Babylon: The Caribbean Diaspora in Britain (1993). His current project is a two-volume political biography of Claude McKay.

  • Rethinking the "New Negro" Movement, 1917–1930
  • The Caribbean Diaspora and Black Internationalism
  • The Caribbean Diaspora in the United States
  • The Life and Work of Claude McKay
  • The Life and Work of John Brown Russwurm

Caroline E. Janney

Purdue University

Caroline E. Janney is a professor of history at Purdue University where she teaches courses on the Civil War, Civil War memory, and women's history. Before earning her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, she worked as an archivist and historian at Shenandoah National Park. Her first book, Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (2008), explores the role of white southern women as the creators and purveyors of Confederate tradition in the immediate post-Civil War South. Her Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation (2013), an examination of how the Civil War was remembered between 1865 and the 1930s, won the Jefferson Davis Award from the Museum of the Confederacy and was an honorable mention for the OAH Avery O. Craven Award. She is also the editor of John Richard Dennett's The South As It Is, 1865-66 (2013) and the author of essays about the Civil War and its aftermath that have appeared in the Journal of Southern History, Civil War History, the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, and the Journal of the Civil War Era as well as in the books Crucible of the Civil War: Virginia from Secession to Commemoration (2006), edited by Edward L. Ayers, Gary W. Gallagher, and Andrew J. Torget, and Virginia's Civil War (2005), edited by Peter Wallenstein and Bertram Wyatt-Brown. She also serves as a coeditor of the University of North Carolina Press's Civil War America series.

  • Calls for Vengeance: Violence in the Wake of Lincoln's Assassination
  • Civil War Veterans: Lessons on Reconciling in the Aftermath of War
  • Reconciling and Reuniting the Nation: How Americans Have Remembered the Civil War
  • Remembering Appomattox: From Reconciliation to Sectional Discord
  • Remembering Lee: Disputes among Virginia's Men and Women over the Lee Monument
  • The Slavery Question: How Ex-Confederates Thought about Their Peculiar Institution
  • Union and Slavery: How Union Veterans Remembered the Civil War
  • Women and the American Civil War
  • Women's Associations and Civil War Memory

Robert F. Jefferson Jr.

University of New Mexico

Robert F. Jefferson Jr. directs the Africana studies program at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Fighting for Hope: African American Troops of the 93rd Infantry Division in World War II and Postwar America (2008) and is currently writing “The Color of Disability: Vasco De Gama Hale and Twentieth-Century America.”

  • African American Military Poets and World War II
  • Black Disabled Ex-GIs and the Struggle for Civil Rights in the 1950s
  • Black World War II Veterans and the African Independence Movements of the 1950s
  • Blinded Black World War II Veterans and the Rehabilitation Politics of the 1940s
  • Cadre Trailblazers: The Integrated Officer Training Schools of World War II

John W. Jeffries

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

John W. Jeffries is dean emeritus of arts, humanities, and social sciences as well as a professor emeritus of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Recipient of several campus and system-wide teaching awards, he is the author of books and articles on the politics and policy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt era and on the World War II home front. He is the editor of the 1929–1945 volume of the Encyclopedia of American History (2003, revised edition 2010) and is currently working on a book about the 1940 election.

  • Elections in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Era
  • Great Depression and the New Deal
  • The Domestic Impact of World War II
  • Was World War II the "Good War"?

Michael P. Johnson

Johns Hopkins University

Michael P. Johnson has been teaching at Johns Hopkins University for twenty years, focusing on nineteenth-century U.S. history. He has published extensively on topics related to slavery, free African Americans, secession, and Abraham Lincoln. He is also a coauthor of the popular college textbook, The American Promise (6th edition, 2015) and the editor of a widely used two-volume collection of documents, Reading the American Past (5th edition, 2012). His writings have received several national awards; he has won university awards for undergraduate teaching; and he has directed or advised more than seventy completed doctoral dissertations.

  • Black Master: The Story of William Ellison
  • Reading American Slave Conspiracies
  • Rethinking Abraham Lincoln
  • Who was Denmark Vesey?

Jacqueline Jones

University of Texas at Austin

Jacqueline Jones is the Walter Prescott Webb Chair in History and the Ideas/Mastin Gentry White Professor of Southern History at the University of Texas at Austin. A former MacArthur Fellow and a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, she specializes in U. S. southern, African-American, labor, and women's history. She is the author of several books, including, most recently, A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America (2013), Saving Savannah: The City and the Civil War (2008), and Creek Walking: Growing Up in Delaware in the 1950s (2001). She has also coauthored a college textbook, Created Equal: A Social and Political History of the American People (4th edition, 2013). The twenty-fifth anniversary edition, revised and updated, of her Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work and the Family from Slavery to the Present was published in 2009. She served as vice president for the professional division of the American Historical Association from 2011 to 2014.

  • Topics vary

Martha S. Jones

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Martha S. Jones is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan where she teaches history, African American studies, and law. She is also a codirector of the University of Michigan Law School's Program in Race, Law, and History. Prior to joining the Michigan faculty she was a public interest litigator in New York City, where she advocated for the rights of people with disabilities. In 2013-2014, she is the William C. and Ida Friday Fellow at the National Humanities Center. A nineteenth-century U.S. historian with an interest in race and inequality, Jones explores the history of race and citizenship, slavery, and the rights of women. She is currently completing a study of race and citizenship in the antebellum United States, "Overturning Dred Scott: Race, Rights, and Citizenship in the Antebellum America." She was a guest editor of the Journal of the Civil War Era special issue, "Proclaiming Emancipation" (2013), which marked the 150th anniversary of President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. She is the author of All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture, 1830-1900 (2007), a study of African American debates about women's rights, and a coeditor of the forthcoming volume, "Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women." An active public intellectual, Jones has been a commentator for the Huffington Post and CNN.com, and has curated public exhibitions on the history of race and caricature in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world, including "Proclaiming Emancipation" (2012-2013), which examined interpretations of the Emancipation Proclamation through the holdings of the William L. Clements Library.

  • Beyond Dred Scott: New Perspectives on Race and Rights before the Civil War
  • Caricature and Visual Culture: How the United States, France, and Britain Invented Race
  • Dr. King's Strength to Love and the Ethics of Civil Rights
  • The Puzzle of Free Black Citizenship: Port City Encounters from Baltimore to Rio de Janeiro
  • The Social Construction of Race in U.S. Law and Culture
  • Thurgood Marshall's Baltimore: Race and Rights in the Local Courthouse

Peniel E. Joseph

Tufts University

Peniel E. Joseph is professor of history at Tufts University. He is author of Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America (2006) and editor of The Black Power Movement: Rethinking the Civil Rights and Black Power Era (2006). He is currently working on a number of books, including A World of Our Own: Black Intellectuals and the Pan-African Dream, Any Day Now: African American Historical Criticism, and Revolution in Babylon: Stokely Carmichael and America in the 1960s.

  • 1968: Through the Trial of Huey Percy Newton
  • Revolution in Babylon: Stokely Carmichael and America in the 1960s
  • The Black Panthers and American Democracy
  • Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America

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Jane Kamensky

Brown University

Jane Kamensky is the Mary Ann Lippitt Professor in American History at Brown University; during 2014-2015, she is Mary L. Cornille Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Wellesley College. Her major publications include The Exchange Artist: A Tale of High-Flying Speculation and America’s First Banking Collapse (2008), a finalist for the George Washington Prize; and Governing the Tongue: The Politics of Speech in Early New England (1997). She is also a coauthor of the novel Blindspot (2008), with Jill Lepore; a coeditor of The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution (2012); a coauthor of A People and a Nation (10th ed., 2014); and a cofounder of Common-place, a pioneering electronic journal of American history and literature. Her forthcoming book, "Copley: A Life in Color," considers early America's most prominent artist and the very nature of the American Revolution.

  • The American School: Life and Art in the Age of Revolution
  • West, Copley Stuart: The American Artist as Atlantic Artisan

Walter D. Kamphoefner

Texas A&M University

Walter D. Kamphoefner has taught at Texas A&M University since 1988 and has written widely on immigration and ethnicity, with articles in four languages and three authored or coedited books in German and English. Since publishing a pioneering transatlantic study, The Westfalians: From Germany to Missouri (1987), he has worked extensively with immigrant letters, and on bilingual education and the immigrant language transition. He is currently the vice president/president-elect of the Society for German American Studies. While his research focuses primarily on Germans, he also regularly teaches a course on multiethnic immigration, past and present.

  • Beyond Liberty Cabbage: The German-American Experience during World War I
  • Elvis and Other Germans: Some Observations and Modest Proposals on the Writing of Ethnic History
  • German Texans: Model Minority or Reluctant Americanizers?
  • What German Americans Fought For: Evidence from their Civil War Letters
  • What's New about the Newest Immigration? Two Centuries of Historical Perspective

Stephen Kantrowitz

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Stephen Kantrowitz is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has earned several teaching awards. His research focuses on the relationship between race and citizenship in the era of emancipation. He is the author of More Than Freedom: Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829–1889 (2012), which was a finalist for both the Lincoln Prize and the Frederick Douglass Prize. His first book, Ben Tillman and the Reconstruction of White Supremacy (2000), was a New York Times Notable Book and won several scholarly awards. He is also a coeditor, with Peter P. Hinks, of All Men Free and Brethren: Essays on the History of African American Freemasonry (2013).

  • Insurgent Cosmopolitans: African American Freemasons and Their Freedom Dreams
  • More Than Freedom: African American Citizenship in the Nineteenth-Century United States
  • Citizenship and "Civilization": Native American Confrontations with Reconstruction
  • How Ben Tillman Got His Pitchfork

New in 2013 2014Peter Karsten *

University of Pittsburgh

Peter Karsten is a professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh, with joint appointments in the sociology department and the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He is the author of Law, Soldiers, and Combat (1978); Heart versus Head: Judge-Made Law in Nineteenth-Century America (1997); the prizewinning Between Law and Custom: "High" and "Low" Legal Cultures in the Lands of the British Diaspora, 1600–1900 (2003); and The Magic Mirror: Law in American History (2nd edition, 2009), among other books. He is also editor-in-chief of the prizewinning Encyclopedia of War and American Society (3 volumes, 2005). He has held visiting chairs at University College Dublin, Augsburg Universitat, and The Citadel.

  • Understanding the World of Combat Infantrymen in Europe during World War II: Surveys, Recollections, and the Critical Role of War Correspondents, Photographers, and Cartoonists
  • The Four "Cousins-in-Law" and How They Are Related: Substantive Due Process and State-Based Prohibition; Slavery in the Federal Territory; Mormon Statehood; and Public School Prayer and Bible Reading
  • Critics or Agents of Imperialism? Celtic Interactions with Indigenous People and Slaves in the British Empire and the United States
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis, a Very Close Call
  • Crises of Conscience: Rethinking the Moral Dilemmas Faced by U.S. Jurists and Military Officers in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Myriad of Consequences of U.S. Wars

Stanley N. Katz

Princeton University

An expert on American legal history, the history of philanthropy, and the history of higher education, Stan Katz is the director of Princeton's Center for Arts and Cultural Policy and a lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is a past president of the OAH and the Society for Legal History, and the editor-in-chief of the Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History (2009). President emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, he received the National Humanities Medal in 2010, recognizing a career devoted to fostering public support for the humanities.

  • America's International Dilemma: Why Doesn't the U.S. Fully Participate in the International Human Rights System?
  • Constitutionalism and Human Rights: The Dilemma of the United States
  • Gun-Barrel Democracy? Democratic Constitutionalism Following Military Occupation: Reflections on the U.S. Experience in Japan, Germany, Afghanistan, and Iraq
  • John Dewey and the Civic Purposes of General Education
  • The "Just" University
  • Who's Afraid of Senator Byrd? Constitutionalism and American History

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui

Wesleyan University

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui is an associate professor of American studies and anthropology at Wesleyan University, where she teaches courses on colonialism, critical race studies, and indigenous sovereignty issues. The author of Hawaiian Blood: Colonialism and the Politics of Sovereignty and Indigeneity (2008), she is currently working on a second book, “Thy Kingdom Come? The Paradox of Hawaiian Sovereignty,” a critical study on land, gender, and sexual politics in relation to indigeneity and Hawaiian nationalism. Kauanui is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society, a council member of the American Studies Association, a former president of the New England American Studies Association, and a founding council member of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. She is also active in independent media as the sole producer and host of a syndicated public affairs radio program, "Indigenous Politics: From Native New England and Beyond", and part of a collective that produces another radio program, "Horizontal Power Hour", which features anarchist and other radical politics.

  • Twenty-First-Century Indigenous Politics
  • From Hawai'i to Palestine: Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and the Politics of Occupation
  • Hawaiian Women and the Nationalist Politics of Indigeneity
  • Land and Sovereignty Politics in Hawai'i
  • The Paradox of Hawaiian Nationalism
  • The Legal Construction of Race and Hawaiian Indigeneity

Harvey J. Kaye

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Harvey J. Kaye is the Ben and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, where he also directs the Center for History and Social Change. An award-winning author and editor committed to the study of the making of American democracy, Kaye has published fifteen books on history, politics, and ideas; has contributed articles and essays to a diverse array of American and international publications; and has appeared as a guest on numerous television and radio programs. His most recent books include Thomas Paine: Firebrand of the Revolution (2000), Are We Good Citizens? (2001), Thomas Paine and the Promise of America (2005), and the forthcoming “The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great.”

  • Thomas Paine and the American Democratic Tradition
  • Thomas Paine and the American Revolution

Michael Kazin

Georgetown University

Michael Kazin is a professor of history at Georgetown University. He is the author, most recently, of American Dreamers: How the Left Changed a Nation (2011) and A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan (2006), and a coeditor of Americanism: New Perspectives on the History of an Ideal (2006). He is the editor-in-chief of the two-volume Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political History (2010) and also serves as the editor of Dissent magazine and an online columnist for The New Republic. He is currently at work on a book about the American opponents of World War I.

  • How to Understand the 1960s and How Not To
  • The Anti-War Movement in the United States during World War I
  • The Causes of Conservative Victory, 1964-2004
  • The Failure and Success of American Radicalism
  • The Use and Abuse of Americanism
  • William Jennings Bryan and the Fate of the Christian Left

New in 2013 2014Jennifer Keene *

Chapman University

Jennifer Keene is a professor of history and the chair of the history department at Chapman University. A specialist in the American experience during World War I, she has written several books on the war: World War I: The American Soldier Experience (2011); Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America (2001); and The United States and the First World War (2000). In addition, she is the lead author for an American history textbook, Visions of America (2nd edition, 2012), that pioneers a visual approach to teaching the U.S. history survey. Keene serves on the advisory board of the International Society for First World War Studies and is an associate editor for the Journal of First World War Studies. She has won many awards and fellowships, including Fulbright senior scholar awards to France and Australia. Her research interests include the American soldier experience, African American soldiers, veteran political activism, war culture, and propaganda.

  • Americans Respond: Perspectives on the Global War, 1914–1917
  • Hemingway: A Typical Doughboy?
  • True Sons of Freedom: African American Soldiers in World War I
  • A "Brutalizing" War? America after World War I
  • Visions of America: The Real Story behind the Photographs

Mary Kelley

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

A past president of the American Studies Association and the Society of Historians of the Early Republic, Mary Kelley is the Ruth Bordin Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has received numerous fellowships and awards, including the New Hampshire Teacher of the Year Award from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The author of several books, including Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America’s Republic (2006), she coedited, with Robert A. Gross, A History of the Book in America, Volume 2: An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790-1840 (2010). She was a Mellon Distinguished Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society in 2013–2014 and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

  • Americans and Their Books: Reading and Writing in Historical Context
  • Dreaming Women's Equality: Past and Present Possibilities
  • Learning to Stand and Speak: Educating Women for Public Life
  • The Challenges and Opportunities of Teaching Women's History

Robin D. G. Kelley

University of California, Los Angeles

Robin D. G. Kelley is the Gary B. Nash Professor of American History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His books include the prizewinning Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original (2009); Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists during the Great Depression (1990); Race Rebels: Culture Politics and the Black Working Class (1994); Yo’ Mama’s DisFunktional!: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America (1997), which was selected one of the top ten books of the year by the Village Voice; and Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination (2002). He is a coauthor of Three Strikes: Miners, Musicians, Salesgirls, and the Fighting Spirit of Labor’s Last Century (2001) and a coeditor of Black, Brown, and Beige: Surrealist Writings from Africa and the Diaspora (2009), recipient of an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation; and To Make Our World Anew: A History of African Americans (2005). His most recent book is Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times (2012).

  • John (and Michael) Brown's Body: Meditations on War, Race, and Freedom
  • The Education of Grace Halsell: An Intimate History of the American Century
  • The Long Rise and Short Decline of American Democracy

New in 2013 2014Ari Kelman *

Pennsylvania State University

Ari Kelman is McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, where he teaches the Civil War and Reconstruction, the politics of memory, environmental history, and Native American history. He is the author of A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek (2013), which won the Bancroft Prize and the OAH Avery O. Craven Award, among others, and A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans (2003), which won the Vernacular Architecture Forum's Abbott Lowell Cummings Prize. Kelman's essays and articles have appeared in Slate, The Christian Science Monitor, The Nation, The Times Literary Supplement, the Journal of Urban History, the Journal of American History, and many others. Kelman has also contributed to outreach endeavors for K-12 educators and to a variety of public history projects, including documentary films for the History Channel and pbs's "American Experience" series. He has received numerous grants and fellowships, most notably from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Huntington Library. He is now working on two books, "Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War" and "For Liberty and Empire: How the Civil War Bled into the Indian Wars."

  • A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek
  • A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans
  • For Liberty and Empire: How the Civil War Bled into the Indian Wars
  • Katrina in Context: An Environmental History of New Orleans

David Kennedy

Stanford University

David Kennedy is the Donald J. Mclachlan Professor of History, Emeritus, and founding director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. He is the author of several books on American history, including Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (1999), which won the Pulitzer Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize. He received the OAH Distinguished Service Award in 2007.

  • Can the United States Still Afford to Be a Nation of Immigrants?
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Study in Leadership
  • How the United States Won World War II
  • Lessons of Leadership: Dwight Eisenhower as Warrior and President.
  • The Dilemmas of Difference in American Democracy
  • The Great Depression: Causes, Impact, Consequence
  • What the New Deal Did

Linda K. Kerber

University of Iowa

Linda Kerber is May Brodbeck Professor in the Liberal Arts, professor of history, and lecturer in law at the University of Iowa, and a fellow of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her most recent book is the prizewinning No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship (1998). A past president of the OAH, the American Historical Association, and the American Studies Association, Kerber also conducts workshops on the role of learned societies in the historical profession, developing manuscripts from dissertation to book, and other topics of professional interest. She has also worked on strengthening connections between secondary schools and academic historians and on academic exchanges between the United States and Japan.

  • Can the Fourteenth Amendment Defend Itself?
  • Marriage on Trial: Historians and Lawyers in Same-Sex Marriage Cases
  • Statelessness in America
  • Why Diamonds Really Are a Girl's Best Friend, and Other Things You Need to Know about American History

Alice Kessler-Harris

Columbia University

A past president of the OAH, Alice Kessler-Harris teaches American history and women’s studies at Columbia University. Much of her research explores labor, women and gender, and social policy through the experiences of wage-earning women, and utilizes comparative and interdisciplinary frames. In recent years, she has turned to biography as a way of interpreting the past. She is the author most recently of A Difficult Woman: The Challenging Life and Times of Lillian Hellman (2012).

  • Biography after the Fall: Interpreting Radical Lives after the Cold War
  • Dilemmas of Dissent: Lillian Hellman in the McCarthy Era
  • Sex, Lies, and History: The Life and Times of Lillian Hellman

Daniel J. Kevles

Yale University

Stanley Woodward Professor of History at Yale University, Daniel J. Kevles has long taught American history and written extensively about the history of science, technology, and their relationship to American democracy. An elected member of International Academy of the History of Science, he is also a member of the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as the Society of American Historians. His works include The Physicists: The History of a Scientific Community in Modern America (1978); In the Name of Eugenics: Genetics and the Uses of Human Heredity (1985); and Inventing America (2nd edition, 2006), a coauthored history of the United States that integrates science and technology into the American narrative. His latest work is the forthcoming “Vital Properties,” a history of innovation and ownership in plants, animals, and people.

  • Eugenics, the Genome, and Human Rights
  • Human DNA and Human Rights: The Supreme Court, Patents, and the Genes for Breast Cancer
  • Reconstruction from the Right: The United States in the 1970s
  • Science, Arms, and the State in the Twentieth Century
  • The Apples of Our Eyes: Art and Property in American Horticulture

Alexander Keyssar

Harvard University

Alexander Keyssar is the Stirling Professor of History and Social Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His Out of Work: The First Century of Unemployment in Massachusetts (1986) received several scholarly prizes, including the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award; it was also named a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times. He is also author of The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States (2000), which received the AHA Beveridge Prize. He is coauthor of Inventing America: A History of the United States (2nd edition, 2006) and has written widely on public policy issues in the popular press.

  • The Strange Career of the Right to Vote in the United States
  • Why do We Still Have the Electoral College?

Cynthia A. Kierner

George Mason University

Cynthia A. Kierner is a professor of history at George Mason University, where she teaches early American and women's history. She is the author or editor of seven books including the award-winning Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times (2012) and Scandal at Bizarre: Rumor and Reputation in Jefferson's America (2004). Kierner is a past president of Southern Association for Women Historians. Her next major project will examine disasters in America from the colonial period through the Civil War era.

  • A Society of Patriotic Ladies: The Edenton Ladies Tea Party
  • Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Presidents, Politics, and Gender in the Early American Republic
  • Scandal at Bizarre: Sex, Rhetoric, and Reality in Jefferson's America
  • Tea and the Politics of Protest and Commemoration in Revolutionary America
  • Women, Families, and Politics in Revolutionary America

Wilma King

University of Missouri-Columbia

Wilma King holds the Strickland Professorship in African American History and Culture at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She is the author of Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America (2nd edition, 2011), The Essence of Liberty: Free Black Women During the Slave Era (2006), and African American Childhoods: Historical Perspectives from Slavery to Civil Rights (2005).

  • Africa's Progeny in America: African American Children in Historical Perspective, 1600-2000
  • African American Children and the Civil War
  • African American Women and the Civil War
  • The Essence of Liberty: Free African American Women Before Slavery Ended
  • The Life Cycle of Slave Children in the Nineteenth-Century South

Michael J. Klarman

Harvard University

Michael J. Klarman is the Kirkland and Ellis Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and scholarship, which are primarily in the areas of constitutional law and constitutional history. He is the author of several books, including From the Closet to the Altar: Courts, Backlash, and the Struggle for Same-Sex Marriage (2012) and From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality (2004), which won the Bancroft Prize.

  • Brown and the Civil Rights Movement
  • Race and the Constitution in American History
  • Slavery and the Constitution
  • The Civil War and the Constitution
  • The Founding of the Constitution
  • The Supreme Court and Civil Liberties in American History
  • The Supreme Court, Social Change, and Political Backlash
  • Why Brown v. Board of Education Was a Hard Case

New in 2013 2014Wendy Kline *

Purdue University

Wendy Kline is Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine at Purdue University, where she teaches courses on U.S. women's history, the history of sexuality, and the history of medicine. She is the author of two books, Bodies of Knowledge: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Women's Health in the Second Wave (2010) and Building a Better Race: Gender, Sexuality, and Eugenics from the Turn of the Century to the Baby Boom (2001). She is currently writing a book on the history of childbirth in late twentieth-century America.

  • Bodies of Evidence: Activists, Patients, and the FDA Regulation of Depo Provera
  • Coming Home: Modern Midwifery and the Controversy over Home Birth
  • Marriage, Family, and Eugenics in the Twentieth Century
  • Reexamining the Pelvic: Medical Education and the Doctor-Patient Relationship
  • The Making of Our Bodies, Ourselves: Rethinking Women's Health and Second-Wave Feminism

Matthew Klingle

Bowdoin College

Matthew Klingle is an associate professor of history and environmental studies at Bowdoin College. He specializes in urban, environmental, and Western North American history. He is the author of Emerald City: An Environmental History of Seattle (2007), winner of the OAH Ray Allen Billington Prize. A former high school history teacher, he has received Bowdoin’s Sydney B. Karofsky Prize for teaching excellence. He was also a fellow and former trustee of the Environmental Leadership Program. His current research project, funded by an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellowship, explores the environmental and social history of diabetes and chronic disease in America from the late nineteenth century to the present day. He is particularly interested in connecting scholarly research to contemporary environmental concerns as well as primary and secondary history education.

  • Greening Clio: The Role of History in Environmental Studies
  • Metronatural: The Nature of Inequality in the North American City
  • Sweet Blood: Toward an Environmental History of Diabetes and Chronic Disease in Modern America
  • The Nature of History: Teaching Environmental History in Primary and Secondary Schools

James T. Kloppenberg

Harvard University

James T. Kloppenberg is the Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University. He has written about social democracy in Europe and America, American politics and ideas from the seventeenth century to the present, the American philosophy of pragmatism, and the relation between contemporary critical theory and historical writing. His most recent book, Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition (2011), explains the reasons for Barack Obama’s commitments to democratic deliberation and conciliation by examining his intellectual formation and his understanding of American history. His current research projects include “The Intellectual Origins of Democracy in Europe and America,” “The American Democratic Tradition: Roger Williams to Barack Obama,” and an essay collection on the practice of pragmatic hermeneutics in historical writing. In recognition of his teaching, he has been named a Harvard College Professor and has been awarded the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Teaching Prize by the Harvard University Undergraduate Council.

  • Barack Obama and the American Political Tradition
  • Democracy in Theory and Practice since the Ancient World
  • Rethinking Democracy in America from Roger Williams to Barack Obama
  • The Long Shadow of William James: Pragmatism in American Culture since 1870

Richard H. Kohn

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Richard Kohn is a professor emeritus of history and peace, war, and defense at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has served on the faculties of City College of New York, Rutgers University, and the Army and National War Colleges, and as Chief of Air Force History for the U.S. Air Force. In recent years he has concentrated on civil-military relations. He coedited Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil Military Gap and American National Security (2001) and coauthored The Exclusion of Black Soldiers from the Medal of Honor in World War II (1997).

  • Six Myths about Civil-Military Relations in the United States
  • President Barack Obama and the Military
  • How Democracies Control the Military

Peter Kolchin

University of Delaware

Peter Kolchin, the Henry Clay Reed Professor of History at the University of Delaware, is the author of First Freedom: The Responses of Alabama's Blacks to Emancipation and Reconstruction (1972); Unfree Labor: American Slavery and Russian Serfdom (1987); American Slavery, 1619-1877 (1993); and A Sphinx on the American Land: The Nineteenth-Century South in Comparative Perspective (2003). Winner of the Bancroft Prize, the OAH Avery O. Craven Award, and the Southern Historical Association's Charles Sydnor Award, he is working on a comparative study of emancipation and its aftermath in Russia and the U.S. South, a sequel to Unfree Labor. He is also currently the president of the Southern Historical Association.

  • Interpreting and Reinterpreting American Slavery
  • U. S. Emancipation in Comparative Perspective

Virginia Sánchez Korrol

Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Historian Virginia Sánchez Korrol is the author of From Colonia to Community: The History of Puerto Ricans in New York City (1994); a coauthor of Women in Latin America and the Caribbean (1999); and a coeditor with Vicki L. Ruiz of Latina Legacies: Identity, Biography and Community (2005) and the award-winning, three-volume Latinas in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia (2006). She consults on museum exhibits, television documentaries, and educational projects, and serves on the National Parks Service’s American Latino Scholars Panel and on the boards of the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage and the New York Academy of History. She leads “Latinas in History,” an online interactive project, and writes for the Huffington Post. Her most recent publication is Feminist and Abolitionist: The Story of Emilia Casanova (2013), the biography of a nineteenth-century Cuban activist in New York City.

  • Game Changers and Leadership: Latinas in American History
  • Puerto Rican Women Leaders: Challenge and Change in the New York Experience

Robert Korstad

Duke University

Robert Korstad is a professor of public policy studies and history at Duke University where he codirects the Duke Program on History, Public Policy, and Social Change. He is a coauthor of Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (1987) and, with James L. Leloudis, of To Right These Wrongs: The North Carolina Fund and the Battle to End Poverty and Inequality in 1960s America (2010); the author of Civil Rights Unionism: Tobacco Workers and the Struggle for Democracy in the Mid-Twentieth-Century South (2003); and a coeditor of Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Talk About Life in the Segregated South (2001).

  • "Behind the Veil": African American Life in the Jim Crow South
  • America's War on Poverty
  • Civil Rights Unionism
  • The Long Civil Rights Movement: The 1940s
  • The Southern Cotton Mill World

J. Morgan Kousser

California Institute of Technology

J. Morgan Kousser's book, Colorblind Injustice: Minority Voting Rights and the Undoing of the Second Reconstruction (1999), draws on testimony he has delivered as an expert witness in over thirty federal and state voting rights cases and before Congress. The author of more than 150 articles and book reviews, he has lectured extensively at universities in America and England. He is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of History and Social Science at the California Institute of Technology.

  • "Colorblind" Injustice: The Supreme Court and the Counter-Revolution in Voting Rights
  • Do We Still Need The Voting Rights Act?

Alan M. Kraut

American University

Alan M. Kraut is a University Professor of History and International Service at American University, where he has been named Scholar/Teacher of the Year. Immediate past president of the OAH, he is the author or editor of nine books, including the award-winning books Silent Travelers: Germs, Genes, and the "Immigrant Menace" (1994) and Goldberger’s War: The Life and Work of a Public Health Crusader (2003). Most recently, he is a coauthor, with his wife Deborah, of Covenant of Care: Newark Beth Israel and the Jewish Hospital in America (2007) and a coeditor of American Immigration and Ethnicity: A Reader (2005), From Arrival to Incorporation: Migrants to the U.S. in a Global Age (2008), and Ethnic Historians and the Mainstream: Shaping America's Immigration Story (2013). Kraut has served as chair of the Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island History Committee, a consultant to the National Park Service and documentary filmmakers, and an adviser to the Lower East Side Tenement Museum and pbs’s “History Detectives.” He is also a nonresident fellow of the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington think tank on immigration matters.

  • "Forget Your Past": On Becoming American in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
  • Ellis Island: Portal to America in an Age of Migration
  • Fit for America: Immigration, Healthy Bodies, and the American Environment in the Early Twentieth Century
  • Immigration and Work in America: An Historical Perspective
  • Medicine and Music: Joseph Goldberger and George Gershwin Encounter the American South in the Early Twentieth Century
  • Prejudice and Philanthropy: The Rise of Catholic and Jewish Hospitals

New in 2013 2014Barbara Krauthamer *

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Barbara Krauthamer is an associate professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She teaches courses on nineteenth-century African American history, including the history of black women's lives in the Americas. She is the author of Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South (2013) and a coauthor, with Deborah Willis, of Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery (2012), which received an honorable mention in nonfiction from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association, was named a Choice Top 25 outstanding academic book, and received the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in nonfiction. In 2007, Krauthamer received the Association of Black Women Historians' Letitia Brown Memorial Prize. She has also received awards and funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Stanford University, Yale University, the Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. She is currently working on a book about enslaved women's resistance and their strategies for escape and self-liberation in the antebellum South.

  • African Americans and Photography in the Civil War Era
  • Slavery in the Native American South
  • Emancipation and Reconstruction in the Native American South
  • The Politics of Enslaved Women's Self-Liberation

Kevin M. Kruse

Princeton University

A professor of history at Princeton University, Kevin M. Kruse studies the political, social, and urban/suburban history of twentieth-century America, with particular interest in the making of modern conservatism. Focusing on conflicts over race, rights, and religion, he also studies the postwar South and modern suburbia. Kruse is the author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (2005) and a coeditor of three collections: The New Suburban History (2006); Spaces of the Modern City (2008); and Fog of War: The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement (2012). He is currently completing a study of the making of American religious nationalism in the mid-twentieth century, “One Nation under God: Corporations, Christianity, and the Roots of the Religious Right,” and cowriting a history of the United States since 1974 with Julian Zelizer.

  • One Nation under God: Corporations, Christianity, and the Rise of Religious Nationalism
  • White Flight: Segregationist "Rights" and Resistance

Jon Kukla

Independent historian

Jon Kukla is a recognized authority on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American history, with special emphasis on Virginia. Former director of Red Hill Patrick Henry National Memorial and the Historic New Orleans Collection, he has also written extensively about American history and culture for the major historical journals and in several books, including A Wilderness So Immense: The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America (2003) and Mr. Jefferson's Women (2007). An adjunct at the University or Richmond's Jepson School of Leadership Studies, he is currently finishing a biography of Patrick Henry.

  • A Mysteriously Transcendent Quality? The Secessionist Crisis of 1785-1786
  • All Men Are Created Equal: Thomas Jefferson and Women
  • Everything We Thought We Knew about the Stamp Act . . . Might Be Wrong
  • John Adams, Patrick Henry, and the Elusive Origins of the American Revolution
  • Monroe and Livingston vs. Lewis and Clark: The Louisiana Purchase and American Civic Memory

Bruce Kuklick

University of Pennsylvania

Bruce Kuklick is a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught since 1972. His interest in high politics in the United States and how it is connected to a wider American culture has led him to research projects in a number of different genres of history, ranging from sports to philosophy to film and to academic institutions. He also believes that undergraduate teaching of American history is crucial as a form of civic education and thinks that the best way to convey the results of research is through narratives that explain and analyze historical issues. He has received the university's Richard Dunn Award for teaching as well as its Lindback Award, Abrams Award, and the Senior Class Award. An elected member of the American Philosophical Society, he is the author of numerous books, including a three-volume history of American thought. His most recent books include Blind Oracles: Intellectual and War from Kennan to Kissinger (2006); A Political History of the USA: One Nation under God (2009); and, with Emmanuel Gerard, Murdering Patrice Lumumba (2014).

  • American Heroes of World War II: The Sullivans and "The Fighting Sullivans"
  • Death in the Congo: Murdering Patrice Lumumba
  • The Vietnam War: New Ways of Thinking about It

Regina Kunzel

Princeton University

Regina Kunzel is the Doris Stevens Chair of Women’s Studies and a professor in the departments of history and gender and sexuality studies at Princeton University. She teaches and writes about gender and sexuality in modern American history. Her most recent book, Criminal Intimacy: Sex in Prison and the Uneven History of Modern American Sexuality (2008), was awarded the American Historical Association’s John Boswell Prize, the Modern Language Association’s Alan Bray Memorial Book Award, and the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies. She is also the author of Fallen Women, Problem Girls: Unmarried Mothers and the Professionalization of Social Work, 1890–1945 (1993). Kunzel is currently working on a book on the encounters of sexual- and gender-variant people with psychiatry and psychoanalysis in the mid-twentieth-century United States.

  • "Lessons in Being Gay": Prisoners and Lesbian/Gay Activists, 1970–1985
  • In Treatment: Psychiatry and the Archive of Modern Sexuality
  • Prison and the Uneven History of "Modern" Sexuality

Karen Ordahl Kupperman

New York University

Karen Ordahl Kupperman’s scholarship focuses on the Atlantic world in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Most recently, she has published The Atlantic in World History (2012), an edition of Richard Ligon’s True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados (2011), and a new edition of Major Problems in American Colonial History (3rd edition, 2011). Among her earlier works, Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America (2000) won the American Historical Association’s Prize in Atlantic History and Providence Island, 1630-1641: The Other Puritan Colony (1993) won the American Historical Association's Albert J. Beveridge Award.

  • How to Found a Successful Colony
  • Music as a Mode of Communication in Cross-cultural Encounters
  • The Little Ice Age and its Impact on the Atlantic World
  • Trying to Understand the Other in Early America

New in 2013 2014Lon Kurashige *

University of Southern California

Lon Kurashige is an associate professor of history at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Japanese American Celebration and Conflict: A History of Ethnic Identity and Festival, 1934-1990 (2002), winner of the Association for Asian American Studies' History Book Award. His recent work includes coediting "Conversations in Transpacific History," a special edition of Pacific Historical Review (2014) that will also be published as a book. Kurashige is also a coeditor of Major Problems in Asian American History (2003). He is currently working with a team of historians on new college-level U.S. history textbook and finishing a book about American political debates over anti-Asian racism including policies of immigration exclusion, racial discrimination, and the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

  • Rethinking Racism, Questioning Tolerance: Lessons from Asian American History
  • Reflecting on Ethnic Identity and Community: Lessons from Japanese American History

Peter J. Kuznick

American University

Peter J. Kuznick is an associate professor of history and the director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University. The author of Beyond the Laboratory: Scientists As Political Activists in 1930s America (1987); a coeditor, with James Gilbert, of Rethinking Cold War Culture (2001); and a coauthor, with Akira Kimura, of Rethinking the Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (published in Japanese in 2010) and, with Yuki Tanaka, of Nuclear Power and Hiroshima: The Truth behind the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Power (published in Japanese in 2011), he studies nuclear issues, past and present, and is writing a book about scientists and the Vietnam War. He helped found the Committee for a National Discussion of Nuclear History and Current Policy in 2003, in response to a Smithsonian Enola Gay exhibit, and the Nuclear Education Project. He is also a coauthor, with Oliver Stone, of The Untold History of the United States (2012), a 10-part documentary film series and companion book on the history of the American empire and national security state, and he has also written a screenplay on the early Cold War.

  • Averting a "Disaster Incomprehensible in its Magnitude": Scientists' Opposition to the U.S. Invasion of Vietnam
  • Beyond the Laboratory: Scientists as Political Activists in 1930s and 1960s America
  • Just Like a Bullet: Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Nuclearization of America
  • Lost Cause: Henry Wallace's Struggle to Change the Course of History, 1944-1946
  • The Decision to Risk the Future: Harry Truman and the Atomic Bomb

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Glenn W. Lafantasie

Western Kentucky University

Glenn W. LaFantasie is the Richard Frockt Family Professor of Civil War History at Western Kentucky University. He is the author of Twilight at Little Round Top (2005) and Gettysburg Requiem: The Life and Lost Causes of Confederate Colonel William C. Oates (2006). His most recent book is Gettysburg Heroes: Perfect Soldiers, Hallowed Ground (2008). Over the past thirty years, he has held various positions in the field of public history, including as editor of publications at the Rhode Island Historical Society, deputy historian of the U.S. Department of State, and director of the Aldie Mill Historic Site in Loudoun County, Virginia. He is working on a book, Lincoln and Grant, which will examine the relationship between the Union commander-in-chief and his most successful general.

  • Abraham Lincoln and the American Military Tradition
  • Mystic Chords of Memory: The Civil War Sesquicentennial
  • The Civil War and the Rise of Modern America
  • The Greatness of Abraham Lincoln
  • The Many Meanings of Gettysburg
  • The Mystery of Ulysses S. Grant

Matthew D. Lassiter

University of Michigan

Matthew D. Lassiter is an associate professor of history and of urban and regional planning at the University of Michigan, where he teaches courses about modern U.S. history, urban/suburban history, political history, and the wars on crime and drugs. He is the author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South (2006), winner of the Southern Regional Council’s Lillian Smith Book Award. His Journal of Urban History article, “The Suburban Origins of ‘Color-Blind’ Conservatism: Middle-Class Consciousness in the Charlotte Busing Crisis,” was republished in The Best American History Essays 2006 (2006). He is also a coeditor of The Myth of Southern Exceptionalism (2010) and The Moderates’ Dilemma: Massive Resistance to School Desegregation in Virginia (1998). His current book project is “The Suburban Crisis: The Pursuit and Defense of the American Dream.”

  • Crime in California
  • The Silent Majority
  • The Suburban Crisis
  • The Suburbs and the War on Drugs

Bruce Laurie

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Bruce Laurie is a professor emeritus of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he has taught for more than forty years. His first three books focus on aspects of working-class experience during the nineteenth century. The last of those books, Artisans into Workers: Labor in Nineteenth-Century America (1989), was the first synthetic work of its kind. Since then, he has produced both scholarly and popular work on the topics of American abolitionism and American conservatism, including Beyond Garrison: Antislavery and Social Reform (2005). He is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and has codirected Fulbright seminars for teachers from around the world. His current book project is “Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists.”

  • Antislavery and Abolitionism
  • Modern Conservatism
  • U.S. Labor and Economic History from 1800 to the Present

Jackson Lears

Rutgers University

Jackson Lears is the Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University and the editor-in-chief of Raritan: A Quarterly Review. He is the author of No Place of Grace: Antimodernism and the Transformation of American Culture, 1880-1920 (1981); Fables of Abundance: A Cultural History of Advertising in America (1994), which won the Los Angeles Times Book Award for History; Something for Nothing: Luck in America (2003); and, most recently, Rebirth of a Nation: The Making of Modern America, 1877-1920 (2009). He has also coedited two collections of essays: The Culture of Consumption (1983) and The Power of Culture (1993). An elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has been a regular contributor to the London Review of Books, The New Republic, The Nation, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, and the New York Times, among other publications.

  • The History of Longing: Reconnecting Private and Public
  • The Trigger of History: Rethinking Capitalism and Modernity

Jerry Lembcke

College of the Holy Cross

Jerry Lembcke is an associate professor of sociology at the College of the Holy Cross and the author of seven books, including The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam (1998), cnn’s Tailwind Tail: Inside Vietnam’s Last Great Myth (2003), and Hanoi Jane: War, Sex, and Fantasies of Betrayal (2010). His reviews and opinion pieces have appeared in the American Historical Review, HistoryNewsNet.com, Oral History Review, the Boston Globe, the San Francisco Chronicle, Newsday, and the National Catholic Reporter.

  • ptsd: Diagnosis or Identity for Post-empire America
  • Spat-upon Veterans, Abandoned pows, and "Hanoi Jane": Vietnam and the Making of America's "Great Betrayal" Narrative
  • Spat-upon Vietnam Veterans: Collecting the Stories, Reflecting on Their Meaning

Elizabeth D. Leonard

Colby College

Elizabeth D. Leonard is the John J. and Cornelia V. Gibson Professor of History at Colby College where she also chairs the history department. She is the author of Yankee Women: Gender Battles in the Civil War (1994), All the Daring of the Soldier: Women of the Civil War Armies (1999), Lincoln’s Avengers: Justice, Revenge, and Reunion after the Civil War (2004), Men of Color to Arms! Black Soldiers, Indian Wars, and the Quest for Equality (2010), and Lincoln’s Forgotten Ally: Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky (2011), cowinner of the Lincoln Prize.

  • Black Soldiers in the U.S. Army, 1865-1895
  • Civil War-era Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky
  • The Lincoln Assassination
  • Women in the Civil War

Jan Ellen Lewis

Rutgers University, Newark

Jan Ellen Lewis is the Senior Associate Dean of Faculty and a professor of history at Rutgers University, Newark. A specialist in colonial and early national history, she is the author of The Pursuit of Happiness: Family and Values in Jefferson’s Virginia (1983) and a coeditor of An Emotional History of the United States (1998); Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson: History, Memory, and Civic Culture (1999); and The Revolution of 1800: Democracy, Race, and the New Republic (2002).

  • Civil Liberties in Wartime, 1790-1840
  • Indian Hating, 1763-1764: A Parable
  • Rethinking Women's Suffrage in New Jersey, 1776-1807
  • The Life and Times of Andrew Jackson
  • Thomas Jefferson's Two Families

Alex Lichtenstein

Indiana University

Alex Lichtenstein is an associate professor of history at Indiana University, where he teaches labor history and South African history. He has also taught at Florida International University and Rice University, and has lectured at the University of Cape Town, the University of Belgrade, the University of Genoa, and Nankai University. The author of Twice the Work of Free Labor: The Political Economy of Convict Labor in the New South (1996), he has written widely on the topics of race, labor, and politics in the U.S. South and South Africa, with a focus on the twentieth century.

  • Civil Rights and Anti-Apartheid
  • The American Civil Rights Movement in Global Perspective
  • The Rise and Fall of the American Labor Movement in the Twentieth Century
  • Walt Whitman, Slavery, and Democracy
  • Was There a Southern Strategy? Race, Politics, and Conservatism
  • What is Southern Labor History?
  • What Made Nelson Mandela a Great Leader?

Nelson Lichtenstein

University of California, Santa Barbara

Nelson Lichtenstein holds the MacArthur Foundation Chair in History and directs the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a student of U.S. capitalism in all of its dimensions and has long been particularly interested in its leading players, first studying the automotive industry and now considering Walmart and similar retailers. He is the author, most recently, of The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009) and a coauthor of Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s History, vol. 2 (revised, 2007).

  • Is There Any Hope for Labor? A Look Back and a Glimpse at the Future
  • Leadership in Global Business: How to Distinguish between Hype and History
  • Triumphalism and Apocalypse: How American Intellectuals Have Thought About Capitalism in the Last Century
  • Walmart and World History: How the Big Store is Reshaping Society and Economy
  • Why Clark Kerr's Vision of Higher Education is Still Relevant and Controversial

Allan J. Lichtman

American University

Allan J. Lichtman is professor of history at American University. His areas of scholarship include the American presidency, conservative politics, quantitative methodology, and voting rights and redistricting. He has published more than 100 scholarly and popular articles as well as six books, including, most recently, White Protestant Nation: The Rise of the American Conservative Movement (2008) and The Keys to the White House (revised edition, 2000), which explains and predicts presidential election results. He provides commentary for major U.S. and foreign broadcast companies, and has served as an expert witness in more than 70 federal voting rights and redistricting cases. He has received the Scholar/Teacher Award at American University, the highest faculty award.

  • American Leadership
  • Conservative Politics in Twentieth-Century America
  • The American Presidency: An Overview
  • Voting Rights and Redistricting in Recent American History
  • Who Will Be the Next President of the United States?

Patricia Nelson Limerick

University of Colorado Boulder

President of the OAH, Patricia Nelson Limerick is the faculty director and chair of the board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a professor of history. A former MacArthur Fellow, she is the author of The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West (1987), Something in the Soil: Legacies and Reckonings in the New West (2000), and A Ditch in Time: The City, the West, and Water (2012), among other works, and has served as the president of the American Studies Association and the Western History Association, as well as a vice president of the American Historical Association's Teaching Division.

  • A Ditch in Time: Denver, the West, and Water
  • Historians as Public Intellectuals
  • The Department of the Interior and the American West: Tales of Bureaucracy and Passion
  • Transforming Hindsight into Foresight: Adventures in "Applied History"

Leon F. Litwack

University of California, Berkeley

Leon Litwack is the A.F. and May T. Morrison Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley, and a past president of the OAH and the Southern Historical Association. His publications include North of Slavery: The Negro in the Free States, 1790-1860 (1961); Been in the Storm So Long: The Aftermath of Slavery (1980), winner of the Pulitzer and Francis Parkman prizes; Trouble in Mind: Black Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow (1998); and How Free is Free? The Long Death of Jim Crow (2009). He is writing a sequel to Trouble in Mind that will focus on black southerners from World War II to the civil rights movement.

  • Fight the Power! The Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement
  • On Becoming a Historian
  • Pearl Harbor Blues: Black Americans and World War II
  • The Legacy of the Civil War
  • To Look for America: From Hiroshima to Woodstock (an impressionistic multi-media presentation on American society after 1945, with a focus on the upheaval of the sixties)
  • Trouble in Mind: African Americans and Race Reflections from Jim Crow to the Civil Rights Movement

James Livingston

Rutgers University

A professor of history at Rutgers University, James Livingston started out in economic history, writing on Russia and Western trade in the early modern period. He then moved on to the history of banking reform in the United States, circa 1890–1913, and then on to the cultural revolution residing in the rise of corporate capitalism. Meanwhile, he kept writing on topics in popular culture, from Shakespeare to Disney, and problems of intellectual history, from pragmatism to feminism. His most recent books, Against Thrift: Why Consumer Culture Is Good for the Economy, the Environment, and Your Souls (2011) and The World Turned Inside Out: American Thought and Culture at the End of the Twentieth Century (2009), were explorations of the intersection between cultural, economic, and intellectual history, both intended for general readers. He is now writing a book called “F*%! Work, A Manifesto, ” also intended for readers outside academe.

  • Against Thrift: Why Consumer Culture Is Good for the Economy, the Environment, and Your Soul
  • F%#* Work, A Manifesto: Why Full Employment Is a Bad Idea, or What Is to Be Done When Work Disappears
  • The World Turned Inside Out, or Cartoon Politics: American Thought and Culture at the End of the Twentieth Century
  • Their Great Depression and Ours: Origins, Effects, and Paths to Recovery

James W. Loewen

University of Vermont

James W. Loewen is author of Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High School History Textbook Got Wrong (1995) and Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong (1999), among other books. He has been an expert witness or consultant in more than fifty class action lawsuits, mostly in civil rights, voting rights, employment discrimination, and education. His Sundown Towns (2006) tells how thousands of communities in America excluded African, Chinese, Jewish, or Native Americans between 1890 and 1970s, and how some still do. His Teaching What Really Happened (2009) offers specific methods and information to help K-12 U.S. history teachers go beyond the textbook and get their students excited about doing history. His latest book is The Confederate and Neo-Confederate Reader (2010). He is the recipient of the Spirit of America Award from the National Council for the Social Studies as well as the Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award from the American Sociological Association for his social justice work.

  • Eurocentrism, Afrocentrism, and Multiculturalism
  • Everything Your High School History Textbook Got Wrong about Labor History and Social Class
  • How American History in School and on the Landscape Demeans Native Americans
  • How History Keeps Us Racist, and What to Do About It
  • Sundown Towns
  • The Most Important Era in U.S. History that You Never Heard of, and Why It's Important Today
  • What History Books Don't Tell about Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and John Brown, and Why It Matters

Trish Loughran

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Trish Loughran is an associate professor of English and history at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where she teaches courses on early American literature, politics, and culture. Her research explores the links between art, history, communications technology, and politics from the early Enlightenment to the present, with a special emphasis on material and visual culture. Her first book, The Republic in Print: Print Culture in the Age of U.S. Nation-Building, 1770-1870 (2007) won the Oscar Kenshur Book Prize in Eighteenth-Century Studies.

  • Alexander Gardner, the Civil War, and the National Real: Visual Culture in the 1860s
  • Franklin's Fins: Bodies, Travel, and Print in the Long Eighteenth Century
  • From Nation to Empire to Multitude: Hardt, Negri, and History in Our Time
  • Print Culture: The Factory of Fragments
  • Swimming with Sharks: Six Problems with the Atlantic World Model
  • Twittering in the Past Tense: Social Technologies of the 1850s

Karen Lystra

California State University, Fullerton

A professor of American studies at California State University, Fullerton, Karen Lystra is a nineteenth-century cultural and social historian with a special interest in class, gender, the history of emotions, and private life. The cultural values, rituals, ideologies, and behavior surrounding courtship, marriage, and sexuality are examined in her first book, Searching the Heart: Women, Men, and Romantic Love in Nineteenth-Century America (1989). Her second book, Dangerous Intimacy: The Untold Story of Mark Twain’s Final Years (2004), is a biography focused on the pivotal role that Twain’s inner circle, particularly his youngest daughter Jean, played in the last years of his life. Lystra is currently working on a book about nineteenth-century working-class Americans.

  • "And Tell Me Poet, Can Love Exist in Slavery?" Letters of the Unfree before Emancipation
  • Imagining the Eternal Village: Death and Working-Class Intimacy in Nineteenth-Century America
  • Intimate Lives: Sex and Love in Victorian America
  • Love Letters: Revealing the Intimate Past
  • Mark Twain's Autobiography Reconsidered: The Late Years
  • Please Excuse All Mistakes: Working-Class Literacy and Writing in Nineteenth-Century America
  • Roses are Red and Violets Are Blue: Emotional History in Rhyme
  • Victorian Courtship Rituals and the Dramas of Private Life: Testing Romantic Love
  • Working-Class Courtship As Tribal Ritual: Non-Romantic Mate Selection in the Nineteenth-Century U.S. Laboring Class

Kelly Lytle Hernandez

University of California, Los Angeles

Kelly Lytle Hernandez, an associate professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, is a twentieth-century U.S. historian. Her book, Migra! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (2010), is the first comprehensive study of U.S. immigration law enforcement. Drawing on original research conducted in the United States and Mexico, Lytle Hernandez chronicles the Border Patrol’s rise in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. She is currently completing a book on the history of incarceration in the American West.

  • Amnesty or Abolition? Race, Freedom, and the Future of the Illegal Alien
  • Hoboes in Heaven: Tramps, Convict Labor, and the Making of Los Angeles
  • Migra! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol
  • The Making of MexAmerica

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Deborah L. Mack

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Deborah L. Mack is the associate director for community and constituent services at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. An anthropologist by training, she leads a museum division focused on outreach, training, and technical support for African American communities; programs with international organizations; collaborative projects with other institutions, museums, and agencies; and support of alliances and collaborations with cultural service institutions. Mack has advised extensively on museum organizational and strategic planning, on interpretive and exhibition development, and with public resource organizations such as the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

  • "History" Is What We Choose to Remember: Public History in Our Communities
  • Connecting African Sources to African American Interpretation: Evidence and Intellectual Practice
  • Connecting History and Museum Practice
  • New "American" Stories and New "American" Audiences
  • The Meaning of "African American Audiences" in the Twenty-First Century

Nancy MacLean

Duke University

Nancy MacLean is the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. She is the author of Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1994); Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (2006); The Modern Women’s Movement: A Brief History with Documents (2008); and Debating the Conservative Movement: 1945 to the Present, with Donald T. Critchlow (2009). A recipient of numerous scholarly prizes and fellowships, she has also received several teaching awards. She is now working on a history of the half-century-long conservative campaign to privatize public services and decision-making, which focuses on schooling from Brown v. Board of Education to the present.

  • Civil Rights at Work
  • Segregationists and the Surprising History of American Neoliberalism
  • The Quest for Jobs and Justice since the 1950s
  • The Women's Movement and the Workplace

James H. Madison

Indiana University

James H. Madison is an emeritus professor of history at Indiana University. His most recent books are A Lynching in the Heartland: Race and Memory in America (2001), Slinging Doughnuts for the Boys: An American Woman in World War II (2007), World War II: A History in Documents (2010), and Hoosiers: A New History of Indiana (2014).

  • An American Woman in World War II Europe
  • Hoosiers and Indiana's Bicentennial
  • Lynching, Race, and Memory in Twentieth-Century America
  • Teaching with Primary Sources: World War II
  • What We've Learned About World War II

Chandra Manning

Georgetown University

Chandra Manning teaches nineteenth-century U.S. history at Georgetown University. Her first book, What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery and the Civil War (2007), won the OAH Avery O. Craven Award and received honorable mentions in the Lincoln Prize, the Jefferson Davis Prize, and the Virginia Literary Award in Nonfiction competitions. She is working on a book about contraband camps and the changing relationship between the federal government and African Americans, including former slaves, during and after the Civil War.

  • Civil War Soldiers and Slavery
  • Contraband Camps: Slaves, Union Soldiers, and the Uncertain Beginnings of Freedom
  • Lincoln and Union Soldiers

Maeva Marcus

New-York Historical Society

Maeva Marcus is director of the Graduate Institute for Constitutional History (formerly the Institute for Constitutional Studies) located at the New-York Historical Society and the George Washington University Law School. Past president of the American Society for Legal History, she is editor of the completed eight-volume series, The Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789-1800. Her other publications include Truman and the Steel Seizure Case (1977) and Origins of the Federal Judiciary: Essays on the Judiciary Act of 1789 (1992).

  • George Washington's Appointments to the Supreme Court
  • Is the Supreme Court a Political Institution? An Eighteenth-Century View
  • Judicial Review in the Early Republic
  • Separation of Powers in the Early National Period
  • The Judiciary Act of 1789: Political Compromise or Constitutional Interpretation?

James Marten

Marquette University

James Marten is a professor of history and the chair of the history department at Marquette University, where he teaches courses on the Civil War and on children's history. He is the author of The Children's Civil War (1998), which was selected as an outstanding academic title by Choice magazine; Sing Not War: The Lives of Union and Confederate Veterans in Gilded Age America (2011); and America's Corporal: James Tanner in War and Peace (2014). He is also the editor of Children and War: An Historical Anthology (2002) and Childhood and Child Welfare in the Progressive Era: A Brief History with Documents (2004).

  • A Generation Set Apart: Union Civil War Veterans and Northern Society
  • Children of War: Actors and Victims
  • No Medals, No Monuments: Children during the Civil War

New in 2013 2014Daisy Martin *

Stanford University

Daisy Martin is the director of history performance assessment at the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. Her work focuses on the practice, theory, and research regarding powerful teaching and learning in K-12 history and civics classrooms. Creating open educational resources that are focused on historical thinking has been a key aspect of that work. The former director of history education at http://teachinghistory.org, she also cofounded the Stanford History Education Group and coauthored the award-winning book, Reading Like a Historian: Teaching Literacy in Middle and High School Classrooms (2nd edition, 2012), and the website Historical Thinking Matters. A former California public high school teacher, Martin now works with teacher-candidates at the University of California Santa Cruz and Stanford. Her current projects focus on the research, development, and use of performance-based history assessment and its role in putting historical thinking and literacy at the center of the history classroom.

  • Weaving Worthy Tasks: Designing History Assessments for Historical Thinking and Literacy
  • What’s Historical Thinking Got to Do with the Common Core?
  • Teaching Place-Based Historical Inquiry: The Golden Gate National Recreation Area as Case Study
  • Multiple Stories, Multiple Sources: Engaging Students in Investigating the Dust Bowl and the Nature of History
  • Developing Teacher Workshops for Teaching Historical Investigation

Waldo E. Martin Jr.

University of California, Berkeley

Waldo E. Martin Jr., the Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professor of American History and Citizenship at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author of No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics in Postwar America (2005), as well as Brown v. Board of Education: A Short History With Documents (1998) and The Mind of Frederick Douglass (1985). He is a coauthor, with Mia Bay and Deborah Gray White, of Freedom on My Mind: A History of African Americans, With Documents (2012), and, with Joshua Bloom, of Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party (2013). With Patricia A. Sullivan, he coedited Civil Rights in the United States: An Encyclopedia (2000). Aspects of the modern African American freedom struggle and the history of modern social movements unite his current research and writing interests. He is currently completing "A Change is Gonna Come: The Cultural Politics of the Black Freedom Struggle and the Making of Modern America."

  • From Civil Rights to Black Power: Modern American Identity and Cultural Politics
  • The Modern African American Freedom Struggle
  • The Black Panther Party and the Search for Historical Truth
  • Leadership during the Civil Rights–Black Power Era and Beyond
  • The Enduring Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education

Kate Masur

Northwestern University

Kate Masur is an associate professor of history at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on how Americans came to grips with the end of slavery, both during the Civil War and after it. She is the author of An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C. (2010) and two award-winning articles on race, culture, and politics during the Civil War. Her writing has also appeared in the op-ed pages of the New York Times and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

  • Black Cadets at West Point and the Problem of Social Equality
  • Fugitive Slaves, Military Intelligence, and Civil Rights before the Emancipation Proclamation
  • Passive Black Characters? Stephen Spielberg's Lincoln and the History of Emancipation
  • Remembering Reconstruction

Elaine Tyler May

University of Minnesota

Elaine Tyler May is Regents Professor of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota and a past president of the OAH and the American Studies Association. Her books include America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation (2010); Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era (1988, new edition 2008); Barren in the Promised Land: Childless Americans and the Pursuit of Happiness (1997); Pushing the Limits: American Women, 1940-1961 (1996); and Great Expectations: Marriage and Divorce in Post-Victorian America (1980). She has also written for the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Daily Beast, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Minneapolis Star Tribune, among others. A recent recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation, she is currently working on a book project exploring the quest for security in America.

  • America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation
  • Explosive Issues: Sex, Women, and the Bomb in Post–World War II America
  • Gimme Shelter: The Quest for Security in America

Melani McAlister

The George Washington University

Melani McAlister is an associate professor of American studies and international affairs at the George Washington University, where she teaches courses on the United States in global context, U.S.–Middle East cultural encounters, and U.S. media and cultural history. She is the author of Epic Encounters: Culture, Media, and U.S. Interests in the Middle East (revised edition, 2005) and a coeditor of Religion and Politics in the Contemporary United States (2008). Her current project is “Our God in the World: The Global Visions of American Evangelicals,” a broad study of evangelical internationalism since 1960.

  • Evangelicals and Apartheid: The Struggle among Believers in the United States and South Africa
  • After Iraq: Popular Culture and Public Memory of a Decade of War
  • The Global Visions of U.S. Evangelicals: Foreign Policy, Religious Culture, and the Politics of Suffering

New in 2013 2014Alexis McCrossen *

Southern Methodist University

Alexis McCrossen is a professor of history at Southern Methodist University, where she has taught since 1995. She is a cultural historian of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with research interests in the history of timekeeping, religion, technology, cities, and business. McCrossen is the author of Holy Day, Holiday: The American Sunday (2000) and Marking Modern Times: A History of Clocks, Watches, and Other Timekeepers in American Life (2013). She is also the editor of and a contributor to Land of Necessity: Consumer Culture in the United States-Mexico Borderlands (2009). She is currently working on a history of New Year's observances in the United States since the eighteenth century, investigating individual and household rituals and practices associated with bringing in the new year, as well as the emergence of civic celebrations including Watch Nights at African American churches, the White House's annual New Year's Day reception, Philadelphia's Mummers Parade, New York City's Times Square extravaganza, and Pasadena's Rose Parade and Rose Bowl.

  • The Stroke of Midnight: New Year's Observances during the Civil War Era
  • Clockwatching in the United States
  • Holy Day, Holiday: The American Sunday
  • The FSA-OWI Archive: A Resource for Historians
  • Consumer Culture and Capitalism in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Stephanie McCurry

University of Pennsylvania

Stephanie McCurry is a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and teaching focus on the history of the nineteenth-century United States, particularly on the history of the South and of women and gender, and on the social history of politics. She is the author of Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations, and the Political Culture of the South Carolina Low County (1995), on the antebellum period and the politics of secession in South Carolina, and Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics in the Civil War South (2010).

  • Soldiers' Wives and Confederate Politics
  • The Confederate Debate Over Arming the Slaves
  • The Perfected Republic of White Men: The Confederate Project and Its Undoing

Michael McGerr

Indiana University

Michael McGerr, Paul V. McNutt Professor of History and adjunct professor of African American and African diaspora studies at Indiana University, teaches and writes about modern American history. His most recent books are A Fierce Discontent: The Rise and Fall of the Progressive Movement in America, 1870-1920 (2003) and the forthcoming “'The Public Be Damned': The Kingdom and the Dream of the Vanderbilts.” He is coauthor of Of the People: A History of the United States (2013). He has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and several teaching awards, including Indiana University's Sylvia Bowman Award.

  • "Jazzing Away Prejudice": The Liberating Promise of African American Music
  • Why the 1960s Still Matter
  • Are the One Percent Dangerous?: Lessons from the Gilded Age

Lisa McGirr

Harvard University

Lisa McGirr is professor of history at Harvard University where she teaches twentieth-century U.S. history. Her most recent book, Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right (2001), examines the national Right’s rise from the grassroots. Her current research is focused on the 1920s, revisiting the Sacco-Vanzetti case as well as writing a social and cultural history of national prohibition.

  • American Conservatism and Right-Wing Movements in the Twentieth Century
  • Social and Political History of Prohibition
  • The Origins of the New Right
  • The Sacco-Vanzetti Case in International Perspective

Danielle L. McGuire

Wayne State University

Danielle L. McGuire is an associate professor of history at Wayne State University in Detroit. She is the author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (2010), which won the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award, the Lillian Smith Award, and the Southern Association of Women Historians' Julia Cherry Spruill Award, and received an honorable mention for the OAH Darlene Clark Hine Award. She is also a coeditor, with John Dittmer, of Freedom Rights: New Perspectives in the Civil Rights Movement (2011).

  • "A Tribute to Negro Women Fighters for Freedom": Gender, Memory, and the 1963 March on Washington
  • "The Maid and Mr. Charlie," an Essay by Rosa Parks
  • At the Dark End of the Street; Black Women, Rape, and Resistance
  • It's Alive! Resurrecting the Past
  • Rosa Parks, the Radical
  • The Montgomery Bus Boycott as a Women's Movement for Dignity

Carol L. McKibben

Stanford University

Carol L. McKibben teaches in the history department at Stanford University, where she also directs the public history and public service major. Her teaching and research interests focus on public history, ethnic and race relations, immigration (especially in urban California and the West), and gender and public policy. Before coming to Stanford, she directed the gender and development program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Her first book, Beyond Cannery Row: Sicilian Women, Immigration, and Community in Monterey, California, 1915–99 (2006), considers the experiences of immigrant Sicilian fishing people in Monterey, with a focus on women's roles in the migration experiences of families. She is deeply interested in issues of immigration, especially in places where strategies of inclusion worked, such as military towns in the wake of the 1948 Truman executive order that mandated integration. Her public history project for Seaside, California—the base town connected to Fort Ord—informed her second book, Racial Beachhead: Diversity and Democracy in a Military Town (2011). She is currently at work on a biography of Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson.

  • Civil Rights in the Era of Jesse Jackson, 1966-1990
  • California History and Race Relations
  • Gender and Military Migrations
  • Military Migrations and Race Relations in Midcentury America
  • Public History and Pride of Place in Minority-Majority Cities
  • Race Relations in Military Towns, 1948–2006
  • The Role of Women in Twentieth-Century Immigration Strategies
  • Twentieth-Century U.S. Immigration Policy

Robert J. McMahon

Ohio State University

Robert J. McMahon is the Ralph D. Mershon Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio State University and the Mershon Center for International Security Studies. A specialist in U.S. foreign relations, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War, he has long taught courses on those subjects. McMahon has also lectured widely in the United States as well as in China, Japan, India, South Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, Germany, Ireland, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and Finland. He is the author of several books, including Dean Acheson and the Creation of an American World Order (2009); The Cold War (2003); and The Limits of Empire: The United States and Southeast Asia since World War II (1999). He is also past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.

  • Contested Memory: The Struggle over the Meaning and Legacy of the Vietnam War, 1975-2010
  • Dean Acheson: Architect of the American Century
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Cold War at Home and Abroad
  • Reconsidering the Cold War in the Third World
  • Turning Point: the Vietnam War's Pivotal Years
  • U.S. National Security Policy from Harry S. Truman to John F. Kennedy

Sally G. McMillen

Davidson College

After moving from California to the South, Sally G. McMillen became fascinated by the region and the role of women there. Currently she is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History at Davidson College in North Carolina, where she has taught since 1988. A prizewinning teacher, she is also the author of Motherhood in the Old South: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Infant Rearing (1990); the textbook Southern Women: Black and White in the Old South (1991, 2002); To Raise Up the South: Sunday Schools in Black and White Churches, 1865-1915 (2002); and most recently, Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement (2008). She is completing a biography of Lucy Stone.

  • Seneca Falls, 1848, and Women's Fight for Equality
  • Southern Women: Myth and Reality
  • To Raise Up the South: The Southern Sunday School, 1865-1915
  • Passionate Crusader: Lucy Stone

Alan McPherson

University of Oklahoma

Alan McPherson is ConocoPhillips Petroleum Chair of Latin American Studies, a professor of international and area studies, and the director of the Center for the Americas at the University of Oklahoma. A historian by training, he is the author most recently of The Invaded: How Latin Americans and their Allies Fought and Ended U.S. Occupations (2014); Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations (2003), winner of the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies' A. B. Thomas Award; and Intimate Ties, Bitter Struggles: The United States and Latin America since 1945 (2006). He is also the editor of Anti-Americanism in Latin America and the Caribbean (2006); The Anti-American Century (2007), with Ivan Krastev; and The Encyclopedia of U.S. Military Interventions in Latin America (2013). He has appeared as a television commentator, has published op-ed pieces, and has given approximately 100 talks nationally and internationally.

  • U.S. Occupations in Latin America and Their Relevance Today
  • U.S.-Latin American Relations Past and Present
  • Weapons of the Weak Revisited: Anti-Imperialist Courts in Latin America
  • Why Do They Hate Us? Questioning the Question
  • Women and U.S. Occupations in Latin America

Edna Greene Medford

Howard University

Edna Greene Medford is a professor of history at Howard University, where she teaches courses on Jacksonian America, Civil War and Reconstruction, nineteenth-century history, and African American history. She is a coauthor of The Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views (2006) and the editor of Historical Perspectives of the African Burial Ground Project: New York Blacks and the Diaspora (2009). She is also a recipient of a 2009 bicentennial edition of the “Order of Lincoln” for her study of the president and the Civil War era.

  • Abraham Lincoln, Slavery, and Race
  • African Americans and the Civil War
  • African Americans and the Meaning of Freedom
  • The Emancipation Proclamation

Joanne Pope Melish

University of Kentucky

Joanne Pope Melish is an associate professor of history at the University of Kentucky, where she teaches American and African American history. Her research focuses on slavery, emancipation, and the development of racial ideologies from the colonial period through Reconstruction, especially in the northern colonies and states. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860 (1998) and is currently working on book project provisionally entitled “Making Black Communities” that investigates how and why the mixed-race neighborhoods of laboring poor in northern cities began to be characterized as “black” and targeted by hostile white mobs in the early nineteenth century

  • American Slave Systems in Comparative Perspective
  • Antebellum Free People of Color: Struggle and Context
  • Intersections of Race and Class in the Northern United States, 1780-1860
  • Northern Slavery and Emancipation

Joanne Meyerowitz

Yale University

Joanne Meyerowitz is the Arthur Unobskey Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University, where she chairs the American studies program and codirects the Yale Research Initiative on the History of Sexualities. A former editor of the Journal of American History, she is the author of How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality (2002) and the editor of Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945–1960 (2004) and History and September 11th (2003).

  • Exporting the Modern American Family: U.S. Foreign Assistance and the Politics of Gender, 1960s-1980s
  • "A Liberal, Modern Movement towards Greater Sexual Freedom": Rethinking Sexuality in the 1950s United States
  • The Curious History of "Sexual Repression"
  • From Modernization to Microcredit: U.S. Involvement in Campaigns against Global Poverty

Tony Michels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tony Michels is George L. Mosse Associate Professor of American Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He teaches courses in American Jewish history, with a special emphasis on immigration, politics, and comparative ethnic history, as well as courses in labor history and radical political movements. His research focuses on the political and cultural history of the Jews. He is author of A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York (2005), winner of the Salo Baron Prize from the American Academy for Jewish Research, and Jewish Radicals: A Documentary History (2012). He is currently working on a book about the relationship of American Jews to Soviet Russia between the 1920s and 1960s.

  • Is America "Different"? A Critique of American Jewish Exceptionalism
  • Will Herberg's Search for God and Socialism
  • New York's Yiddish Cultural Renaissance
  • From Rock & Roll to Rock: The Fracturing of Youth Culture

Ruth Milkman

Graduate Center, City University of New York

A sociologist of labor and labor movements, Ruth Milkman has researched and written on a variety of topics involving work and organized labor in the United States, past and present. Her early research focused on the impact of economic crisis and war on women workers in the 1930s and 1940s. She then studied the restructuring of the U.S. automobile industry and its impact on workers and their union in the 1980s and 1990s. She has also written extensively about low-wage immigrant workers in the United States, analyzing their employment conditions as well as the dynamics of immigrant labor organizing. Most recently, she wrote L.A. Story: Immigrant Workers and the Future of the U.S. Labor Movement (2006) and coedited Rebuilding Labor: Organizing and Organizers in the New Union Movement (2004) and Working for Justice: The L.A. Model of Organizing and Advocacy (2010). After twenty-one years at the University of California, Los Angeles, including a stint directing the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, she is a professor of sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and at the Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, where she also serves as academic director.

  • Immigrant Workers and the U.S. Labor Movement
  • Occupy Wall Street
  • The Politics of Paid Family Leave in Twenty-First-Century America
  • Women and Economic Crisis: Comparing the Great Depression and the Great Recession
  • Women and the U.S. Labor Movement
  • Women's Leadership in the New Immigrant Rights Movement

Marla R. Miller

University of Massachusetts Amherst

The director of the public history program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Marla R. Miller researches and writes about women and work in early America. Her book The Needle’s Eye: Women and Work in the Age of Revolution (2006) is a study of the New England clothing trades before industrialization. She is also the author of Betsy Ross and the Making of America (2010), the first scholarly biography of the much-misunderstood seamtress; the book was a finalist for the Cundhill Prize in History and named as one of the best nonfiction books of the year by the Washington Post. Miller edits the Public History in Historical Perspective book series and is a member of the board of the National Collaborative of Women’s History Sites; she also consults regularly with museums and historic sites across the northeast.

  • Betsy Ross: The Life Behind the Legend
  • Going Public With History: Community History and the Professional Historian
  • Object Lessons: Rewriting the History of Clothing and Community in Federal New England

Clyde A. Milner II

Arkansas State University

Clyde A. Milner II is the founding director of the Ph.D. program in heritage studies and a professor emeritus of history at Arkansas State University. Known for his research, writing, and editing on the history of the American West and of Native Americans, Milner now applies his interest in American regionalism and cultural identity to the Mississippi Delta and the interdisciplinary initiatives of heritage studies. For eighteen of his twenty-six years on the faculty at Utah State University, Milner edited the Western Historical Quarterly. He has written or edited eight books, including two with his wife, Carol O’Connor: the Oxford History of the American West (1994) and As Big as the West: The Pioneer Life of Granville Stuart (2009). A recipient of the Western Historical Association's Award of Merit for outstanding service to the field of Western history, he currently lives in New Mexico.

  • Why Don’t Latter-day Saints Have a Lost Cause?
  • A Big Western Life: The Challenging Biography of Granville Stuart
  • Shared Memories and Misleading Histories: Examples from the American West
  • South by West: Thoughts on Two Regions

New in 2013 2014Andy Mink *

Learn NC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Andy Mink became the executive director of Learn NC at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2012 after working for more than a decade as the director of outreach and education for the Virginia Center for Digital History and the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. He designs and leads professional development programs for K-12 and university educators, using hands-on instructional models. These programs integrate scholarship, innovative technology, and interactive approaches to teaching and learning. Many also provide intensive, inquiry-based fieldwork that focuses on the use of place and experience in the instructional model. A former public school teacher, Mink served as the founding director of the Discovery Program, a nationally recognized middle grades school-within-a-school that emphasized project-based and experiential education. In 2003, the National Society for Experiential Education honored him as the National Educator of the Year. He is currently registered as a master teacher with the National Council of History Education (NCHE) and serves on the executive board of the North Carolina Council for Social Studies and the North Carolina Outward Bound School and on the board of trustees for the NCHE.

  • A Vision of Students Today: Emerging Technologies in the History Classroom
  • Teaching World War I: Meuse-Argonne & Historical Landscape
  • Where Do I Come From? Family History in the Classroom
  • C3 Framework: How to Handle the Common Core Standards in the History Classroom

Jeffrey E. Mirel

University of Michigan

Jeffrey Mirel is the David L. Angus Collegiate Chair of Education, a professor of history, and an associated faculty member in the Center for Russian and East European Studies at University of Michigan. He is the author of The Rise and Fall of an Urban School System: Detroit 1907-81 (2nd edition, 1999), which won book awards from the American Educational Research Association as well as the History of Education Society. He is a coauthor, with David Angus, of The Failed Promise of the American High School, 1890-1995 (1999). His most recent book is Patriotic Pluralism: Americanization Education and European Immigrants (2010), which examines how the struggle over Americanization in the first half of the twentieth century changed immigrants and native-born Americans in positive and lasting ways.

  • "Don't Know Much About History, Don't Know Much Biology": Curriculum Reform and the Problems of American High Schools
  • Negotiating a New Nation: How European Immigrants Responded to Americanization and Changed America in the Process, 1890-1930
  • What Went Wrong in Urban Public Schools? What Can We Do to Fix Them?

New in 2013 2014Charlene Mires *

Rutgers-Camden

Charlene Mires is an associate professor of history and the director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers University-Camden. With research interests in place, memory, and identity, she is the author of Independence Hall in American Memory (2002) and Capital of the World: The Race to Host the United Nations (2013). She is the editor-in-chief of the digital Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia and teaches courses in U.S. history, material culture, urban history, and public history.

  • Capitals of the World: Civic Boosterism at the End of World War II
  • Philadelphia in American History
  • Remembering the American Revolution
  • The City of Selective Memory
  • The Encyclopedia in the Digital Age

Natalia Molina

University of California, San Diego

Associate dean of the division of arts and humanities, Natalia Molina is a professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. Her work sits at the intersections of race, culture, and citizenship. Her first book, Fit to be Citizens? Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879-1939 (2006), winner of the American Historical Association's Norris and Carol Hundley Award, demonstrates how both science and public health shaped the meaning of race in the early twentieth century. Her most recent book, How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts (2014), examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. Molina has published articles in a diverse array of journals including the Radical History Review, Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, and the American Journal of Public Health. She has received awards from the Ford Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, and Mellon Foundation, among others, and she serves on the board of Cal Humanities and on the editorial board for the American Quarterly, and as a council member of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association.

  • The Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park
  • The Historical Power of Racial Scripts: Examining Chicana/o History through a Relational Lens
  • The Long Arc of Dispossession: Racial Capitalism and Contested Citizenship in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands in the Early Twentieth Century

Barbara Molony

Santa Clara University

Past president of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association and the Walter E. Schmidt, S.J., Professor of History at Santa Clara University, Barbara Molony has lectured extensively in North America and overseas. Her recent works include the coedited volumes Asia's New Mothers: Crafting Gender Roles and Childcare Networks in East and Southeast Asian Societies (2008) and Gendering Modern Japanese History (2005) as well as numerous articles on Japanese women's suffrage, the politics of dress, and transnational feminist movements. She is a coauthor of the textbooks Civilizations Past and Present (2007), Modern East Asia: An Integrated History (2012), and the forthcoming "Gender in Modern East Asia," and is completing a biography of Japan's leading suffragist, Ichikawa Fusae.

  • Citizenship and Women's Rights in Japan
  • Gender, Marriage, and Work in Japan
  • Japanese Feminism and the Quandary of War Guilt
  • The Challenge of Feminist Biography
  • The Politics of Dress: Gender, Imperialism, and Modernity

Douglas Monroy

Colorado College

Douglas Monroy is professor of history at the Colorado College. He is author of Thrown among Strangers: The Making of Mexican Culture in Frontier California (1990), winner of the OAH James Rawley Prize; Rebirth: Mexican Los Angeles from the Great Migration to the Great Depression (1999); and The Borders Within: Encounters with Mexico and America (2008), a book of essays on a variety of topics including the missions of California, the novel Ramona, American liberalism and Mexico, and NAFTA and immigration.

  • After the Days of Cows, Fiestas, and Honorable Caballeros: Forging the Californio Legacy
  • Revisioning Ourselves Anew: Mexicans, Americans, and the New World Border
  • The Missions Live: Indians, Priests, Devotion, and Reconciliation
  • When the Past Speaks to Chicano Historians: Mission Indians, Boxers, and Movie Stars
  • Woodrow Wilson's Guns: American Liberalism and the Problem of Mexico

Maria E. Montoya

New York University

Maria E. Montoya is an associate professor of history and the director of undergraduate studies at New York University. She was formerly the director of the Latina/o studies program at the University of Michigan where she also taught history and participated in the Program in American Culture. She is the author of numerous articles and the book Translating Property: The Maxwell Land Grant and the Conflict Over Land in the American West, 1840–1920 (2002). She is currently working on a book about company towns and the origins of health insurance for workers in the American West, focusing particularly on the coal-mining communities associated with the Rockefeller Corporation in Colorado and the World War II-era workers with the Kaiser Corporation in California. She is also the lead author of the forthcoming textbook, “Global Americans: A Social and Global History of the United States.”

  • American Progress: Westward Expansion and the American Dream
  • Creating an American Home: Gender, Geography, and Resistance in America's Company Towns
  • Globalizing U.S. History for Our Students: A Hands-On Talk and Workshop
  • Josephine Roche and Beginning of Modern Health Care, 1928–1950
  • The Mistranslation of Property: Mexican Land Grants and the Legal Conflict Over Land in the American West
  • The Problem of Water Scarcity in the American West in a Comparative Perspective
  • The Real Story of Josefina Montoya, American Girl: Women, Property, and Conquest on the Mexican Frontier
  • Work, Women, and Wobblies: The IWW Strikes in Colorado's Coal Fields, 1927

Deborah Dash Moore

University of Michigan

Deborah Dash Moore is the Frederick C. L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan, where she directs the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies. She is the author of a trilogy covering the history of American Jews in the twentieth century, beginning with the experience of Jews in New York City, then moving on to GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation (2004), and ending with histories of Jews in the postwar decades. Her recent work looks at the visual dimensions of Jewish experience, especially the role of Jewish documentary photographers in shaping perceptions of the modern world. Her books have regularly garnered awards, most recently a National Jewish Book Award for the best book of the year (2013).

  • Immigration in American Jewish History
  • GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation
  • Urban Origins of American Judaism
  • Walkers in the City: Jewish Photographers

New in 2013 2014Leonard N. Moore *

University of Texas, Austin

Leonard N. Moore is a professor of history and an associate vice-president at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has taught since 2007. Prior to that, he was a professor and administrator at Louisiana State University. He is the author of two books that focus on the black urban experience: Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power (2002) and Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina (2010). He is currently working on a book about the 1972 National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana.

  • The Gary Convention and the Future of Black Politics
  • How the Second Great Migration Transformed America
  • ESPN and the Miseducation of Black Males
  • Teaching the Black Power Movement

Bethany Moreton

University of Georgia

An associate professor of history and women’s studies at the University of Georgia, Bethany Moreton teaches and writes about the historical interactions between religious conservatism and the twentieth-century economy. Her first book, To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (2009), won the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for the best first book in U.S. history as well as the American Studies Association's John Hope Franklin Publication Prize for the best book in American studies. She has been a visiting scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and at the Harvard Divinity School, and she was named the 2009 Emerging Scholar in the Humanities by the University of Michigan. She is also a founding faculty member of the all-volunteer Freedom University, which offers college coursework without charge to qualified Georgia high school graduates regardless of immigration status.

  • God, Sex, and Walmart in the Conservative Ascendancy
  • Market Values and Family Values: A Historical Romance
  • Sanctifying Service: Spiritual Responses to Postindustrial Work

Jennifer L. Morgan

New York University

Jennifer L. Morgan is professor of history and of social and cultural analysis at New York University. Her research examines the intersections of gender and race in colonial America, and she is author of Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in the Making of New World Slavery (2004). She is currently at work on a project that considers colonial numeracy, racism, and the rise of the transatlantic slave trade, tentatively entitled “Accounting for the Women in Slavery.”

  • Gender and Slavery in the Atlantic World
  • Partus Sequitur Ventrum: Slave Law and the Histories of Women in Slavery
  • Race and Reproduction
  • ‘Their Great Commoditie:’ Gender, Commodification, and the Origins of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

Philip Morgan

Johns Hopkins University

Philip Morgan is the Harry C. Black Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. His Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry (1998) won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Frederick Douglass Prizes. He is a coeditor, most recently, of the Oxford Handbook of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850 (2011). His other recent works include Arming Slaves: From Classical Times to the Modern Age (2006), Atlantic Diasporas: Jews, Conversos, and Crypto-Jews in the Age of Mercantilism, 1500-1800 (2009), Atlantic History: A Critical Appraisal (2009), and African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry: The Atlantic World and the Gullah Geechee (2010). He is working at the interface of Caribbean and North American history in the early modern era.

  • A Tale of Two Hamiltons: North American and Caribbean Connections
  • African American Life in Early Georgia
  • Black Patriots in Maryland during the Revolutionary War
  • Black Sailors in the Early Modern Atlantic World
  • Caribbean and North American Linkages in the Early Modern Era
  • The World of Books and the World of Slavery: A Jamaican Case Study
  • York: The Slave on the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Kevin Mumford

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Kevin Mumford is a professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he teaches African American history, civil rights, and the history of sexuality. His research looks at long-term social inequalities and the dynamics of oppression and resistance in cities. He is author of Interzones: Black/White Sex Districts in Chicago and New York in the Early Twentieth Century (1997) and Newark: A History of Race, Rights, and Riots in America (2007) and is at work on a study of black gay history from the 1960s to the 1990s.

  • Beyond the Closet: Remaking Black Gay History from the March on Washington to the AIDS Crisis
  • Constructions of Race in U.S. History

Donna Murch

Rutgers University

Donna Murch is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University and a former codirector of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, where she directed the Black Atlantic seminar. Her teaching and research focus on postwar U.S. history, modern African American history, twentieth-century urban studies, and the political economy of drugs. She is the author of Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California (2010), which won the Phillis Wheatley Book Award. The book highlights the importance of urbanization and southern migration to the rise of Bay Area black power, broadening the scholarship of the long civil rights movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth. She is currently researching a new book on the rise of crack cocaine and the war on drugs in Los Angeles, which explores how economic marginalization contributed to the growth of a vibrant and destructive informal economy in illicit drugs.

  • History of the Black Panther Party
  • History of the Black Power Movement (focused on Oakland and California)
  • History of the Urban Rebellions and the Militarization of Policing
  • Impact of Migration on Postwar African American Mobilization
  • Informal and Underground Economy
  • The Political Economy of Crack Cocaine and Its Impact on the African American Community

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N

David Nasaw

Graduate Center, City University of New York

David Nasaw is the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Professor of History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is an elected member of the Society of American Historians, and his historical research and writing over the past decade has taken the form of biographies. He is the author, most recently, of The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy (2012); Andrew Carnegie (2006), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; and The Chief: Life and Times of William Randolph Hearst (2000), winner of the Bancroft Prize and the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize.

  • Andrew Carnegie and the Origins of American Philanthropy
  • Andrew Carnegie: Making Millions and Giving It Away
  • History and Biography
  • Joseph P. Kennedy: Outsider as Insider

New in 2013 2014Michael S. Neiberg *

U.S. Army War College

Michael S. Neiberg is a professor of history in the department of national security and strategy at the U.S. Army War College. He has also taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy and the University of Southern Mississippi. With backgrounds in social history, military history, French history, and American history, Neiberg has published widely on the theme of war in the world, especially in the era of the two world wars. His most recent books are Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I (2011) and The Blood of Free Men: The Liberation of Paris, 1944 (2012).

  • Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of War in 1914
  • America and the World War, 1914–1917

Scott Reynolds Nelson

College of William and Mary

Scott Nelson is Legum Professor of History at the College of William and Mary and the author of Iron Confederacies (1999); Steel Drivin’ Man (2006), which won the OAH Merle Curti Prize; and A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America’s Financial Disasters (2012). A children’s book entitled Ain’t Nothing But a Man: My Quest to Find the Real John Henry (2007) is based on his research. He is a coauthor of A People at War: Civilians and Soldiers in America’s Civil War (2007), and is currently working on a history of the international wheat trade, the Panic of 1873, and the intertwined lives of Dwight Moody, Sigmund Freud, Anton Chekhov, and Rosa Luxemburg.

  • From Mortgage Crisis to Market Meltdown: The Infamous 1870s
  • Take this Hammer: The Death of John Henry and the Birth of Rock 'n' Roll, 1868-1930
  • The Revolution of Little Cans: How the Contents of a Union Soldier's Haversack Internationalized American Industry, 1862-1900
  • What do Historians Do All Day?
  • Who Put the Roar in the Roaring Twenties: How the Federal Reserve Displaced London as the Center of International Finance

Richard S. Newman

Library Company of Philadelphia

Richard Newman directs the Library Company of Philadelphia and specializes in the study of American reformers in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, including early black leaders, abolitionists, and modern environmentalists. He is the author or editor of five books including The Transformation of American Abolitionism (2002) and Freedom's Prophet: Bishop Richard Allen, the AME Church, and the Black Founding Fathers (2008). He is also a coeditor of the book series "Race in the Atlantic World," copublished by the Library Company, and he serves on the advisory councils of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University.

  • "Where There is No Vision the People Perish": Religious Reformers and American Environmentalism from Love Canal to Hurricane Katrina
  • Black Founders: African American Civil Rights Struggles in the Age of Revolution
  • Civil War, Abolition Peace
  • Love Canal and the American Dream: Grassroots Activism at America's Most Notorious Environmental Place
  • Protest in Black and White: African American Writers Confront Atlantic Slavery

Mae M. Ngai

Columbia University

Mae M. Ngai is a professor of history and the Lung Family Professor of Asian American studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching focus on twentieth-century U.S. history, with emphasis on immigration and ethnicity, politics and law, and labor. She is especially interested in problems of nationalism, citizenship, and race as they are produced historically in law and society, in processes of transnational migration, and in the formation of ethno-racial communities. She is the author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004), winner of the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Prize, and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010).

  • A Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea
  • Illegal Immigration: Origins and Consequences

Michelle Nickerson

Loyola University, Chicago

Michelle Nickerson is an associate professor of history at Loyola University, Chicago, where she teaches U.S. women's, gender, urban, and political history. She studies American conservatism, suburbanization, the anti–Vietnam War movement, feminism, and the Cold War. Nickerson is the author of Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right (2012) and a coeditor of Sunbelt Rising: The Politics of Place, Space, and Region (2011). She is also a co-moderator of the Newberry Library's women and gender seminar. She is currently writing about the Camden 28 of the Catholic antiwar movement in 1971.

  • "Burn Draft Cards, Not Cities": The Catholic Left of the Vietnam Era
  • Behind the Scenes: Women Leaders and Conservative Movement Politics, 1950–1965
  • The "New World Order" Conspiracy Theory in American History
  • The Cold-War Origins of Tea-Party Mama Grizzly Activists
  • Women and Modern Conservatism

Gregory Nobles

Georgia Institute of Technology

Gregory H. Nobles is a professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he specializes in early American and environmental history. His most recent book is Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding (2011), coauthored with Alfred F. Young. He is currently working on a new book, "Audubon's 'Great Work': Creating Art, Science, and Self in the New Nation."

  • Ornithological Gothic: The Strange Death of Audubon's Golden Eagle
  • Ornithology and Ordinary People: The Sources of Citizen Science in Audubon's America
  • The American Hunter-Naturalist: Suffering for Science in the New Nation

Kenneth W. Noe

Auburn University

Kenneth W. Noe is the Draughon Professor of Southern History at Auburn University. His specialty is the American Civil War as it occurred in the Upper South and especially in Appalachia. He is author or editor of a number of books on the Civil War era, including most recently Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861 (2010), and The Yellowhammer War: Alabama in the Civil War and Reconstruction (2013), as well as many articles.

  • Civil War Weather
  • Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861
  • The Battle of Perryville
  • The Civil War In Appalachia

Lisa Norling

University of Minnesota

Lisa Norling is associate professor of history at the University of Minnesota, where she teaches courses in U.S. social history, women’s history, and maritime history. She also teaches at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut every summer and serves as a consultant to the USS Constitution Museum in Boston. Her publications include the anthology Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 (1996) and Captain Ahab Had a Wife: New England Women and the Whalefishery 1740-1870 (2000), which won the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award as well as the Lyman Award from the North Atlantic Society for Oceanic History. Her current research focuses on eighteenth-century oceanic travel, especially women’s experiences at sea.

  • Captain Ahab Had a Wife: Sailors' Wives and Widows in Nineteenth-century America
  • Captured at Sea in 1863: Lucy Lord Confronts Confederate Captains and Chinese Corsairs
  • Quaker Wives and Cape Horn Widows: Colonial Women in New England Seaports
  • Sister Sailors and Hen Frigates: American Women at Sea in the Age of Sail
  • Which History? The Battle over K-12 Social Studies Standards in Minnesota

Mary Beth Norton

Cornell University

A Pulitzer Prize finalist, Mary Beth Norton is a specialist in early American history and American women's and gender history. She is the author of several books including Separated by Their Sex: Women in Public and Private in the Colonial Atlantic World (2011); In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (2002); Founding Mothers and Fathers: Gendered Power and the Forming of American Society (1997); and Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 (1980, 1996). She has lectured extensively in the United States and abroad.

  • The Salem Witchcraft Crisis
  • Beyond Boston: The Fate of the Seven Tea Ships of 1773

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Alice O'Connor

University of California, Santa Barbara

Alice O’Connor is a professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a former director of the university’s Washington Center Program in Washington, D.C. She teaches and writes about poverty and wealth, social and urban policy, the politics of knowledge, and the history of organized philanthropy in the United States. Among her publications are Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History (2001), Social Science for What? Philanthropy and the Social Question in a World Turned Rightside Up (2007), and the coedited volumes Urban Inequality: Evidence from Four Cities (2001) and Poverty and Social Welfare in the United States: An Encyclopedia of History, Politics, and Policy (2004). Before joining the university’s faculty in 1995, she was a program officer at the Ford Foundation and the Social Science Research Council and a National Science Foundation fellow at the Center for the Study of Urban Inequality at the University of Chicago. Her current research focuses on wealth and inequality in the post–World War II United States and the origins of the second Gilded Age.

  • America's Forgotten War: Fighting Poverty from the Great Society to the New Gilded Age
  • Financing the Counterrevolution: Conservative Foundations and the Rise of the New Right
  • Narrating the Great Recession: Economic Crisis and the Politics of Economic Reform
  • Narrator in Chief: Presidents and the Politics of Economic Crisis from FDR to Barack Obama
  • The Gilded American Dream: Homeownership, Wealth, and Welfare from the New Deal to the Subprime Crash

Susan Eva O'Donovan

University of Memphis

Susan O'Donovan is professor of history at the University of Memphis; author of Becoming Free in the Cotton South (2007), winner of the OAH James A. Rawley Prize; and coeditor of two volumes from the Freedmen and Southern Society Project. Her current project, “Slaves and the Politics of Disunion,” explores the extent to which enslaved women and men helped shape this formative moral and political debate. She is also a lead participant on the British-based project, “After Slavery: Race, Labour, and Politics in the Post-Emancipation Carolinas,” examining the historical circumstances that gave rise to new and violent forms of racial subordination.

  • Freedom's Many Faces
  • Making Slavery's Cotton
  • The Civil War as the Slaves' War
  • The Genders of Freedom
  • The Politics of Slaves

Margaret O'Mara

University of Washington

Margaret O'Mara, an associate professor of history at the University of Washington, specializes in the political, economic, and urban history of modern America. She is the author of Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Science and the Search for the Next Silicon Valley (2005). She teaches, writes, and speaks on subjects such as the modern presidency, high-tech innovation, urbanism, and the global knowledge economy. From 1993 to 1997 she was a staff member to President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore, working on urban economic development, health care, and welfare reform. The recipient of a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, she is currently exploring the globalization of the technology industry since the 1970s.

  • Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Politics and the Birth of Silicon Valley
  • Global Silicon Valleys: People and Place in a High-Tech World
  • Money and Politics in Modern America
  • Pivotal Tuesdays: Modern Presidential Elections That Made History
  • The Innovative City

James Oakes

Graduate Center, City University of New York

Currently a Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center, James Oakes has been teaching and writing about slavery, antislavery, and the origins of the Civil War for nearly thirty years. Most recently, he is the author of The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics (2007) and Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861–1865 (2012), winner of the Lincoln Prize.

  • "The South Had Slavery but the North Was Racist Too": A Critique of Civil War Neo-Revisionism
  • How Lincoln Matters, and How He Doesn't
  • Rethinking Emancipation

Barbara B. Oberg

Princeton University

Barbara B. Oberg is a senior research scholar in the department of history at Princeton University. She has served as the general editor of the Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton and the editor of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin at Yale University. She is a coauthor, with Doron Ben-Atar, of Federalists Reconsidered (1998) and, with Harry S. Stout, of Benjamin Franklin, Jonathan Edwards, and the Representation of American Culture (1993). She has held the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellowship at the Henry E. Huntington Library as well as fellowships from the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company of Philadelphia, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She is a past president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, the Association for Documentary Editing, and the Society for Textual Scholarship, and a former council chair of the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture. She currently chairs the executive board of the Omohundro Institute and serves on the board of trustees of Colonial Williamsburg as well as on the council of the American Philosophical Society. Her current projects are a book entitled "America in the Age of Franklin and Jefferson" and an edition of Thomas Jefferson's Autobiography.

  • Mr. Jefferson Goes to Washington
  • What Is It to Be a Member of this Nation? Franklin, Jefferson, and Defining Citizenship in the Early Republic

Gary Y. Okihiro

Columbia University

Gary Y. Okihiro is a professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University. He is the author, most recently, of Island World: A History of Hawai’i and the United States (2008) and Pineapple Culture: A History of the Tropical and Temperate Zones (2009). He is a past president of the Association for Asian American Studies and a recipient of the lifetime achievement award from the American Studies Association and Association for Asian American Studies. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of the Ryukyus.

  • Asian American History
  • Asians and Africans in America

Peter S. Onuf

Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, Monticello

A senior research fellow at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and Thomas Jefferson Foundation Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Virginia, Peter S. Onuf has written extensively on sectionalism, federalism, and political economy, with a particular emphasis on the political thought of Thomas Jefferson. Most recently, with his brother, political theorist Nicholas G. Onuf, he collaborated on Nations, Markets, and War: Modern History and the American Civil War (2006), a history of international law and order in the Atlantic states’ system during the Age of Revolutions and early nineteenth century, and a collection of his essays, The Mind of Thomas Jefferson (2007). He is also a cohost, with Ed Ayers and Brian Balogh, of the radio show BackStory with the American History Guys and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Federalism, Sectionalism, and the Union
  • Rethinking the History of American Democracy
  • The Origins of American Exceptionalism
  • Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power
  • Thomas Jefferson and Religion
  • Thomas Jefferson's West
  • Thomas Jefferson, Race, and Slavery

David M. Oshinsky

New York University

David M. Oshinsky directs the division of medical humanities in the department of medicine at New York University, where he is also a professor of history. His books include A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy (1983) and Worse Than Slavery (1996), which garnered the Robert F. Kennedy Prize for distinguished contribution to human rights. His Polio: An American Story (2006) won both the Pulitzer Prize in history and the Hoover Presidential Book Award, and his articles and reviews appear regularly in the New York Times and other national publications.

  • Mississippi Burning: Closing the Case on the Civil Rights Killings of 1964
  • Polio: A Look Back at America's Most Successful Public Health Campaign
  • Senator Joe McCarthy: The Verdict of History

New in 2013 2014Julia Ott *

New School for Social Research

Julia Ott is an associate professor in the history of capitalism and the codirector of the Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at the New School for Social Research and the Eugene Lang College at the New School. She is the author of When Wall Street Met Main Street: The Quest for an Investors' Democracy (2011). Ott specializes in economic history and political history. In her teaching and in her published work, she investigates how financial institutions, practices, and theories influence American political culture and how, in turn, policies and political beliefs shape economic behavior and outcomes.

  • Be a Shareholder in Victory! The Citizen-Investor in the First World War
  • Not All of Us Were Keynesians: The Origins of Supply-Side Economic Policy in the United States
  • Rethinking the Great Crash of 1929
  • Wall Street Is Dead! Long Live Wall Street!

New in 2013 2014Katherine Ott *

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History

Katherine Ott (@amhistcurator) is a curator and historian in the Division of Medicine and Science at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. She works on the history of medicine and the body, disability and bodily difference, and LGBTQ history, among other topics. She has curated exhibitions on the history of disability, HIV and AIDS, polio, acupuncture, and medical devices for altering the human body. Her most recent web exhibition is "EveryBody: An Artifact History of Disability in America". The author of Fevered Lives: Tuberculosis in American Culture since 1870 (1996), she coedited Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics (2002) and The Scrapbook in American Life (2006), and is currently finishing a monograph about some of the major issues involved in interpreting historical objects. She also teaches graduate courses in material culture at the George Washington University.

  • The Object in Disability: People and Things in American History
  • The Real Curators of Constitution Avenue: A Conversation on Public History, Museums, and the Politics of Collecting America
  • History through Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Skin

Ted Ownby

University of Mississippi

Ted Ownby is professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. He is author of Subduing Satan: Religion, Recreation, and Manhood in the Rural South, 1865-1920 (1993), and American Dreams in Mississippi: Consumers, Poverty, and Culture, 1830-1998 (1999), and editor of books on ideas in the Civil Rights era and southern manners. He is working on a book about the conflicting definitions of family life in the twentieth-century American South.

  • Brotherhood and Brotherhoodism in the Civil-Rights-Era South
  • Thinking about a History of the American South in the 1970s
  • Farm Family, Family Crisis, Family Values: Defining Family in the Twentieth-Century South

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T. Michael Parrish

Baylor University

T. Michael Parrish is Linden G. Bowers Professor of American History at Baylor University where he enjoys teaching an undergraduate course on Texas history every semester as well as graduate seminars on the Civil War and Reconstruction, public history, and religion and war in U.S. history. Early in his career, he worked in the rare book and publishing business, and as a research archivist at the Lyndon B. Johnson Library and Museum. He is author of Brothers in Gray: The Civil War Letters of the Pierson Family (1997) and the forthcoming “P. G. T. Beauregard: The Civil War and Southern Power,” among other books, and also serves as editor or coeditor for three Civil War book series.

  • Limited War, Limited Peace: The Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Religion and War in U.S. History
  • Texas and Texans in the Civil War

James T. Patterson

Brown University

James T. Patterson is the Ford Foundation Professor of History emeritus at Brown University, where he taught for thirty years. His research interests include political, legal, and social history, as well as the history of medicine, race relations, and education. His publications include America in the Twentieth Century (5th edition, 2000); The Dread Disease: Cancer and Modern American Culture (1987); Bancroft Prize winner, Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (1996); America’s Struggle Against Poverty in the Twentieth Century (2000); Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy (2001); Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to 9/11 (2005); Freedom Is Not Enough: The Moynihan Report and America’s Struggle over Black Family Life from LBJ to Obama (2010); and The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America (2012).

  • Black Family Life, 1960s to the Present
  • How 1965 Transformed America
  • The Legacy of the Brown v. Board of Education Decision on Race Relations and Schools
  • The U.S.A. from Watergate to 9/11

Gunther Peck

Duke University

Gunther Peck is associate professor in the history department and the Terry Sanford Institute for Public Policy at Duke University where he teaches courses in immigration, labor, western, environmental, and policy history. His first book, Reinventing Free Labor: Padrones and Immigrant Workers in the North American West (2000), won the Phillip Taft award in labor history and the Ray Allen Billington award in frontier history. He is currently working on two book projects: a history of white slavery in Great Britain and the U.S. from the 1820s to the present; and an exploration of changing working-class uses and perceptions of nature in North America.

  • Immigrants and Free Labor in North America, 1865-Present
  • The Nature of Labor: Working-class Visions of the Environment, 1800-Present
  • White Slavery, National Freedoms: Race, Labor, and Sex in the Making of a Transnational Moral Panic

Dylan C. Penningroth

Northwestern University

Dylan C. Penningroth is professor of history at Northwestern University and a research professor at the American Bar Foundation. In 2012, he was named a MacArthur Fellow. He works on African American and legal history, with special interests in the history of slavery and emancipation, and the socio-legal history of civil rights. His book, The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South (2003), won the OAH Avery O. Craven Award.

  • Local Legal Culture and the Hidden History of Civil Rights
  • Legacies of Slavery in West Africa

Elisabeth I. Perry

Saint Louis University

Elisabeth Perry is professor emerita of women’s studies and history at Saint Louis University. An outstanding teacher and lecturer, she is also author of Belle Moskowitz: Feminine Politics and the Exercise of Power in the Age of Alfred E. Smith (1987); The Challenge of Feminist Biography: Writing the Lives of Modern American Women (1992); Women in Action: Rebels and Reformers, 1920-1980 (1995); We Have Come to Stay: American Women and Political Parties, 1880-1960 (1999); and The Gilded Age and Progressive Era: A Student Companion (2006).

  • Eleanor Roosevelt's Political Apprenticeship
  • The Challenge of Feminist Biography
  • The Difference that "Difference" Makes: Reflections on the Election of 2008
  • The Politics of Coeducation in the Nineteenth Century
  • What New York City Women Did With the Vote
  • Why America Has Never Had a Woman President

New in 2013 2014Lewis Perry *

Saint Louis University

Former editor of the Journal of American History, Lewis Perry is a professor emeritus of history at Saint Louis University. He has previously taught at SUNY Buffalo, Indiana University, and Vanderbilt University, and his Intellectual Life in America (1989) is assigned in many classes. Author of many books and articles on antislavery, reform, and American culture, his most recent is the forthcoming book, “Civil Disobedience, An American Tradition.”

  • "Wild, Unaccountable Things": Civil Disobedience in the Struggle for Woman Suffrage
  • Civil Disobedience as an American Tradition
  • Intellectual Life in a Democratic Culture
  • Prologue to the Civil Rights Movement: Interpreting Gandhi to Americans
  • The Antebellum Origins of Civil Disobedience

New in 2013 2014Paula Petrik *

George Mason University

A professor of history at George Mason University, Paula Petrik is the author of No Step Backward: Women and Family on the Rocky Mountain Mining Frontier (1990) and a coeditor, with Elliott West, of Small Worlds: Children and Adolescents in America, 1850-1950 (1992). A recipient of Fulbright, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Smithsonian fellowships as well as an Apple Computer Faculty Internship, among others, she has published articles on women in the American West, the U.S. toy industry, and new media. She is currently working on a history of the Helena, Montana, banks and the Panic of 1893.

  • Getting Started with Digital History
  • Rich Man, Poor Man, Banker Man, Thief: The Rise and Fall of Erastus D. Edgerton, 1886–1898
  • E. T. Wilson and the Banks: A Study in Government Regulation and Service, 1893–1903
  • A Research Odyssey: Reconstructing the Life of Louisa Couselle, Madame and Entrepreneur
  • Capitalists with Rooms: A Social and Economic Analysis of Prostitution in the Nineteenth-Century West

Christopher Phillips

The University of Cincinnati

Christopher Phillips is professor of history at the University of Cincinnati. His research interests are in the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and more specifically, in the American South, with particular interest in the border states. His books have focused upon slavery and freedom, emancipation, war, race, politics, and memory during and after the Civil War era. His current book project is tentatively titled "The Rivers Ran Backward: The Civil War on the Middle Border and the Making of American Regionalism." His work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. From 1999 to 2011, he served as a coeditor of Ohio Valley History, a quarterly journal of regional history. In spring 2014 he is a Fulbright Scholar, in residence at Tomas Bata University, Czech Republic.

  • "Not To Divide the North": The Politics of Dissent in the Western Free States during the Civil War
  • From Border States to Border South: Slavery, Civil War, and the Politics of Identity in the Border Slave States
  • Lincoln's Grasp of War: Conciliation, Emancipation, and the Civil War in the Border States
  • Southern Cross, North Star: The Postwar Politics of Region and War Memory after the Civil War
  • The Roots of Quasi-Freedom: Slavery, Manumission, and the African American Community of Early National Baltimore

Kimberley L. Phillips

Mills College

Kimberley L. Phillips is the provost and dean of the faculty at Mills College. She is the author of War, What Is It Good For?: Black Freedom Struggles and the U.S. Military From World War II to Iraq (2012) and AlabamaNorth: African American Migrants and Working Class Activism (1999) as well as articles on African American music and religion, women’s cultural production, and American cultural politics. Her forthcoming work includes an edited collection of essays, “Fight for the Nation: Blacks and the U.S. Military,” and a biography of Jimi Hendrix.

  • African American Workers
  • African Americans and the U.S. Military
  • Civil Rights
  • Race, Gender, Class and U.S. Cultural Politics in the Twentieth Century
  • Twentieth-century African American Cultural Politics

New in 2013 2014Kim Phillips-Fein *

New York University

Kim Phillips-Fein is an associate professor at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University. She writes about the creation and decline of New Deal liberalism, the rise of conservative politics in the post–World War II United States, the politics of business, and social and political movements that address economic issues and ideas. She is the author of Invisible Hands: The Businessmen's Crusade Against the New Deal (2009). With Julian Zelizer, she is a coeditor of What's Good for Business: Business and American Politics Since World War II (2012). She has written for a wide range of scholarly and popular publications, including the Journal of American History, Labor: Studies in the Working-Class History of the Americas, The Nation, and the New York Times. Currently, she is working on a history of New York City in the 1970s, centered on the city's fiscal crisis.

  • The Rise of the American Right
  • Fear City: The Politics of Urban Fiscal Crisis in the 1970s and After
  • The Business of America: Business and Politics in American History
  • American Capitalism in Historical Perspective
  • Legacies of the New Deal
  • The Roots of Reaganism

Matthew Pinsker

Dickinson College

Matthew Pinsker holds the Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College where he also directs the House Divided Project. He has published two books and numerous articles on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era, including Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home (2003). He has served as a visiting fellow at the National Constitution Center, U.S. Army War College, and the New America Foundation. He regularly leads K-12 teacher workshops on topics such as the Underground Railroad.

  • Boss Lincoln: Understanding Abraham Lincoln's Partisan Leadership
  • Digital History: The Future of the Past
  • How Should We Remember? The Civil War at 150
  • The Underground Railroad and the Coming of the Civil War

Dwight T. Pitcaithley

New Mexico State University

Dwight T. Pitcaithley is a College Professor of History at New Mexico State University. He retired from the National Park Service in 2005 as its Chief Historian, a position he held for ten years. He is a coeditor of The Antiquities Act: A Century of American Archaeology, Historic Preservation, and Nature Conservation (2006) and has contributed chapters to Becoming Historians (2009), Slavery and Public History: The Tough Stuff of American Memory (2006), Preserving Western History (2005), Public History and the Environment (2004), Myth, Memory, and the Making of the American Landscape (2001), and Seeing and Being Seen: Tourism in the American West (2001). A recipient of the OAH Distinguished Service Award, he also is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and a recipient of an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of North Carolina.

  • Confronting the Causes of the Civil War in Public: The National Park Service and American Memory
  • Does the National Park Service have a Future?
  • Mad Men and Spunky Boys: The Search for Constitutional Compromise on the Eve of the Civil War
  • Why Aren't We All Public Historians?

Robert A. Pratt

University of Georgia

Robert A. Pratt is a professor of history at the University of Georgia. He is the author of The Color of Their Skin: Education and Race in Richmond, Virginia, 1954-89 (1992)—named an Outstanding Book by the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in the United States—and We Shall Not Be Moved: The Desegregation of the University of Georgia (2002).

  • Multiculturalism
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • School Desegregation and the History of Brown v. Board of Education
  • The Civil Rights Movement
  • Twentieth-Century Southern and African American History

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Patrick Rael

Bowdoin College

A professor of history at Bowdoin College, Patrick Rael is a specialist in African American history. He is the author of numerous essays and books, including Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865 (2015) and Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North (2002). He is the editor of African American Activism before the Civil War: The Freedom Struggle in the Antebellum North (2008) and a coeditor of Pamphlets of Protest: An Anthology of Early African-American Protest Literature (2001). He has also written extensively about teaching, has contributed to the development of African American history curricula, and for over a decade has led seminars and workshops on teaching American history in primary and secondary schools.

  • Abraham Lincoln's High-Wire Act: Race and Politics before the Civil War
  • African American Activism before the Civil War
  • Chamberlain at Round Top: How Historians Work
  • Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777–1865
  • Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Slave Narratives and the Antislavery Struggle
  • Historical Reflections on the Interracial Struggle to End Slavery
  • Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain in History and Memory: Reappraising America's Heroes
  • Reel Memories: Film and the Popular History of the Civil Rights Movement
  • Roadmaps to History: How to Read and Write Historical Arguments
  • Slaves on Film: Popular Cinema and the Civil War Era
  • What the Fathers Founded: The Constitution, Slavery, and Resistance before the Civil War

Eric Rauchway

University of California, Davis

Eric Rauchway is the author of four books on American history including Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America (2001) and The Great Depression and the New Deal: A Very Short Introduction (2008). A professor of history at the University of California, Davis, where he has taught since 2001, he previously taught modern U.S. history at Oxford University.

  • Bretton Woods and the Postwar Economic Order
  • How Well Did the New Deal Work?
  • Some of That Jazz: The Energetic Disaster of the 1920s
  • The Assassination of William McKinley and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt's America
  • Why Was Theodore Roosevelt an Effective President?

Leslie J. Reagan

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Leslie J. Reagan is an associate professor of history, medicine, gender and women’s studies, and law at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne. She is the author of Dangerous Pregnancies: Mothers, Disabilities, and Abortion in Modern America (2010) and When Abortion Was a Crime: Women, Medicine, and Law in the United States, 1867–1973 (1997), which won the Law and Society Association’s James Willard Hurst Prize and the Social Science History Association’s President’s Book Award. Her current research focuses on Agent Orange, film, and activism in the United States and Vietnam; thalidomide, gender, and the media; the intersections between law and medicine; and the social and legal issues relating to breast cancer and public health.

  • An Epidemic, "Deformed Babies," and the Early Roots of the New Disability Rights Movements
  • Body Counts: Looking at Agent Orange Victims
  • Dangerous Pregnancies: How an Epidemic Pushed Forward Women's Reproductive Rights
  • When Abortion Was a Crime: The American Past, and Present?

Marcus Rediker

University of Pittsburgh

Marcus Rediker is the Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh. He is author of several books, including The Slave Ship: A Human History (2007), which won the George Washington Book Prize, the OAH Merle Curti Award, and the American Historical Association’s James A. Rawley Prize. His latest book is Outlaws of the Atlantic: Sailors, Pirates, and Motley Crews in the Age of Sail (2014).

  • The Amistad Rebellion
  • The Maritime Underground Railroad
  • The Sailor's Yarn

New in 2013 2014Michael Rembis *

University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Michael Rembis is a professor of history at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, where he also directs the Center for Disability Studies. His research interests include the history of institutionalization, mad people's history, and the history of eugenics. His work has won several awards, including the Irving K. Zola Award, given by the Society for Disability Studies to emerging scholars. He is the author of numerous journal articles, essays in edited collections, and a book, Defining Deviance: Sex, Science, and Delinquent Girls, 1890-1960 (2011). Most recently, he is a coeditor of the forthcoming anthology, "Disability Histories," with Susan Burch, and the Oxford "Handbook of Disability History," with Kim E. Nielsen and Catherine J. Kudlick. Rembis and Nielsen are also founding coeditors of the Disability Histories book series with the University of Illinois Press.

  • Disability and Eugenics in Global Context
  • Living Mad Lives in the Shadow of the Asylum
  • Madness and Mass Incarceration in the Neoliberal Era
  • The American Disability Rights Movement

Susan M. Reverby

Wellesley College

Susan M. Reverby is the Marion Butler McLean Professor in the History of Ideas and a professor of women's studies at Wellesley College. A historian of American women, medicine, and nursing, she has edited numerous volumes in these fields and is the author of the prizewinning Ordered to Care: The Dilemma of American Nursing (1987). She is also the author of Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and its Legacy (2009) and the editor of Tuskegee's Truths (2000), considering the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study, run by the U.S. Public Health Service from 1932 to 1972. She was a member of the Legacy Committee that successfully lobbied President Bill Clinton to offer a public apology to the surviving men and their heirs in 1997. She has also served as the consumer representative on the fda's Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices Panel. Her current project is a biography of physician Alan Berkman (1945-2009), a world-renowned HIV/AIDS and global health researcher and only the second doctor in American history arrested as an accessory to murder for his political actions.

  • "Normal Exposure" and Inoculation Syphilis: A Public Health Service "Tuskegee" Doctor in Guatemala, 1946-48
  • Brother Doc: An Unlikely Twentieth-Century American Revolutionary
  • Counter-Narratives: Fact and Fiction in the Tuskegee Syphilis Study

Yevette Richards

George Mason University

Yevette Richards is an associate professor of history and women and gender studies at George Mason University. She is the author of Maida Springer: Pan-Africanist and International Labor Leader (2000) and the oral history Conversations with Maida Springer: A Personal History of Labor, Race, and International Relations (2004). Her research interests include postbellum black intellectual thought, pan-Africanism, and transnational women’s labor activism during the Cold War. She is currently writing a book on the African Labor College in Uganda, which served as a site for Cold War and transnational labor struggles in the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Better Mammies, Wives, and Mothers: Industrial Education for Black Women
  • Gendered Experiences of Pan-African Travel: African Americans in Africa, 1950–1970s
  • Pan-Africanism, Labor, and Civil Rights: The Activism of Maida Springer, George McCray, and A. Philip Randolph
  • The Black Elite and Race Relations in the Postbellum South
  • The Women's Committee: International Labor, Gender, and the Cold War

Heather Cox Richardson

Boston College

Heather Cox Richardson is an expert in the history of America, focusing on politics, economics, Reconstruction, and the West. She is the author of several books on the Civil War and Reconstruction, including, most recently, West From Appomattox: The Reconstruction of America after the Civil War (2007), Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to an American Massacre (2010), and To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party (2014). She is a professor of history at Boston College, where she has taught since 2010.

  • Gilded Ages: Then and Now
  • Reconstruction
  • The History of the Republican Party
  • The Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890

Daniel K. Richter

University of Pennsylvania

Daniel K. Richter is the Richard S. Dunn Director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania. His research and teaching focus on colonial North America and on Native American history before 1800. He is the author of Trade, Land, Power: The Struggle for Eastern North America (2013), Before the Revolution: America’s Ancient Pasts (2011), Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America (2001), and The Ordeal of the Longhouse: The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization (1992). He is also a coeditor of Beyond the Covenant Chain: The Iroquois and Their Neighbors in Indian North America, 1600–1800 (1987) and Friends and Enemies in Penn’s Woods: Colonists, Indians, and the Racial Construction of Pennsylvania (2004).

  • Native Americans and the Colonial Atlantic World
  • The Peopling and Repeopling of Colonial North America
  • To "Clear the King's and Indians' Title": Origins of Land-Cession Treaties in North America

Randy W. Roberts

Purdue University

Randy Roberts’ major interest is the intersection of popular culture and political culture. He has studied personalities from sports, film, and television who have transcended their particular fields and left a footprint on the political landscape. Roberts is Distinguished Professor of History at Purdue University; he was named 2006 U.S. Professor of the Year for the state of Indiana by Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. He is the author of A Team for America: The Army-Navy Game that Rallied a Nation (2011), Joe Louis: Hard Times Man (2010), Jack Dempsey: The Manassa Mauler (expanded edition, 1984), and Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes (1983), and a coauthor of John Wayne American (1995), Heavy Justice: The Trial of Mike Tyson (1994), Where the Domino Fell: America and Vietnam, 1945-1990 (1990), and Winning is the Only Thing: Sports in America since 1945 (1989), among other books. He is also, most recently, the editor of The Rock, the Curse, and the Hub: A Random History of Boston Sports (2005) and a coeditor of Before the Curse: The Chicago Cubs’ Glory Years, 1870–1945 (2012) and Hollywood’s America: United States History through Its Films (2010).

  • Civil Rights in the Ring: Jack Johnson, Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali, and the Struggle over the Color Line
  • John Wayne's America: Why He Still Rides Tall
  • Leadership in Sports: What Made Red Blaik and Bear Bryant Successful Leaders, and How Can I Get Some of That?
  • Leadership in War: Lessons from D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge
  • Popular Culture Goes To War: John Wayne, Joe Louis, Superman, and American Culture during World War II
  • The Clinton Show: Notes on the Postmodern Celebrity
  • The Roone Revolution: Roone Arledge and the Making of Televised Sports
  • Why Joe Louis Matters: Race, Masculinity, and Culture
  • Winning When Winning Mattered Most: Red Blaik, College Football, and World War II

Seth Rockman

Brown University

Seth Rockman is an associate professor of history at Brown University and the author of Welfare Reform in the Early Republic: A Brief History with Documents (2003) and Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore (2009). He specializes in social and labor history, the history of slavery, and the recent historiography of Jacksonian America. He was involved in Brown University’s investigation into its historical connections to the Atlantic slave trade, and he continues to research the relationship of capitalism and slavery. He is now studying northern businesses that manufactured provisions for southern slave plantations in the nineteenth century.

  • Northern Manufacturers, Southern Slavery, and the Antebellum Origins of American Business Ethics
  • Plantation Provisions and the National Economy of Slavery in Antebellum America
  • Seamstresses, Slaves, and the Hidden History of the Star-Spangled Banner
  • What's New about the History of Capitalism?
  • Working for Wages in Frederick Douglass's Baltimore

Daniel T. Rodgers

Princeton University

Daniel T. Rodgers is the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History emeritus at Princeton University, where he taught American cultural and intellectual history for more than thirty years. His award-winning books include The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 (1978); Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics since Independence (1987); and Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (1998). His most recent book, an intellectual history of the 1970s and 1980s entitled The Age of Fracture (2011), won the Bancroft Prize.

  • Age of Fracture: Ideas and Arguments in Late Twentieth-Century America
  • American Ideals, American Arguments: How Ideas Do (and Don't) Matter in the History of Politics
  • Beyond the Nation State: Transnationalizing U.S. History

New in 2013 2014Marc Simon Rodriguez *

Portland State University

Marc Simon Rodriguez is an associate professor of history at Portland State University and the managing editor of the Pacific Historical Review. His first book, The Tejano Diaspora: Mexican Americanism and Ethnic Politics in Texas and Wisconsin (2011), won the National Association of Chicano and Chicana Studies' Texas Nonfiction Book Award. He is also the editor of Repositioning North American Migration History: New Directions in Modern Continental Migration, Citizenship, and Community (2004) and a coeditor, with Anthony Grafton, of Migration in History: Human Migration in Comparative Perspective (2007). Before joining the faculty of Portland State University, Rodriguez taught at Princeton University, the University of Notre Dame, and Indiana University South Bend, where he directed the Civil Rights Heritage Center.

  • Public Art: Latino Murals in Chicago and California
  • Mexican Americans and American Citizenship, 1848 to the Present
  • What Was the "War on Poverty" and Who Won?
  • Tejanos Unbound: Texas-Based Latino Migrants and the Making of the Tejano Diaspora

David R. Roediger

University of Kansas

Foundation Professor of American Studies and History at the University of Kansas, David Roediger has written on U.S. movements for a shorter working day, on the history of radicalism, and on the racial identities of white workers. Most recently, he is the author of How Race Survived U.S. History (2008) and Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Freedom for All (2014), and a coauthor, with Elizabeth Esch, of The Production of Difference: Race and the Management of U.S. Labor (2012), winner of the International Labor History Association Book Award. He is a coeditor of The Big Red Songbook (2007) and has also edited Listening to Revolt: The Selected Writings of George Rawick (2010), W.E.B. Du Bois' John Brown, and Black on White: Black Writers on What It Means to Be White (1998).

  • The Self-Emancipation of U.S. Slaves and Freedom for All

New in 2013 2014Adam Rome *

University of Delaware

A specialist in environmental history, Adam Rome is the author of two books: The Genius of Earth Day: How a 1970 Teach-In Unexpectedly Made the First Green Generation (2013) and The Bulldozer in the Countryside: Suburban Sprawl and the Rise of American Environmentalism (2001), which won the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award. A former editor of Environmental History, he also has written about environmental reform in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era—the period when Americans first tried to stop pollution, conserve natural resources, and preserve wild places and wild creatures. At the University of Delaware, he holds the Unidel Helen Gouldner Chair for the Environment, and he teaches courses in environmental history and environmental nonfiction.

  • The Genius of Earth Day
  • The Environmental History of Fashion
  • Why Do We Have Environmental Problems? Lessons from History

Adam Rothman

Georgetown University

Adam Rothman (@arothmanhistory) is an associate professor of history at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on slavery and abolition in the United States and the Atlantic world. He is the author of Beyond Freedom's Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery (2015) and Slave Country: American Expansion and the Origins of the Deep South (2005), and a coauthor of Major Problems in Atlantic History (2007). He has worked extensively with middle school and high school teachers in the Washington, D.C., area to enrich U.S. history curriculum and teaching.

  • Causes and Consequences of the Louisiana Purchase
  • New Orleans during the Civil War
  • Reading Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia

Joshua Rothman

University of Alabama

Joshua Rothman directs the Summersell Center for the Study of the South at the University of Alabama, where he is also a professor of history specializing in nineteenth-century America and the history of race and slavery. He is the author of Notorious in the Neighborhood: Sex and Families across the Color Line in Virginia, 1787–1861 (2003); Reforming America, 1815–1860 (2009); and Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Story of Capitalism and Slavery in the Age of Jackson (2012), which won the Gulf South Historical Association's Michael Thomason Book Award and the Southern Historical Association's Frank L. and Harriet C. Owsley Prize. He is currently researching a book tentatively entitled "Masters of the Market: The Men Who Made America's Domestic Slave Trade into Big Business."

  • A Speculator's Paradise: Market Capitalism and the Expansion of the Slave South
  • Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Slave Insurrection Scare on the Cotton Frontier
  • Race, Slavery, and the Southern Family
  • Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: Is It True? Why Should We Care?

Andrew J. Rotter

Colgate University

Andrew J. Rotter is professor of history at Colgate University, where he teaches U.S. foreign relations and recent U.S. history. His research focus is U.S.-Asia relations during the Cold War; he is author, most recently, of Hiroshima: The World’s Bomb (2008) and Comrades at Odds: Culture and Indo-U.S. Relations, 1947-1964 (2000). He is particularly interested in cultural approaches to international history, including the use of race, gender, religion, and class as categories of analysis, and he has explored the role of such matters as gesture, appearance, and odor in shaping diplomatic encounters.

  • Empires of the Senses: The British in India, the United States in the Philippines, and the Significance of Seeing, Hearing, Smelling, Tasting, and Touching
  • The Problem of Culture in U.S. Foreign Relations
  • The Vietnam War in Retrospect
  • The World's Bomb: Hiroshima and its Global Impact

E. Anthony Rotundo

Phillips Academy Andover

E. Anthony Rotundo is Alfred E. Stearns Instructor in History and Social Sciences at Phillips Academy Andover. His book, American Manhood: Transitions in Masculinity from the Revolution to the Modern Era (1993), and related articles helped to create and define masculinity as a field of historical study. His research and writing in recent years have focused on manhood and masculinity in the late twentieth century, especially in relation to electoral politics and popular culture.

  • Dreams and Realities: Manhood and Masculinity in Post-War America, 1945–1965
  • The Politics of Toughness: Conservatism, Masculinity, and American Culture in the Late Twentieth Century

Anne Sarah Rubin

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Anne Sarah Rubin is an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is a past president of the Society of Civil War Historians, the author of A Shattered Nation: The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, 1861-1868 (2005), which received the OAH Avery O. Craven Award, and a coauthor of the award-winning Valley of the Shadow, an interactive history of the Civil War in two communities. Her current project is a multimedia study of the memory of Gen. William T. Sherman's March, Sherman's March and America: Mapping Memory, for which she received an ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowship. She is also the author of the companion book, Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory (2014) and a blog http://shermansmarch.org/blog/.

  • "Through the Heart of Dixie": Sherman's March and American Memory
  • New Directions in Digital History
  • What Does George Washington Have to Do with the American Civil War?

Vicki L. Ruiz

University of California, Irvine

An award-winning scholar at the University of California, Irvine, Vicki Ruiz is the author, editor, or coeditor of several books, including From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America (1998); with Ellen Carol DuBois, Unequal Sisters: An Inclusive Reader in U.S. Women’s History (4th edition, 2008); and, with Virginia Sanchez Korrol, Latinas in the U.S.: A Historical Encyclopedia (2006). A past president of the OAH, the American Studies Association, the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, and the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association and current president-elect of the American Historical Association, she is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Society of American Historians. She currently serves on the advisory board of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

  • Las Dos Luisas: Latina Feminist Traditions, 1900-1930
  • Nuestra América: Latino History as U.S. History
  • Big Dreams, Rural Schools: Mexican Americans and Public Education, 1870-1950
  • Portraits of the Past: Latina Political Leaders, 1920–1950

Leila J. Rupp

University of California, Santa Barbara

Leila J. Rupp is a professor of feminist studies and the associate dean of social sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a coeditor, with Susan K. Freeman, of the forthcoming Understanding and Teaching U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History (2014) and the author of Sapphistries: A Global History of Love between Women (2009), A Desired Past: A Short History of Same-Sex Sexuality in America (1999), Worlds of Women: The Making of an International Women’s Movement (1997), and Mobilizing Women for War: German and American Propaganda, 1939-1945 (1978). With Verta Taylor, she coauthored Drag Queens at the 801 Cabaret (2003) and Survival in the Doldrums: The American Women’s Rights Movement, 1945 to the 1960s (1987). Also a coeditor of Feminist Frontiers (9th edition, 2011), she is currently researching queer women on campus.

  • Queering the Past: Integrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History into the U.S. Survey
  • Queer Women in the Hookup Scene
  • The Persistence of Transnational Activism: The Case of the Homophile Movement

Edmund Russell

University of Kansas

Edmund Russell is the Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of United States History at the University of Kansas. His research and teaching have focused on environmental history, the history of technology, and the history of science. He is the author of War and Nature: Fighting Humans and Insects from World War I to Silent Spring (2001), which won the Edelstein Prize; "Evolutionary History: Prospectus for a New Field" (2003), which won the Leopold-Hidy Prize; and Evolutionary History: Uniting History and Biology to Understand Life on Earth (2011). He has also received university and state awards for his teaching.

  • Coevolutionary History
  • Neurohistory: A New Field for Historians
  • The Evolution of the Industrial Revolution: Amerindians, New World Cottons, and Mechanization of the English Cotton Industry
  • War and Nature: Fighting People and Insects with Chemicals from World War I to Silent Spring

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Nick Salvatore

Cornell University

Nick Salvatore is the Maurice and Hinda Neufeld Founders Professor of Industrial Relations and a professor of American studies at Cornell University. He is author of Eugene V. Debs: Citizen and Socialist (1982), which received the Bancroft Prize and the John H. Dunning Prize, and We All Got History: The Memory Books of Amos Webber (1996), which received the New England History Association’s Outstanding Book Prize. His most recent book is Singing in a Strange Land: C.L. Franklin, the Black Church, and the Transformation of America (2003). Franklin (1915-1984) was an influential preacher, committed social activist, and longtime pastor of Detroit’s New Bethel Baptist Church.

  • Capitalism and Democracy in America
  • Singing In A Strange Land: C. L. Franklin's Ministry from Mississippi to Detroit, 1915-1984
  • The Long Exception: Rethinking the Place of the New Deal in American History

George J. Sanchez

University of Southern California

George J. Sanchez is a professor of American studies, ethnicity, and history and vice dean for diversity and strategic initiatives at the University of Southern California. Past president of the American Studies Association and president-elect of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association, he is the author of Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 (1993) and coeditor of the series, "American Crossroads: New Works in Ethnic Studies." He studies both historical and contemporary topics of race, gender, ethnicity, labor, and immigration, and is currently working on a book about the ethnic interaction of Mexican Americans, Japanese Americans, African Americans, and Jews in the Boyle Heights area of East Los Angeles in the twentieth century.

  • Challenging Student Identities: Race and Class in the Undergraduate Classroom
  • Confronting the Contradictions: Diversity and Graduate Education in the Twenty-First Century
  • Natives and Aliens: Drawing Boundaries of Race and Nation in Urban America
  • The Agony of Whiteness: How Jews Moved Out of the Eastside and What Difference It Makes for Race in Los Angeles
  • The Huntington Challenge: Latino History, American Culture, and the Future of Diversity in the United States

New in 2013 2014Scott A. Sandage *

Carnegie Mellon University

Scott A. Sandage is a cultural historian who specializes in the nineteenth-century United States and in the changing aspects of American identity. He is the author of Born Losers: A History of Failure in America (2005) and an abridgement of Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America (2007). His current book project, "Laughing Buffalo: A Tall Tale of Race and Family on the Half-Breed Rez," focuses on mixed-blood families to show how federal Indian policy, court decisions, early anthropologists, folklore, and family traditions have shaped racial identity in the United States. Active as a public historian, he has been a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution, the National Archives, the National Park Service, and the Andy Warhol Museum as well as to the creators of an off-Broadway play, film and radio documentaries, and the 2009 exhibition, "Lincoln in New York: A Bicentennial Celebration." In 1999–2000, he chaired a scholarly panel to recommend inscriptions for the wheelchair sculpture belatedly added to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

  • The History of Failure and the Failure of History
  • Laughing Buffalo: A Tall Tale from the Half-Breed Rez
  • The Strange Career of Lincoln the Loser

A. K. Sandoval-Strausz

University of New Mexico

An associate professor of history and an affiliated faculty member of the law school at the University of New Mexico, A. K. Sandoval-Strausz specializes in urban, legal, architectural, and Latino history. His first book, Hotel: An American History (2007), explores the origins and development of one of the most common building types on the national landscape. It won the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association’s book prize and was named one of the best books of the year by Library Journal. His current book project, “Latino Landscapes,” considers how Latin American immigrants have revitalized and transformed U.S. cities over the past fifty years.

  • "Fling Open the Gates So Wide": How Travel and Public Places Transformed Community and National Identity in the United States, 1789–1876
  • "For the Accommodation of Strangers": The Invention of the Hotel and the Making of a Cosmopolitan America
  • Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of American Cities, 1950–2010
  • The Law of Hospitality and the Struggle for Civil Rights in America

Martha A. Sandweiss

Princeton University

Martha A. Sandweiss is a professor of history at Princeton University. She is the author of Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception across the Color Line (2009), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award as well as the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Print the Legend: Photography and the American West (2002), winner of the OAH Ray Allen Billington Award and the William P. Clements Award; and numerous other books on American photography. She is also a coeditor of The Oxford History of the American West (1994), recipient of the Western Heritage Award and the Western History Association's Caughey Western History Prize. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Rockefeller Foundation, and Yale's Beinecke Library, and she consults broadly on issues relating to the use of visual images in historical research and teaching. She is currently directing a research project about Princeton and slavery, and is at work on a book about the many stories contained in a photograph made at Fort Laramie in 1868.

  • Passing Strange: A Tale of Love and Deception across the Color Line
  • Photography and the American West
  • Picture Stories: Tangled Tales from the Post–Civil War West

Todd L. Savitt

East Carolina University

Todd L. Savitt is a historian of medicine in the Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies and dean of diversity affairs at the Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University. His primary research interests are African American medical history and medical history of the American South and West. He has written on slave health, sickle cell anemia, sudden infant death syndrome, use of African Americans for medical experimentation, the entry of black physicians into the American medical profession, and early African American medical schools and medical journals.

  • Abortion in the Old West: The Trials of Dr. Edwin S. Kellogg of Helena, Montana
  • Educating Black Physicians: The Founding of Medical Schools for African Americans in Nineteenth-Century America
  • Entering a White Profession: Black Physicians in the New South, 1880-1920
  • Race, Medicine, Scientific Authorship, and the Discovery of Sickle Cell Anemia in 1910-1911

Jennifer Scanlon

Bowdoin College

Jennifer Scanlon is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of the Humanities in Gender and Women's Studies at Bowdoin College. Her research interests include women's and feminist history, biography, and consumer culture. An award-winning teacher and scholar, she is the author of Inarticulate Longings: The Ladies' Home Journal, Gender, and the Promises of Consumer Culture (1995) and the editor of Significant Contemporary American Feminists (1999) and The Gender and Consumer Culture Reader (2000). She has also written many scholarly articles on women's and girls' cultural and consumer practices. Her last recent book, Bad Girls Go Everywhere: The Life of Helen Gurley Brown (2009), was named a "Book of the Times" by the New York Times, "Book of the Week" by The Week, and Business Book of the Year by Marketplace. Her current book project, "We Have a Dream: Anna Arnold Hedgeman and America's Freedom Struggles," a biography of the civil rights stalwart, is forthcoming in fall 2015.

  • Born to Shop? Consumerism and the American Woman
  • "A Piece on Cancer While the Water Boils": Women and Their Magazines
  • Understanding and Interpreting a Life: Helen Gurley Brown
  • Sexy from the Start: Female Sexuality and the Second Wave of Feminism
  • We Have a Dream: Anna Arnold Hedgeman and America's Freedom Struggles

Virginia Scharff

University of New Mexico

Virginia Scharff, Distinguished Professor of History and director of the Center for the Southwest at the University of New Mexico and Women of the West Chair at the Autry National Center, specializes in the histories of women and of the American West. Her publications include Taking the Wheel: Women and the Coming of the Motor Age (1991); Present Tense: The United States Since 1945 (1996); Coming of Age: America in the Twentieth Century (1998); Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West (2003); Home Lands: How Women Made the West (2010), coauthored with Carolyn Brucken; and The Women Jefferson Loved (2010). She is editor of Seeing Nature Through Gender (2003). Scharff also writes mystery novels under the nom de plume of Virginia Swift, including Brown-Eyed Girl (2000), Bad Company (2002), Bye, Bye, Love (2004) and Hello, Stranger (2006).

  • Gender and Environmental History
  • Sacagawea, Lewis and Clark, and the West
  • The Women Jefferson Loved
  • Why Women's Movements Matter
  • Women and the West

Patricia Schechter

Portland State University

Patricia Schechter is a professor of history at Portland State University, where she has taught since 1995. She is the author of Ida B. Wells Barnett and American Reform 1880–1930 (2001), which won the Western Association of Women Historians’ Frances Richardson Keller-Sierra Book Prize, and Exploring the Decolonial Imaginary: Four Transnational Lives (2012), as well as a coauthor of Remembering the Power of Words: The Life of an Oregon Activist, Legislator, and Community Leader (2011), which was named an outstanding academic title by Choice magazine. She is also a prizewinning public historian, and her oral history projects, exhibits, and collection-development work have been recognized by the Oral History Association and numerous community groups.

  • Gertrude Stein, Race, and the New Woman
  • Practicing Public History: Feminist Projects and Prospects
  • Puerto Rican Women's Feminism in New York City and Beyond
  • Women and Oklahoma Statehood

New in 2013 2014Tom Scheinfeldt *

University of Connecticut

Tom Scheinfeldt (@foundhistory) is an associate professor of digital media and design and the director of digital humanities in the Digital Media Center at the University of Connecticut. Formerly managing director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, Scheinfeldt has directed several award-winning digital humanities projects, including THATCamp, Omeka, and the September 11 Digital Archive. Trained as a historian of science and a public historian, he has written and lectured extensively about the history of museums and the role of history in culture. Most recently, he contributed to Debates in Digital Humanities (2012) and coedited Hacking the Academy (2013). He blogs about digital humanities and the business of digital humanities at Found History and cohosts the Digital Campus podcast with Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Mills Kelly, and Stephen Robertson. You can also follow him on LinkedIn.

  • Digital Public History in the Twenty-first Century
  • Looks like the Internet: Networks and the Future of Scholarship
  • No Holds Barred: Advice for Historical Organizations in the Digital Age
  • The New Agora: Digital Media and the Return of Public Humanities

Ellen Schrecker

Yeshiva University

Ellen Schrecker is a professor of history at Yeshiva University who has written extensively about the Cold War red scare. Among her books are No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities (1986), The Age of McCarthyism: A Brief History with Documents (1994), and Many Are the Crimes: McCarthyism in America (1998). She has also edited several volumes including Cold War Triumphalism: Exposing the Misuse of History after the Fall of Communism (2004). A former editor of the AAUP’s magazine, Academe, she also writes about academic freedom and the university and has recently published The Lost Soul of Higher Education: Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the University (2010). Her current project is a study of academic freedom in the 1960s and 1970s.

  • Academic Freedom in the United States: A Historical Overview
  • McCarthyism in America: Political Repression during the Early Cold War
  • Political Repression in America from the Puritans to the Patriot Act
  • The Lost Soul of Higher Education: Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the University
  • The 1960s on Campus: Professors, Politics, and the Transformation of American Higher Education

Donna C. Schuele

University of California, Irvine

Donna Schuele is a faculty member in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She teaches courses in civil rights and civil liberties, American constitutional and legal history, gender and law, crime and gender, and family law. She has published in the Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, Western Legal History, California History, and the American Journal of Family Law. Most recently, she contributed the essay, "Love, Honor, and the Power of Law: Probating the Avila Estate in Frontier California," to On the Borders of Love and Power: Families and Kinship in the Intercultural American Southwest (2012). She has published commentaries in the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times, most recently on the topic of gun control. Her research and writing also focus on the nineteenth-century woman suffrage movement; California legal culture, marital property rights, and land law; federalism; and the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • "The Importance of Being Chisholm": Race, Gender, and Politics in the Life of Shirley Chisholm
  • Clinging to Eastern Petticoats? Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and the California Woman Suffrage Movement
  • From Barron v. Baltimore (1833) to McDonald v. Chicago (2010): Gun Control and the Constitution
  • Love, Honor, and the Power of Law: The Transformation of Families and Land in Frontier California
  • The Road to Obamacare Runs through Reagan Country: The Legacy of Nixon's and Reagan's Efforts to Reshape the Supreme Court

Bruce J. Schulman

Boston University

Bruce J. Schulman is William E. Huntington Professor of History at Boston University. He is the author of From Cotton Belt to Sunbelt (1991), Lyndon B. Johnson and American Liberalism (1994), and The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Politics, and Society (2001), and a coeditor of Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s (2007) and The Constitution and Public Policy (2008). Schulman contributes frequently to newspapers and online publications, and has appeared as an expert commentator on numerous television and radio programs. He has won the American Historical Association’s Nancy Lyman Roelker Award for graduate mentorship and has been named the United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States covering the years 1896–1929.

  • Are We A Nation? New Perspectives on the Emergence of Modern America, 1896–1929
  • Changes in Latitude, Changes in Attitude: The 1970s' Shift in American Culture and Politics
  • Electing America: Six Campaigns That Reshaped the Modern United States
  • The Sixties at 50: 1968 and the New American Cultural Politics
  • Thunder on the Right: The Rise of Conservatism in American Politics

New in 2013 2014Susan Schulten *

University of Denver

Susan Schulten is a professor of history and chair of the history department at the University of Denver. She is the author of Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America (2012), which won the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association's Norris and Carol Hundley Award, and The Geographical Imagination in America, 1880–1950 (2001). Her other recent work includes "The Civil War and the Origins of the Colorado Territory," Western Historical Quarterly (spring 2013), which was named the best article in the journal that year. She teaches courses on Lincoln, the Civil War and Reconstruction, America at the turn of the century, the history of American ideas and culture, the Great Depression, the Cold War, war and the presidency, and the methods and philosophy of history. Recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship for her research on the history of cartography, she lectures widely on the Civil War, the history of maps, and American history in general. She also contributes to the New York Times "Disunion" series, which commemorates the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War.

  • Mapping the Nation
  • Cartographic Innovation in the Early Republic
  • Mapping the American Civil War
  • Lincoln, Douglas, and the Fate of a Nation
  • The Civil War and the Origins of the Colorado Territory

Constance B. Schulz

University of South Carolina

Distinguished Professor Emerita Constance Schulz was director or codirector of the award-winning public history program at the University of South Carolina for more than twenty years. She currently directs and serves as senior editor for a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded, born-digital edition of the Papers of the Revolutionary-Era Pinckney Statesmen. Her digital edition of The Writings of Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriott Pinckney Horry (2013) was recognized by Choice as an outstanding academic publication. She has also written on public history education and served as a consultant for colleges and universities establishing public history programs. While a Fulbright lecturer in England and Italy, she studied how museum, archival, and historic preservation activities are carried out in other nations. In her work as an archival educator, she has focused on the importance of archivists' preservation and historians' use of visual images, particularly photographs, for understanding the past, and she has published five books on the representations of individual states in the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information collection of 180,000 images from 1935–1943.

  • Pouring Old Editorial Wine into New Digital Bottles: Scholarly Editing in a Digital Age
  • Like Mother, Like Daughter? Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriott Horry, Plantation Mistresses, 1739–1830
  • Slaves Named and Un-named: Recovering the Lives of the Pinckneys' Enslaved Laborers in a Digital Edition
  • What Did the Great Depression Look Like Here? The FSA/OWI Photographic Collection and State and Local History
  • "I'd Rather Shoot with a Camera than a Gun": Women Photographers of World War II
  • Public History in the University: Possibilities, Practicalities, and Pitfalls

Donald Schwartz

California State University, Long Beach

Donald Schwartz is a professor emeritus of history at California State University Long Beach where he taught for more than twenty years. His research interests include the experience of Holocaust survivors, the role of Quakers in Holocaust rescue attempts, and the teaching of the Holocaust in grades K-12. He is deeply involved with improving the teaching of American history, working with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and with Teaching American History projects as well as serving as executive director of the California Council for History Education. Under the auspices of the Fulbright specialist program, he taught U.S. history at Pannasastra University in Phnom Penh in January 2011.

  • America and the Holocaust
  • Progressivism and the American Eugenics Movement
  • Teaching the Holocaust in K-12 Classrooms
  • The 1950s: Happy Days or Misplaced Nostalgia?
  • The U.S. and Europe: Examining the Dynamics of a Love-Hate Relationship

Thomas Alan Schwartz

Vanderbilt University

Thomas Alan Schwartz is a professor of history at Vanderbilt University. He has written extensively on America’s relations with Europe, especially Germany, and his research concerns alliance politics and the modern American presidency. He teaches courses dealing with the history of U.S. foreign relations, the Vietnam War, and the Middle East. He is currently writing two books: a biography of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and a short history of the Cold War.

  • "Pain That Cannot Forget": September 11th in Historical Perspective
  • Henry Kissinger and the Dilemmas of American Power
  • LBJ Revisionism: The Johnson Years Reconsidered
  • Presidents on Tape, 1962-1973: What Can We Learn From Listening?
  • Realism or Retreat: The Obama Doctrine in Historical Perspective
  • The Cold War as History
  • The Vietnam War as History
  • The Water's Edge: Domestic Politics and American Foreign Policy Reconsidered

Daryl Michael Scott

Howard University

Daryl Michael Scott is a historian of black-white relations in America since the Civil War, southern history, and African American history. A professor of history at Howard University, he is also the author of Contempt and Pity: Social Policy and the Image of the Damaged Black Psyche, 1880–1996 (1997). He is currently researching a work that reexamines white supremacy and Jim Crow entitled “The Lost World of White Nationalism in the American South,” and is also preparing a collection of essays on the sui generis treatment of nationalism in American historiography.

  • A Century of the Black History Movement
  • Race and Nationalism in American History
  • The Golden Age of White Nationalism in the American South, 1877–1910
  • The Myth of Black Nationalism in America
  • The Sudden Decline of White Supremacy in Post–World War II America

New in 2013 2014Peter Seixas *

University of British Columbia

Peter Seixas is a professor and Canada Research Chair in the department of curriculum and pedagogy at the University of British Columbia. Before coming to the university, he taught high-school social studies in Vancouver for fifteen years. He is the founding director of the Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness and the Historical Thinking Project. He is interested in the understandings, representations, and uses of the past in the contrasting settings of schools, academia, and popular culture. He has written numerous articles on historical thinking, history curriculum, and history teaching, and has spoken on these topics nationally and internationally. He is the editor of Theorizing Historical Consciousness (2004) and a coeditor, with Peter Stearns and Sam Wineburg, of Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives (2000). He is a coauthor, with Tom Morton, of The Big Six Historical Thinking Concepts (2013), designed to help teachers incorporate historical thinking into their classes. He has received numerous awards in the United States and Canada for his research, teaching, and service, including the National Council for the Social Studies' Exemplary Research Award, the American Historical Association's William Gilbert Award, awards from British Columbia and Ontario teachers' associations, membership in the Royal Society of Canada, his university's Killam Faculty Teaching Prize, and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for Service to Canada.

  • Assessment of Historical Thinking
  • Teaching Historical Thinking
  • History and Heritage: What's the Difference? (Notes from Canada)

Robert O. Self

Brown University

Robert O. Self is the Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence and a professor of history at Brown University. His areas of expertise are twentieth-century U.S. history, American political culture, and the history of American cities and suburbs. His first book, American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland (2003), examines the transformation of American politics during the civil rights and tax revolt eras, from 1945 through the late 1970s, focusing on Oakland and the East Bay suburbs in California. His second book, All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy since the 1960s (2012), examines the conflicts over gender, sex, and family during the last half century. With James Henretta, Eric Hinderaker, and Rebecca Edwards, Self is also a coauthor of the textbook America's History (8th edition, 2014).

  • Houses, Cars, and Children: The Birth, Life, and Death of Postwar American Consumption
  • The 1970s as History: Utopian Dreams in a Law and Order World
  • The Price of Liberty: The New Right's Sexual Politics from Phyllis Schlafly to Karl Rove

Carole Shammas

University of Southern California

Carole Shammas holds the John R. Hubbard Chair Emerita in History at the University of Southern California and convenes the USC–Huntington Library American Origins seminar. She specializes in the socioeconomic history of North America and the Atlantic world and has written books on inheritance, consumption, and household government. For the past several years she has been investigating the aspirations in early America for a more permanent built environment. Most recently, she edited a collection of essays placing that subject in a global context, Investing in the Early Modern Built Environment: Europeans, Asians, Settlers, and Indigenous Societies (2012). She is currently studying how children in the United States went from being workers to full-time students. Her long-term interest in research methods and design continues.

  • The Three Rs over Three Centuries
  • The Assault on Marriage in the Early Modern Atlantic World
  • The Sorry Built Environment of Early America
  • The Standard of Living over the Past Five Hundred Years
  • Can There Be Too Much Context in Historical Research?

Timothy J. Shannon

Gettysburg College

Timothy J. Shannon teaches early American, Native American, and British history at Gettysburg College. He is the author of several books, including Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier (2008) and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754 (2000), which won the New York State Historical Association's Dixon Ryan Fox Prize and the Society of Colonial Wars' Distinguished Book Award. His articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, the New England Quarterly, and Ethnohistory. His current project is a biography of the eighteenth-century Indian captive Peter Williamson.

  • "Doing Business with Those Barbarians": The Iroquois, Benjamin Franklin, and American Union
  • Clothes along the Mohawk: William Johnson and the Iroquois
  • Indian Captive, Indian King: The Hard Fate and Curious Career of Peter Williamson
  • Queequeg's Tomahawk: Exploring the Material Culture of the Colonial Fur Trade

New in 2013 2014Daniel J. Sharfstein *

Vanderbilt University

Daniel J. Sharfstein is a professor of law at Vanderbilt University, where he teaches American legal history, the legal history of race in the United States, and property law. His book, The Invisible Line: Three American Families and the Secret Journey from Black to White (2011), was awarded the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize for narrative nonfiction, the American Society for Legal History's William Nelson Cromwell Book Prize, and the Law and Society Association’s James Willard Hurst Prize. He has received his university's Hall-Hartman Outstanding Professor Award twice. With support from a Guggenheim fellowship, he is currently writing "Thunder in the Mountains: The Clash of Two American Legends," which explores the Nez Perce War and Reconstruction’s legacy in the American West.

  • Chief Joseph, General Oliver Otis Howard, and the Nez Perce War of 1877: A Clash of Two American Legends
  • The Nez Perce War and Reconstruction's Legacy in the West
  • Law and the Creation of Racial Categories in the United States
  • The Stories We Tell about Race: Law, History, Narrative and the Color Line
  • Negotiating the Invisible Lines of Race: A History of American Families

Stephanie J. Shaw

Ohio State University

Stephanie J. Shaw is a professor of history at Ohio State University where she has also taught in the department of black studies and the Center for Women's Studies. She is the author of What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do: Black Professional Women Workers during the Jim Crow Era (1996) and W. E. B. Du Bois and The Souls of Black Folk (2013) as well as a contributor to The Blackwell Companion to the American South (2002) and a contributing editor of the Harvard Guide to African-American History (2001). Her article "Using the WPA Ex-Slave Narratives to Study the Impact of the Great Depression," published in the Journal of Southern History in August 2003, won the Southern Historical Association's Fletcher M. Green and Charles W. Ramsdell Award for the best article.

  • Female Slave Resistance in the Antebellum South
  • Grandmothering in Antebellum Slave Families and Communities
  • Reading The Souls of Black Folk in the Twenty-First Century
  • Revisiting Du Bois' Talented Tenth Theory
  • Slave Labor and Cotton Production in Antebellum Mississippi
  • The Impact of Antebellum Slave Migrations on Family and Community Life

Aaron Sheehan-Dean

Louisiana State University

Aaron Sheehan-Dean is the Fred C. Frey Chair in Southern Studies at Louisiana State University. He is the author of Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia (2007) and the Concise Historical Atlas of the U.S. Civil War (2008). He is also the editor of The View from the Ground: Experiences of Civil War Soldiers (2007) and Struggle for a Vast Future: The American Civil War (2006), and a coeditor of The Civil War: The First Year of the Conflict Told by Those Who Lived It, November 1860-January 1862 (2011). He has conducted workshops on a variety of topics in U.S. history with elementary, middle, and high school teachers around the country. His current research contextualizes and compares the practices of violence in the American Civil War with other civil and national conflicts in the mid-nineteenth century.

  • After the Battle: The Consequences of the U.S. Civil War
  • Using Maps to Teach the Civil War
  • Was the American Civil War a Just War?

Martin J. Sherwin

George Mason University

Martin J. Sherwin is University Professor of History at George Mason University. His American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (2005), written with Kai Bird, won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Also author of the classic A World Destroyed: The Atomic Bomb and the Grand Alliance (1976), he is currently writing a book entitled Gambling With Armageddon: The Military, the Hawks and the Long Straight Road to the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1945-1962. Sherwin has been twice recognized as “Professor of the Year, Silver Medal” by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, appointed Honorable UNESCO Professor of Humanities at Mendeleyev University in Moscow, and inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as adviser on many documentary films, including the pbs American Experience documentary, “The Trials of J. Robert Oppenheimer.”

  • Hiroshima: Their View, My View, and Why the Debate Will Never End
  • Oppenheimer's Shadow: His Nuclear World and Ours
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis: Old Rum in a New Bottle

Bryant Simon

Temple University

Bryant Simon, professor of history at Temple University, is the author of A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910–1948 (1998) and Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America (2004), and a coeditor of Jumpin’ Jim Crow: Southern Politics from Civil War to Civil Rights (2000). Most recently, he wrote Everything but the Coffee: Learning about America from Starbucks (2009). Currently he is working on a broad-ranging study of the high costs of cheap food built around the tragic story of the fatal factory fire in Hamlet, North Carolina, in 1991 where twenty-five workers died behind locked doors. They made chicken tenders that sold at Shoney's for $1.99, fries and a drink included.

  • Cheap Food and the Political Economy of Recent America
  • Come Back Tom Joad: The Legacy of the 1930s
  • Learning about America from Starbucks
  • The "Real" Boardwalk Empire: Atlantic City and the Making of New Americans

Brooks D. Simpson

Arizona State University

Brooks D. Simpson is an Arizona State University Foundation Professor and the author of several books, including Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph over Adversity, 1822-1865 (2000); The Reconstruction Presidents (1998); America’s Civil War (1996); and Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861-1868 (1991). A historian of nineteenth-century U.S. history and the American presidency, he has written numerous articles and appeared on c-span, npr, and the pbs series,“The American Experience.”

  • American Warlord: Abraham Lincoln as Commander-in-Chief
  • How Freedom Came: The Destruction of Slavery during the Civil War
  • Olive Branch and Sword: The Union Wages Civil War
  • The Fruits of Victory: Ulysses S. Grant after Appomattox
  • Why the Union Won: Victory and Defeat in the American Civil War

Manisha Sinha

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Manisha Sinha is a professor of Afro-American studies and history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is the author of The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina (2000) and the forthcoming "The Slave's Cause: Abolition and the Origins of American Democracy." She is also a coeditor of the two-volume African American Mosaic: A Documentary History from the African Slave Trade to the Twenty-First Century (2004) and Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race, and Power in American History (2007). An elected member of the American Antiquarian Society, she has also received the Chancellor's Medal, the highest honor bestowed on faculty at the University of Massachusetts. Her research interests lie in mid-nineteenth-century U.S. history, especially the history of slavery and abolition, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. She has lectured and published numerous articles on these subjects. She has also written for the New York Times, New York Daily News, The Huffington Post, and the History News Network.

  • Did the Abolitionists Cause the Civil War?
  • A Covenant with Death? The Abolitionist Debate over the U.S. Constitution
  • Allies for Emancipation? Lincoln and Black Abolitionists
  • The Abolitionist International
  • The Woman Question and Abolition
  • Secession as Counterrevolution: Proslavery Thought and the Coming of the Civil War

Suzanne M. Sinke

Florida State University

Suzanne M. Sinke is an associate professor of history at Florida State University. She is the author of Dutch Immigrant Women in the U.S., 1880-1920 (2002), and a coeditor of A Century of European Migrations (1991) and Letters Across Borders (2006). Her current research relates marriage to international migration in the U.S. context, from "bride ships" to matchmaking websites. Her teaching blends comparisons of gender and migration among different countries.

  • Crossing Borders: Globalizing U.S. History through Migration
  • Historiography 101: Comparing Approaches to Migration
  • Marriage through the Mail: Correspondence Marriage across Borders
  • Dreaming of U.S. Citizenship

Sheila L. Skemp

University of Mississippi

The Clare Leslie Marquette Chair in American History at the University of Mississippi, Sheila Skemp teaches classes on colonial and revolutionary America, women and gender, and the “American Dream.” She is the author of First Lady of Letters: Judith Sargent Murray and the Struggle for Women’s Rights (2009) and has also written a number of books and articles about William and Benjamin Franklin, the most recent of which is The Making of a Patriot: Benjamin Franklin at the Cockpit (2012). She was named the university’s Outstanding Teacher in Liberal Arts in 1985 and received its Faculty Achievement Award for Outstanding Teaching and Scholarship in 2009.

  • A Choice of Loyalties: William Franklin and the American Revolution
  • A Family's Civil War: Benjamin and William Franklin and the American Revolution
  • A Transatlantic View of Women's Rights: Judith Sargent Murray and the "Vindication" of Mary Wollstonecraft
  • A World We Have Lost: Benjamin Franklin and the American Dream
  • Lost Women and Lost Woman: The Rediscovery of Judith Sargent Murray

Merritt Roe Smith

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Merritt Roe Smith is the Leverett Howell and William King Cutten Professor of the History of Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1978. He is the author of Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology (1977), winner of the OAH Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the History of Science Society’s Pfizer Award; the editor or coeditor of Does Technology Drive History? (1994), Major Problems in the History of American Technology (1998), and Reconceptualizing the Industrial Revolution (2010); and a coauthor of Inventing America: A History of the United States (2002). Smith is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a past president of the Society for the History of Technology from which he received the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, the society’s highest honor. He currently serves on the national advisory boards of the Thomas A. Edison Papers Project and the public television series, “The American Experience,” and he is currently working on a book about technology during the Civil War era tentatively entitled “Yankee Juggernaut.”

  • Army Ordnance and the American Civil War
  • The American Civil War as a Technological Event
  • The Civil War and the Rise of Big Business in America
  • What Was New and Different about America's Industrial Revolution?

Suzanne E. Smith

George Mason University

Suzanne E. Smith specializes in African American history with a particular interest in exploring how the history of African American entrepreneurship can transform our understanding of African American culture. She regularly teaches courses in African American history, American popular music, and civil rights and citizenship. Her first book, Dancing in the Street: Motown and the Cultural Politics of Detroit (1999), examines Motown and its relationship to the black community of Detroit and the civil rights movement. Her second book, To Serve the Living: Funeral Directors and the African American Way of Death (2010), explores the central role of funeral directors in African American life. She has given numerous radio and television interviews as well as public lectures at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Berklee College of Music, and the National Funeral Directors Association annual meeting. She has also contributed to various documentary projects including "Rachel Carson's Silent Spring" for pbs "American Experience," and "I’ll Make Me A World: African American Arts in the Twentieth Century." Her current research focuses on the history of African American religion in modern America.

  • "Can't Forget the Motor City": Remembering Detroit's Past through Its Music
  • "Dancing in the Street": The Politics of Motown Music
  • "My Man's an Undertaker": Funeral Directors in African American Life
  • "Single Girl, Married Girl": Feminism in Country Music

Terri L. Snyder

California State University, Fullerton

Terri L. Snyder is a professor of American studies at California State University, Fullerton. Her research focuses on the intersections of law, gender, and race in early America, and her most recent book is Brabbling Women: Disorderly Speech and the Law in Early Virginia (2003). She is currently working on two books: "The Power to Die: Slavery and Suicide in America, 1630-1830" and "Women on the Margins: Gender and Freedom in Early America."

  • Slavery and Suicide in North America
  • Women on the Margins of Freedom in the Early American South

Paul R. Spickard

University of California, Santa Barbara

Paul Spickard is a professor of history, Black studies, and Asian American studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Among his many books are Global Mixed Race (2014); Multiple Identities: Migrants, Ethnicity, and Membership (2013); Almost All Aliens: Immigration, Race and Colonialism in American History and Identity (2007); Is Lighter Better? Skin-Tone Discrimination among Asian Americans (2007); Race and Nation: Ethnic Systems in the Modern World (2005); Racial Thinking in the United States (2004); and Mixed Blood: Intermarriage and Ethnic Identity in Twentieth-Century America (1989). He is the winner of the American Studies Association's Richard Yarborough Mentoring Award, for mentoring minority scholars and students, as well as the Mixed Roots Film and Literary Festival's Loving Award.

  • How to Prepare, Attract, and Empower Faculty of Color
  • The Return of Pseudoscientific Racism: DNA Testing, Race, and the New Eugenics Movement
  • Obama Nation: Race, Multiraciality, and American Identity
  • Beyond the Ellis Island Myth: Rethinking Immigration History
  • U.S. Immigration Policy in the 2010s
  • War on Terror, War on Immigrants: Race, Religion, and Membership in America since September 11, 2001
  • Is Lighter Better? Skin-Tone Discrimination among Asian Americans and African Americans
  • Who Are We? Ethnicity and Membership in Europe Today

Marjorie J. Spruill

University of South Carolina

Marjorie J. Spruill is a professor of history at the University of South Carolina. Her best-known works include New Women of the New South: The Leaders of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the Southern States (1993) and an edited volume, One Woman, One Vote: Rediscovering the Woman Suffrage Movement (1995), that accompanied the pbs film "One Woman, One Vote." She is currently writing a book on the rise of the modern women's rights movement in the late 1960s and 1970s, the mobilization of social conservatives as the "Pro-Family Movement" in reaction to the women's movement, and the conflicts between these two movements which contributed to the transformation of American political culture, leading to the highly partisan and polarized political culture in the United States from the late 1970s to the present. This work has received support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the National Humanities Center, and the Gerald Ford Foundation.

  • Divided Legacy: The Civil War, Tradition, and "the Woman Question," 1865-1920
  • Race, Reform, and Reaction: Southern Suffragists, the NAWSA, and the "Southern Strategy" in Context (with images)
  • The Southern Story: The Woman Suffrage Movement in the Inhospitable South (with images)
  • Votes for Women!: The American Suffrage Movement, 1848-1920 (with images)
  • Women's Rights, Family Values, and the Polarization of American Political Culture (with images)

Carole Srole

California State University, Los Angeles

Carole Srole, a professor of gender and labor history at the California State University, Los Angeles, is the author of Transcribing Class and Gender: Masculinity and Femininity in Nineteenth-Century Courts and Offices (2009). Her new book project explores the press conversations about and actual marriages of millionaires and working-class women at the turn of the twentieth century. She received the AHA Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award in 2006.

  • Downton Abbey's American Kin: Upper-Class Marriage and Transnational Celebrity
  • Gender Balances: Changes in Discourses
  • Is It Possible to Enjoy Reading Final Essay Exams? Scaffolding Assignments, Teaching Skills, and History
  • Millionaires Marrying Working Women
  • Reassessing Respectability: Beauty, Fashion, and Gold-Digging in U.S. Offices and Courts at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
  • The Historian's Craft: How to Teach Critiquing

New in 2013 2014Rachel St. John *

New York University

A historian of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century North America, Rachel St. John is an associate professor of history at New York University where she teaches courses in nineteenth-century U.S. history, transnational borderlands history, environmental history, and the history of the American West. She is the author of Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border (2011) and is currently at work on a new book, "The Imagined States of America: Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century North America," which explores the history of the diverse array of nation-building projects that rose and fell across the continent during the long nineteenth century.

  • Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border
  • The Imagined States of America: Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century North America
  • The Imagined America of William McKendree Gwin: Expansion, Secession, and the Unstable Borders of Nineteenth-Century North America

Randall Stephens

Northumbria University

Randall Stephens is a reader in history and American studies at Northumbria University. He is an editor of the magazine Historically Speaking, the author of The Fire Spreads: Holiness and Pentecostalism in the American South (2008), and a coauthor of The Anointed: Evangelical Truth in a Secular Age (2011). His current book project examines the relationship of rock music to American Christianity, beginning with Pentecostals who took to the new genre—Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, James Brown, and Little Richard—and ending with the advent of Christian rock in the 1970s.

  • Building a History Web Site with Students
  • Religion and Politics in Modern America
  • The Devil's Music: Race, Rock, and Religion in the '50s and '60s
  • The Origins of American Pentecostalism
  • Why Is the American South So Religious? A Historical Look

Alexandra Minna Stern

University of MIchigan

Alexandra Minna Stern is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology, American culture, and history at the University of Michigan. As a historian, her research has focused on the uses and misuses of genetics in the United States and Latin America. She is the author of Eugenic Nation: Faults and Frontiers of Better Breeding in Modern America (2005), which won the American Public Health Association’s Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for outstanding contribution to the history of public health, and Telling Genes: The Story of Genetic Counseling in America (2012).

  • Troubled Relations: Race and Genetics in Modern America
  • Eugenics, Race, and Reproduction in California
  • Genetics and Human Rights in Latin America
  • Telling Genes: Genetic Counseling in Modern America
  • The Legacy of Eugenics in the Era of Human Genomics

Brenda E. Stevenson

University of California, Los Angeles

Brenda E. Stevenson is a professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her areas of interest include African American history centered on slave women and family during the colonial and antebellum eras. She has also written and lectured widely on the southern white family (planters and yeomen); the free black family in the southern and northern United States; the contemporary African American family, particularly in urban settings; and the nature of race riots in the United States. Her books include Life in Black and White: Family and Community in the Slave South (1996), which won an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights; The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimke (1988); The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins: Justice, Gender, and the Origins of the L.A. Riots (2013), which received the OAH James A. Rawley Prize for the best book on race relations in the United States; and the forthcoming "What is Slavery?". She is currently completing a book on slave women in the southern colonial and antebellum United States.

  • Creating an Elite Black Female Intelligentsia: The Case of the Forten Women
  • Images of Diverse Womanhood in Late Twentieth- Century Urban America: The Case of Latasha Harlins, Soon Ja Du, and Joyce Karlin
  • Interracial Sex and Slave Women's Labor in the Old South
  • Slave Women and Religion in the Antebellum South
  • The Slave Female World of Sally Hemings

Michael B. Stoff

University of Texas at Austin

A historian of the modern United States, Michael B. Stoff is the director of the nationally acclaimed Plan II Honors Program at the University of Texas. He is the author of Oil, War, and American Security (1980) and a coauthor of Experience History: Interpreting America’s Past (8th edition, 2014) as well as high school and middle school textbooks. A series coeditor of Oxford New Narratives in American History, he is also a coeditor of The Manhattan Project: A Documentary Introduction to the Atomic Age (1991) and is currently working on a book on the bombing of Nagasaki. He has received numerous teaching awards, including the 2012 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award, the first system-wide teaching award ever offered by the University of Texas Regents.

  • The Wizard of Oz: A Parable of Populism
  • Narrative History: Putting the Story Back into History
  • Picturing Destruction: Yosuke Yamahata in the Atomic Wasteland of Nagasaki
  • Presidential Leadership in Modern America
  • Public Education In America: Where We Have Been and Where We Should Go

Cynthia Stout

Independent historian

Cynthia Stout spent thirty years with the Jeffco Public Schools in Golden, Colorado, teaching history and social studies at the secondary level. Moving from the classroom to the central office, she wrote curriculum and assessments and worked in professional development for K-12 teachers. Since retiring, she has coauthored Teaching Social Studies Today (2007) and has worked with the Library of Congress' Teaching with Primary Sources program through the Metropolitan State University of Denver (as highlighted in "From Corn Chips to Garbology: The Dynamics of Historical Inquiry" in the July 2012 OAH Magazine of History). Most recently, she has honed her ability to use the Right Question Institute's process for teaching teachers how to teach students to ask deep and probing historical questions. Currently she is working as the education editor with Colorado Humanities on the Colorado Encyclopedia, providing resources aligned to Common Core and Colorado state standards for K-12 teachers to be included on the encyclopedia's website.

  • Assessment and Evaluation in the History Classroom
  • Best Practices in Teaching History at the Secondary Level
  • Dual Inquiry Process
  • Effective Use of Primary Sources in the Classroom
  • Teaching Students to Ask Good Questions
  • Teaching Students to Think Historically
  • Tuberculosis and the Development of Colorado

Thomas J. Sugrue

University of Pennsylvania

Thomas J. Sugrue is the David Boies Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author, most recently, of Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race (2010) and Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North (2008), a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in history. His first book, The Origins of the Urban Crisis (1996), won the Bancroft Prize and awards for best book in North American urban history, labor history, and social science history. He is a coeditor of The New Suburban History (2006), with Kevin Kruse, and W. E. B. Du Bois, Race, and the City: The Philadelphia Negro and its Legacy (1998), with Michael B. Katz. Sugrue has given more than three hundred lectures in the United States and overseas in the last fifteen years and has also served as an expert witness in several civil rights cases, including the cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court involving affirmative action at the University of Michigan. He has recently completed, with Glenda Gilmore, a history of the United States in the twentieth century which will published in 2015. Sugrue has been president of the Urban History Association as well as the Social Science History Association.

  • Barack Obama as History
  • Beyond Apocalypse: Rethinking America in the 1960s
  • Jim Crow's Last Stand: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Suburban North
  • Leading a Divided America: Barack Obama and the Age of Fracture
  • Race and Rust: The Transformation of the Postwar American City
  • Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten History of Civil Rights in the North

Patricia Sullivan

University of South Carolina

Patricia Sullivan is a professor of history at the University of South Carolina and codirects an ongoing series of summer institutes at Harvard’s W.E.B. Du Bois Institute on “Teaching the History of the Civil Rights Movement.” Her publications include Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement (2009), Freedom Writer: Virginia Foster Durr, Letters from the Civil Rights Years (2003) and Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era (1996). She is currently writing a book on Robert F. Kennedy, civil rights, and the struggles for racial justice during the 1960s.

  • "Brown is a Black Cultural Product": The Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education
  • "The Best a White America Has to Offer": Robert Kennedy and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the 1960s
  • “Plowing the Ground and Having Faith in the Future”: The Founding Generation of NAACP Women
  • Freedom Writer: Virginia Durr and the Civil Rights Movement
  • What Happened to the Civil Rights Movement?

Jeremi Suri

University of Texas at Austin

Jeremi Suri is the Mack Brown Distinguished Professor for Global Leadership at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2007, Smithsonian Magazine named him one of America’s “Top Young Innovators” in the humanities and sciences. He is the author of Liberty’s Surest Guardian: American Nation-building from the Founders to Obama (2011), American Foreign Relations since 1898 (2010), Henry Kissinger and the American Century (2007), The Global Revolutions of 1968 (2007), and Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Detente (2003). His research emphasizes the interconnections between grassroots politics and elite policy-making. In his teaching and writing, he seeks to internationalize understanding of American history by focusing on the foreign “others” who have contributed to local and national definitions of identity in the United States. He also examines how American citizens—from ordinary men and women through distinguished politicians and businesspeople—have influenced the world outside the United States.

  • Henry Kissinger and the American Century
  • Ideas and Traditions in American Foreign Policy
  • Jews and Society in a Post-Holocaust World
  • Power and Protest in the 1960s
  • The Cold War and its Contemporary Legacies
  • The Past and Future of Nation-Building in the Modern World
  • The United States and the Middle East since the Second World War

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David Thelen

Indiana University

David Thelen is a professor emeritus of history at Indiana University. He served as the editor of the Journal of American History from 1985 to 1999 and he received the a recipient of the OAH Roy Rosenzweig Distinguished Service Award in 2008.

  • Coming to Terms with Evil in the Past
  • How Americans Understand and Use the Past
  • Reliving the Past and Rethinking History: From South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission to U.S. Army Staff Rides and Living History

New in 2013 2014Lorrin Thomas *

Rutgers-Camden

Lorrin Thomas is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University-Camden, where she teaches Latin American and Caribbean history and the comparative history of the Americas. Her research explores ideas about rights and equality in the twentieth-century Americas. Her first book, Puerto Rican Citizen: History and Political Identity in Twentieth-Century New York City (2010), traces the complex meanings of citizenship for colonial migrants in the U.S. metropole. She is currently working on two books: a study of Puerto Rican politics and civil rights in the United States, with Aldo Lauria Santiago, and an examination of the politics of human rights in the Americas in the 1970s.

  • Puerto Rican Citizen
  • The Americas' Last Colony: Puerto Rico and the United States
  • Challenging the Racial Binary: Latinos in the United States
  • The University and the Streets: The Radical Roots of Ethnic Studies Programs
  • When We Talk about Human Rights: Mexico and the Other Americas in the 1970s

William G. Thomas III

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

William G. Thomas is the John and Catherine Angle Professor in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. A former Lincoln Prize Laureate, he served as director and cofounder of the Virginia Center for Digital History and an associate professor of history at the University of Virginia from 1997-2005. His digital research initiatives have included The Valley of the Shadow, Race and Place: African American Community in the Jim Crow South, Television News of the Civil Rights Era, and The Countryside Transformed: The Eastern Shore of Virginia and the Railroad. He is the author of Lawyering for the Railroad: Business, Law, and Power in the New South (1999) and The Iron Way: Railroads, the Civil War, and the Making of Modern America (2012) and a coauthor of The Civil War on the Web (2000). He is also a coauthor, with Edward L. Ayers, of “The Differences Slavery Made” published in 2003 as one of first digital articles of the American Historical Review.

  • 1864: Conquering the Geography of the South
  • Teaching with Technology: From the Survey to the Seminar
  • The Civil War, the Railroads, and the Making of Modern America
  • What is Digital History?

Heather Ann Thompson

University of Michigan

Heather Ann Thompson, who will join the history faculty at the University of Michigan in 2015, has written numerous popular as well as scholarly articles on the history of mass incarceration as well as its current impact. These include pieces for the New York Times, The Atlantic, Salon, Dissent, New Labor Forum, and the Huffington Post, as well as the award-winning historical articles "Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline, and Transformation in Postwar American History" and "Rethinking Working Class Struggle through the Lens of the Carceral State: Toward a Labor History of Inmates and Guards." Thompson recently served on a National Academy of Sciences blue-ribbon panel that studied the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the United States. She is the author of Whose Detroit: Politics, Labor and Race in a Modern American City (2001) and the forthcoming book "Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971." She is also editor of Speaking Out: Protest and Activism in the 1960s and 1970s (2009). Thompson has consulted on several documentary films, including "Criminal Injustice at Attica," and she regularly speaks to radio and print journalists about issues related to policing, civil rights, urban crisis, and prisons.

  • Blood in the Water: The Attica Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy
  • History of the Black Power Movement
  • How Incarceration Distorts Democracy in America
  • Politics, Labor, and the Carceral State
  • Why Mass Incarceration Matters

Barbara L. Tischler

Independent Scholar

Barbara L. Tischler is the author of numerous articles on American culture, the 1960s, and aspects of the anti–Vietnam War movement, along with An American Music (1986) and Sights on the Sixties (1992). She has also taught courses on the U.S. Constitution and U.S. history at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently working on a biography of Muhammad Ali.

  • "Born on the Fourth of July": Musical Celebrations of America's Independence
  • "Singing Well and Shooting Straight": Music in America's Twentieth-Century Wars
  • Beat Prose and the Journey Home: Jack Kerouac's Struggle with the Road
  • Muhammad Ali: Icon of the 1960s
  • Music in the Civil Rights Movement
  • The G.I. Antiwar Movement in Vietnam
  • Women in the Antiwar Movement of the 1960s

Robert Brent Toplin

University of North Carolina at Wilmington

Robert Brent Toplin is the author of several books on history, politics, and film including Radical Conservatism: The Right’s Political Religion (2006), Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11”: How One Film Divided a Nation (2006), Reel History: In Defense of Hollywood (2002), Oliver Stone’s USA: Film, History, and Controversy (2000), and History By Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past (1996, 2010). He has served as the editor of film reviews for the Journal of American History as well as the “Masters of the Movies” series in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History. He has made numerous appearances as a commentator on history and film for cbs, pbs, the History Channel, cspan, the Turner Classic Movies Channel, and National Public Radio, and he has served as a principal creator of historical dramas that appeared nationally on pbs, the Disney Channel, and Starz.

  • History By Hollywood: The Movies’ Influence on Public Opinion
  • Hollywood and Hitler: How Movies, Moviemakers, and Movie Stars Dealt with the Nazis
  • The Great Recession as History: Causes and Controversies
  • Michael Moore's “Fahrenheit 9/11”: How One Film Divided a Nation
  • The Power of Words: The Evolution of Political Messaging from the 1930s to the Present

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Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Harvard University

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich is 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University and a past president of the American Historical Association. A former MacArthur Fellow, she is the author of many articles and books on early American history, including A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard Based on Her Diary, 1785–1812 (1990), which won the Pulitzer Prize. She is also the author of Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History (2007) and is currently studying nineteenth-century Mormon women’s diaries.

  • "A Quilt Unlike Any Other": Rediscovering the Work of Harriett Powers
  • Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History

New in 2013 2014Daniel Usner *

Vanderbilt University

Daniel Usner is the Holland N. McTyeire Professor of History at Vanderbilt University and a past president of the American Society for Ethnohistory. He teaches courses on colonial North America, American Indian history, and Atlantic World empires and borderlands. His research focuses on the American South during the colonial and early national periods and on relations between the United States and Indian nations to the present. Most of his work is influenced by a special interest in the complicated intersections of economic adaptation and cultural representation. Usner is the author of Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in a Frontier Exchange Economy: The Lower Mississippi Valley Before 1783 (1992); American Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley (1998); Indian Work: Language and Livelihood in North American Indian History (2009); and the forthcoming book "Weaving Alliances with Other Women: American Indian Work in the New South." He is currently writing a book entitled "From Bayou Teche to Fifth Avenue: How Chitimacha Indian Baskets Moved across America."

  • D. H. Lawrence in the American Southwest: The English Novelist as Ethnographer and Employer of Pueblo Indians
  • George Washington, the Great Father of American Indian Casinos
  • Playing Indian in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans: The Performance of Indigenous Identity and Sovereignty in Urban America
  • Weaving Alliances with Other Women: Chitimacha Indian Basketry and the Struggle for Recognition in the New South

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Lara Vapnek

St. John's University

Lara Vapnek teaches at St. John's University and specializes in the history of gender and labor in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States. Her book, Breadwinners: Working Women and Economic Independence, 1865-1920 (2009), examines how female wage earners pursued equality by claiming new identities as citizens and as workers. Vapnek is working on two new projects: a short biography of Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890–1964), a labor organizer and free speech advocate; and a study of wet-nursing in New York City from the 1840s through the 1920s.

  • Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Mortal Enemy of Capitalism
  • Breadwinners: Working Women in the Early Struggle for Gender Equality
  • Solving the Servant Problem: Domestic Service and Labor Reform during the Progressive Era
  • Guarding the Girl in the Shop: Gender and Class in the Gilded Age Consumers Movement

Elizabeth R. Varon

University of Virginia

Elizabeth R. Varon is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. She is author of We Mean to be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia (1998) and Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy (2003). The latter book - which won awards from the Virginia Historical Society; the James River Writers Festival and the Library of Virginia; and the Southern Regional Council - reflects Varon’s ongoing commitment to integrating social history with political and military history. Her most recent book is Disunion! The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789-1859 (2008), the first volume of the Littlefield History of the Civil War Era. The book explores how Americans, as far back as the earliest days of the Republic, agonized and strategized over disunion.

  • Imagining a Winnable War: Abraham Lincoln and the Rhetoric of Disunion
  • The Method in Her Madness: Recovering the True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in Confederate Richmond
  • The Slaveholders' Dilemma: Disunion Rhetoric and the Coming of the Civil War

Penny M. Von Eschen

University of Michigan

Penny M. Von Eschen is professor of history and American culture at the University of Michigan. She is author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War (2004) and Race against Empire: Black Americans and Anticolonialism, 1937-1957 (1997), winner of the Stuart L. Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, among others. She is coeditor of Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race, and Power in American History (2007) and American Studies: An Anthology (2008), and is currently working on a transnational history of Cold War nostalgia.

  • Cold War Nostalgia: From "Stalin World Theme Park", Lithuania, to the International Spy Museum, Washington, D.C.
  • Duke Ellington Plays Baghdad: Rethinking Power after 1945
  • Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War: The U.S. State Department Jazz Tours
  • Rebooting the Cold War: Nostalgia and Global Disorder Since 1989

Michael Vorenberg

Brown University

Michael Vorenberg, an associate professor of history at Brown University, teaches courses on American legal history and the Civil War and Reconstruction. His first book, Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment (2001), was a finalist for the Lincoln Prize. He is also the author of The Emancipation Proclamation: A Brief History with Documents (2009). He is working on a book about the impact of the Civil War on American nationalism and citizenship, and he speaks widely on such topics as constitutional history, Abraham Lincoln, and Civil War emancipation.

  • Abraham Lincoln and the Meaning of American Citizenship
  • Slavery, Freedom, and the American Constitution
  • The Civil War and the Creation of Modern America

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J. Samuel Walker

Independent historian

Former historian of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, J. Samuel Walker is the author of five books on the history of nuclear power regulation, including Three Mile Island (2004) and The Road to Yucca Mountain (2009), which received the OAH Richard W. Leopold Prize. He is also the author of Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan (revised edition, 2004), and ACC Basketball: The Story of the Rivalries, Traditions, and Scandals of the First Two Decades of the Atlantic Coast Conference (2011). He has appeared on network and cable television programs about the atomic bomb, Three Mile Island, and the history of college basketball.

  • A Rewarding Career as a Professional Historian in a Non-academic Setting
  • Balancing Academics and Intercollegiate Athletics: The Case of the Atlantic Coast Conference
  • The Three Mile Island Accident and Nuclear Power in the United States
  • Truman and the Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb

Mike Wallace

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York

Mike Wallace is Distinguished Professor of History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. He is author, most recently, of A New Deal for New York (2002) and coauthor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 (2000). He is also director of the Gotham Center for New York City History at the CUNY Graduate School. He is now working on the second volume of Gotham which will carry the story through the twentieth century. Founder, copublisher, and coeditor of the Radical History Review, Wallace has also served as consultant for Ric Burns’s documentary on New York.

  • History of New York City
  • The Future of New York City

Brian Ward

Northumbria University

Brian Ward teaches southern, African American, and cultural history at the Northumbria University. His publications include The 1960s: A Documentary Reader (2009); Radio and the Struggle for Civil Rights in the South (2004), which was selected by the American Library Association as a Choice outstanding academic title and won the best history book award from the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication; and Just My Soul Responding: Rhythm and Blues, Black Consciousness, and Race Relations (1998), which won the OAH James A. Rawley Prize and an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. He is currently working on two books: one about artists and repertoire men in the early U.S. recording industry, the other about connections between British popular music and the American South.

  • "Dixie . . . Practically a Suburb of London": The Imagined South in Interwar Britain
  • Bigger than Elvis and More Popular Than Jesus: The Beatles and the American South
  • Delius, Davidson, and the Drive-by Truckers: The History of Three Southern Operas
  • Radio and the Civil Rights Movement
  • The "Indefinable" Florence Mills: Why Nobody Remembers the Biggest African American Star of the 1920s?

Susan Ware

American National Biography

Susan Ware is currently the general editor of the American National Biography. From 1997–2005 she served as the editor of volume five of the biographical dictionary Notable American Women at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University. Her research interests include twentieth-century American history and the history of American women, as well as biography. She has published books on women in the New Deal and the 1930s; biographies of Molly Dewson, Amelia Earhart, Mary Margaret McBride, and Billie Jean King; and a women’s history anthology.

  • A Sporting Chance: Title IX and Women's History
  • Amelia Earhart and the Search for Modern Feminism
  • Mary Margaret McBride and the History of Talk Radio

Harry L. Watson

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A native of Greensboro, North Carolina, Harry L. Watson is the Atlanta Distinguished Professor in Southern Culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 1976. His writes and teaches on the antebellum South, the early American republic, and the state of North Carolina. Watson has written four books, including Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America (1990, revised edition 2006) and Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay: Democracy and Development in Antebellum America (1997), and has coedited three collections of essays. He directed the university’s Center for the Study of the American South from 1999 to 2012 and coedits its quarterly journal, Southern Cultures. He has also been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center and has served as the president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.

  • 1812: A Three-Cornered Fight for the West
  • Liberty, Slavery, and the Coming of the Civil War
  • Majority Rule, Equal Rights, and Limited Government: The Complex Legacy of Andrew Jackson

New in 2013 2014Marsha Weisiger *

University of Oregon

The Julie and Rocky Dixon Chair of U.S. Western History and an associate professor of history and environmental studies at the University of Oregon, Marsha Weisiger specializes in the environmental history of the American West. Her research and teaching also encompass Native Americans, gender, social and labor history, and public history. Her book Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country (2009) won four awards, including the Western History Association's Hal Rothman Book Award and the the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association's Carol and Norris Hundley Award. She is also the author of Land of Plenty: Oklahomans in the Cotton Fields of Arizona, 1933-1942 (1995). She is currently working on two related books, one on the meaning of wildness along western rivers and the other on the ways that explorers, scientists, and recreationists narrated their adventures down the Colorado River. Additionally, she is researching the history of the intersections between the countercultural and environmental movements.

  • Narrating Adventure down the Colorado River
  • Navajos, New Dealers, and the Metaphysics of Nature
  • Taking Native American Historical Truths Seriously
  • The Gendered Nature of Environmental History
  • The Counterculture and the Environmental Movement
  • Did Steinbeck Get It Right? The True Tale of the Joads

Elliott West

University of Arkansas

Elliott West, Alumni Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Arkansas, is a specialist in the social and environmental history of the American West. He has twice been chosen as his university’s teacher of the year and, in 2009, he was one of three finalists for the Robert Foster Cherry Prize for the outstanding classroom teacher in the nation. He has written several books, including The Way to the West: Essays on the Central Plains (1995); The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers and the Rush to Colorado (1998), winner of the Francis Parkman Prize and the OAH Ray Allen Billington Prize; and, most recently, The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story (2009).

  • A War of Dreams: Indians, Whites and the Struggle for the Great Plains
  • Bison R Us: The Buffalo as American Icon
  • Growing Up Western: Childhood on the Frontier
  • Selling the Dream: The West in Advertising
  • The Great Plains: America's Meeting Ground
  • The West Before Lewis and Clark: Three Lives

W. Richard West Jr.

Autry National Center of the American West

W. Richard West Jr. is the president and chief executive officer of the Autry National Center of the American West. He is also the founding director and director emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian and the former interim director of the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C. A former editor and note editor of the Stanford Law Review, he practiced law for seventeen years and has served as general counsel and special counsel to numerous American Indian tribes, communities, and organizations, representing clients before federal, state and tribal courts, various executive departments of the federal government, and the Congress. A former chair of the board of the American Association of Museums and a former vice president of the International Council of Museums, West currently serves on numerous boards including the Kaiser Family Foundation, International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, and the Center for Native American Youth.


New in 2013 2014Laura Wexler *

Yale University

Laura Wexler is a professor of American studies and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Yale University. The founder and director of Yale's Photographic Memory Workshop, she is also affiliated with the university's film studies program, its program in ethnicity, race, and migration, and its public humanities program. A former principal investigator of Yale's Women, Religion, and Globalization Project, she is currently a fellow of the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference at Columbia University and the principal investigator of the Photogrammar Project, constructing a mobile, interactive geospatial digital map of the more than 170,000 photographs in the Farm Security Administration–Office of War Information Archive held at the Library of Congress. She is also a member of FemTechNet and of the steering committee for the Distributive Open Collaborative Course initiative. Her scholarship centers upon intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class within the visual culture of the United States, from the nineteenth century to the present. She is the author of Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U. S. Imperialism (2000), which won the American Historical Association's Joan Kelley Memorial Prize; a coauthor, with photographer Sandra Matthews, of Pregnant Pictures (2000); and a coeditor of Interpretation and the Holocaust, a special issue of the Yale Journal of Criticism (spring 2001). Her most recent article is "A More Perfect Likeness: Frederick Douglass, Photography, and the Image of the Nation," Yale Review (October 2011). She is currently researching family photograph albums in post-conflict societies.

  • Ways of Seeing Seeing: Visual Culture Studies at the Digital Turn
  • A More Perfect Image: Frederick Douglass, Photography, and the Nation's Future
  • The Moon and Moonshine: Nineteenth-Century Photographs of the Invisible World
  • Families and Photographs: Seeing (un)like a State
  • The Tenderness of Men in Suburbs: My Photographs in Boston in 1968

Carmen Teresa Whalen

Williams College

Carmen Teresa Whalen is a professor of Latina/o studies and U.S. history at Williams College, where she also currently serves as the Associate Dean for Institutional Diversity. Her research and teaching interests include Puerto Rican migration, particularly as it intersects with women’s and working-class history, as well as Latina/o migration more broadly and comparatively. Her first book, From Puerto Rico to Philadelphia: Puerto Rican Workers and Postwar Economies (2001), explores the causes and dynamics of gendered labor migrations in an increasingly global economy. Her coedited book, Puerto Rican Diaspora: Historical Perspectives (2005), includes essays on several Puerto Rican communities and points towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the histories of Puerto Ricans in the United States.

  • New Directions in Latina/o Studies
  • Puerto Rican Women, the Garment Industry, and the Garment Workers Unions
  • The Puerto Rican Diaspora: Past and Present

Jeannie Whayne

University of Arkansas

Jeannie Whayne is a professor of history at the University of Arkansas, codirector of the university's Teaching and Faculty Support Center, and president of the Agricultural History Society. She is the author of two books including Delta Empire: Lee Wilson and the Transformation of Agriculture in the New South (2011), a social, economic, and environmental study of a plantation owned by a single family from 1846 to 2010 and the winner of the John G. Ragsdale Prize. The editor or coauthor of nine books, she is most recently a coeditor of The Ongoing Burden of Southern History: Politics and Identity in the Twenty-First-Century South (2012). She has won numerous awards for her teaching and publications, including the Arkansas Historical Association's Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to the study of Arkansas history. She is currently researching a book on Memphis, Tennessee, that examines the interaction between the city and its hinterlands in forging a regional cotton empire; she is also working on a National Endowment for the Humanities digitization proposal to map that connection. Her presidential address for the Agricultural History Society and a paper for the World Congress on Environmental History, both to be delivered in summer 2014, examine modern "portfolio plantations," or investor-owned agricultural land, placing this global development in context of the new corporate colonialism and examining its environmental and cultural implications.

  • A Faustian Bargain? The Modern Corporate Plantation in the Age of Scientific Agriculture
  • Building it of Brick and Hollow Tile: Lee Wilson, the Lowery Lynching, and the Limitations of Planter Paternalism in the Twentieth-Century South
  • Crises in Cotton's Metropolis: Race, Ethnicity, and Yellow Fever in Late Nineteenth-Century Memphis, Tennessee
  • The Winds have Changed: The Flood of 1927 and the Arkansas "Cracker" Response to Planter Power

Deborah Gray White

Rutgers University

Deborah Gray White is the Board of Governors Professor of History and Women and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. Most recently, she is a coauthor, with Mia Bay and Waldo E. Martin, of Freedom on My Mind: A History of African Americans, With Documents (2012). She is also the author of Ar’n’t I A Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South (1985 and 1999), the first gendered analysis of the institution of slavery; Two Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894-1994 (1999); and Let My People Go: African Americans, 1804-1860 (1996); and the editor of Telling Histories: Black Women in the Ivory Tower (2008), a collection of personal narratives written by African American women historians that chronicle the entry of black women into the historical profession and the development of the field of black women’s history. A codirector of “Narratives of Power: New Articulations of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Class,” a two-year seminar and conference project with the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, she is currently writing “Can’t We All Just Get Along? American Identity at the Turn of the Millennium.”

  • Brown Sugar Melts: African American Women at the Turn of the Millennium
  • Lost in the U.S.A.: The 1990s Marches as a Referendum on America
  • Post-Black or Post-Modern Blackness: Being Black in America Today
  • The Hand That Rocks the Cradle: The Million Mom March for Gun Control
  • What Women Want: A Comparison of the Way Black and White Women Approach Postmodern America

Shane White

University of Sydney

Shane White has been at the University of Sydney since he was seventeen years old. Currently professorial fellow and professor of American history there, he studies African American history—particularly the lives and experiences of ordinary African Americans—and often concentrates on black street life. He is a coauthor of Playing the Numbers: Gambling in Harlem between the Wars (2010) and The Sounds of Slavery: Discovering African American History Through Songs, Sermons, and Speech (2005), and is currently working on a collaborative project, “Year of the Riot,” about Harlem in 1935.

  • Sounds of Slavery
  • Staging Freedom in Black New York
  • The Black Eagle of Harlem: Herbert Julian
  • The Prince of Darkness: Wall Street's First Black Millionaire
  • When Black Kings and Queens Ruled in Harlem

Jon Wiener

University of California, Irvine

Jon Wiener is a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, where he has taught for more than 25 years. A specialist in twentieth-century U.S. history, he is also a contributing editor of The Nation magazine, for which he has written more than 250 articles, primarily on politics and political history. In his most recent book, How We Forgot the Cold War: A Historical Journey across America (2012), he visits museums, monuments, and memorials to the Cold War to try to understand why it is being forgotten.

  • How We Forgot the Cold War: A Historical Journey across America

New in 2013 2014Craig Steven Wilder *

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Craig Steven Wilder studies American urban, intellectual, and cultural history. His most recent book is Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities (2013). He is also the author of In the Company of Black Men: The African Influence on African American Culture in New York City (2001) and A Covenant with Color: Race and Social Power in Brooklyn (2000). A professor of history at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and a recipient of the Columbia University Medal of Excellence, he serves as a senior fellow in the Bard Prison Initiative which provides higher education and opportunity to incarcerated men and women, and he has advised numerous public history projects, including historical documentaries and museum exhibits.

  • The Matriculating Indian and the Uneducable Negro: Race and Education in the Atlantic World
  • The War on Campus: Colleges and Slavery during the American Revolution

Chad Williams

Brandeis University

Chad Williams is an associate professor of African and Afro-American studies at Brandeis University. His teaching and research focus on World War I, African Americans in the military, and African American intellectual history. His first book, Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era (2010), won the OAH Liberty Legacy Foundation Award and the Society for Military History’s Distinguished Book Award, and was named an outstanding academic title by Choice magazine. He is currently completing a study on W. E. B. Du Bois and World War I.

  • African American Veterans and the Struggle for Civil Rights
  • Black Soldiers and Racial Leadership in American History
  • Rethinking African American Military History
  • Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers and World War I
  • W. E. B. Du Bois and the Meaning of World War I

Frank J. Williams

Supreme Court of Rhode Island

Chief Justice (Ret.) of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island, Frank J. Williams is the author of Judging Lincoln (2002) and Lincoln as Hero (2012), a coauthor of The Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views (2008), and a coeditor of The Mary Lincoln Enigma (2013), among other works. He has amassed a private library and archive that ranks among the nation’s largest and finest Lincoln collections. Founding chair of the Lincoln Forum and past president of the Abraham Lincoln Association, he serves as literary editor of the Lincoln Herald, where his quarterly “Lincolniana” survey appears, and is currently at work on an annotated bibliography of Lincoln titles published since 1865.

  • Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties in Wartime
  • Abraham Lincoln and Leadership
  • Abraham Lincoln as a Lawyer
  • Abraham Lincoln at 200
  • Abraham Lincoln, Evolving Commander-in-Chief
  • Judging Abraham Lincoln as a Judge
  • Lincoln's Reelection Almost Derailed by Peace Talks

New in 2013 2014Heather Andrea Williams *

University of Pennsylvania

Trained as a lawyer as well as a historian, Heather Andrea Williams is a Presidential Professor and professor of Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book, Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom (2005), received several book awards, including the Lillian Smith Book Prize. In her second book, Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery (2012), Williams explores forced family separations during slavery and African Americans' efforts to reunify families after the Civil War. She is also the author of the forthcoming book, "A Very Short Introduction to American Slavery." With the support of a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, she is currently directing "Jamaican Journeys," a film project that examines the experiences of Jamaican immigrants to the United States in the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Grief and Loss among Enslaved African American Children
  • Forced Separation of Husbands and Wives during Slavery
  • Searching for Family after the American Civil War
  • Loss, Persistence, and Hope among Enslaved African American Women
  • Liberatory Potential in African American Education
  • Teaching as a Political Act: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom

Rhonda Y. Williams

Case Western Reserve University

Rhonda Y. Williams is an associate professor of history as well as the founding director of the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University, where she also initiated and directs the postdoctoral fellowship in African American studies. She is the author of the award-winning The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women’s Struggles against Urban Inequality (2004) and a coeditor of two volumes, Women, Transnationalism, and Human Rights, a special issue of the Radical History Review (Spring 2008), and Teaching the American Civil Rights Movement: Freedom’s Bittersweet Song (2002). She is working on two book-length projects, “Rethinking the Black Power Movement” and “The Dope Wars: Street-level Hustling and the Culture of Drugs in Post-1940s Urban America.”

  • Democracy and Urban History from the Margins
  • From the Politics of Public Housing to the Politics of Drugs
  • Low-Income Black Women's Struggles for Justice
  • Rethinking Black Power and Black Politics
  • Voices from the Grassroots: Life Narratives, Performance, and Pedagogy

Michael Willrich

Brandeis University

Michael Willrich is the Leff Families Professor of History at Brandeis University. His first book, City of Courts: Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago (2003), won the American Historical Association's John H. Dunning Prize and the American Society for Legal History's Cromwell Book Prize. Most recently, he is the author of Pox: An American History (2011) which tells the story of the great wave of smallpox epidemics that struck the United States around the turn of the twentieth century, spurring the growth of modern public health authority and engendering widespread opposition to the government policy of compulsory vaccination. This book won the OAH Lawrence W. Levine Prize Award and the American Association for the History of Medicine's William H. Welch Medal.

  • Pox Populi: The Epidemic That Changed American Law

Francille Rusan Wilson

University of Southern California

Francille Rusan Wilson is an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity and history at the University of Southern California. She is an intellectual and labor historian whose current research examines the intersections between black labor movements, black social scientists, and black women’s history during the Jim Crow era. Her book, The Segregated Scholars: Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890–1950 (2006) details the world and works of fifteen pioneering scholar-activists over three generations. Her current studies of the lawyer and economist Sadie T. M. Alexander investigate the impact of racism and sexism on black professional women in the early twentieth century as well as media representations of black working women. Wilson serves on the Los Angeles Commission on the Status of Women as well as on the state board of the California African American Museum.

  • "But Some of Us Are Brave": Coloring Women's History and Engendering African American Studies
  • "No Crystal Stair": Three Centuries of Black Women's Work in America, 1619-1999
  • Carter G. Woodson's Great Cause: The History of the Black History Movement
  • First Ladies of Colored America: Popular Representations of Race Women, 1920-1950
  • The Segregated Scholars: Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890-1950

Sam Wineburg

Stanford University

Trained as cognitive psychologist, Sam Wineburg is the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education and a professor of history, by courtesy, at Stanford University, where he directs the doctoral program in history education as part of the Stanford History Education Group. His Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past (2001) won the Association of American Colleges and Universities' Frederic W. Ness Book Award for the work that "best illuminates the goals and practices of a contemporary liberal education." He has also received, with his collaborators, the James Harvey Robinson Prize and the William Gilbert Award from the American Historical Association. Prior to moving to Stanford, he spent 13 years at the University of Washington, where he was a professor of cognitive studies in education, an adjunct professor of history, and a recipient of the university's Distinguished Teaching Award.

  • A History with No Hands: Howard Zinn's People's History of the United States
  • Assessing Historical Understanding
  • Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts
  • The Three Meanings of History

Kenneth J. Winkle

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Kenneth J. Winkle, the Sorensen Professor of American History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an award-winning Lincoln biographer and Civil War historian. Codirector of the Civil War Washington digital project, he is the author most recently of Lincoln’s Citadel: The Civil War in Washington, D.C. (2013). His books also include The Young Eagle: The Rise of Abraham Lincoln (2001); The Oxford Atlas of the Civil War (2004), with Steven Woodworth; and Abraham and Mary Lincoln (2011).

  • "Liberty to the Captive": Fugitive Slaves in Civil-War Washington, D.C.
  • "Bring Forward the Men": The District of Columbia's 1st Regiment United States Colored Troops
  • "Defend What Is Our Own": Arlington Freedman's Village
  • "The Best Place to Try the Experiment": Emancipation in Washington, D.C., April 1862

Allan M. Winkler

Miami University

Allan Winkler is University Distinguished Professor of History at Miami University in Ohio. He is the author of The Politics of Propaganda: The Office of War Information, 1942-1945 (1978); Home Front, U.S.A.: America During World War II (1986); Life Under a Cloud: American Anxiety About the Atom (1993); and Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Making of Modern America (2006). His most recent book is "To Everything There Is a Season": Pete Seeger and the Power of Song (2009).

  • "To Everything There Is a Season": Pete Seeger and the Power of Song
  • Recent American History through Folk Song
  • The Atom and American Life
  • The Lasting Legacy of FDR
  • The World War II Homefront

Barbara Winslow

Brooklyn College, City University of New York

A professor at Brooklyn College who teaches in the women’s studies program and School of Education, Barbara Winslow is a historian of women’s activism as well as the founder and director of the Shirley Chisholm Project. She is the author of Shirley Chisholm: Catalyst for Change (2013) and a coeditor of Clio in the Classroom: A Guide for Teaching U.S. Women’s History (2009).

  • Ecstatic Utopians: The Radical Women's Liberation Movement, 1960-1980
  • How Can I Possibly Teach About Harriet Tubman When I Have to Get to World War I by January 10: Integrating Class, Race, and Gender into the Social Studies Curriculum in the Age of High-Stakes Testing
  • Shirley Chisholm: An Unbought and Unbossed Catalyst for Change
  • Shirley Chisholm: Urban Liberalism, Feminism, and Black Liberation
  • The Impact of the Women's Movement on Athletes and Athletics
  • The Women's Suffrage Movement at Home and Abroad

John Fabian Witt

Yale University

John Fabian Witt is the Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law at Yale Law School. His most recent book, Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History (2012), won the Bancroft Prize and was a New York Times notable book of the year. He is also the author of Patriots and Cosmopolitans: Hidden Histories of American Law (2007), the prizewinning The Accidental Republic: Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows, and the Remaking of American Law (2004), and numerous scholarly articles, and has written for the New York Times, Slate, and the Washington Post.

  • Lincoln in Afghanistan: How the Emancipation Proclamation Created the Modern Laws of War

Victoria W. Wolcott

University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Victoria W. Wolcott is a professor of history at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, where she teaches urban, African American, and women’s history. She is the author of Remaking Respectability: African American Women in Interwar Detroit (2001) and Race, Riots, and Roller Coasters: The Struggle over Segregated Recreation in America (2012). Her current research focuses on the emergence of experimental interracial communities in mid-twentieth-century America. She is also researching the use of hunger strikes as a tactic of resistance.

  • "Strong People Don't Need Strong Leaders": Participatory Democracy and Leadership in the Civil Rights Era
  • Dangerous Play: Racial Conflict in Twentieth-Century Urban Amusements
  • Interracial Utopias in Midcentury America
  • Radical Pacifism and the Long Civil Rights Movement
  • The Resistant Body: Hunger Strikes and Radical Nonviolence in the Twentieth Century
  • The Rise and Fall of Urban Recreation

Nan Elizabeth Woodruff

Penn State University

Nan Elizabeth Woodruff is a professor of African American studies and modern U.S. history at Penn State University. A specialist in twentieth-century African American and southern history, she is the author of American Congo: The African American Freedom Struggle in the Delta (2003, paperback edition 2012), winner of the McClemore Prize. She is currently working on a book project entitled "The Legacies of Everyday Struggle: Memory and Trauma in Grenada and Tallahatchie County, Mississippi in the Post-Civil Rights Era." She has worked extensively with public school teachers.

  • The Legacies of Everyday Struggle: Memory and Trauma in Grenada, Mississippi, in the Post-Civil Rights Era
  • The New Negro in the American Congo:The Elaine, Arkansas, Racial Massacre, 1919

Steven E. Woodworth

Texas Christian University

Steven E. Woodworth is the author, coauthor, or editor of twenty-eight books on the Civil War era. These include Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West (1990), Davis and Lee at War (1995), Six Armies in Tennessee: The Chickamauga and Chattanooga Campaigns (1998), and While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers (2001). Among his more recent books are a biography of William T. Sherman; Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee, 1861-1865 (2005), a history of the Union’s Army of the Tennessee; and Manifest Destinies: Westward Expansion and the Civil War (2010), an examination of how territorial expansion during the 1840s contributed to the political crisis that led to the Civil War. He is currently working on a short book on command in the Battle of Shiloh and a longer work tracing the careers of two companies—Company E of the 44th New York and Company I of the 5th Texas—and their respective hometowns—Albany, New York, and Independence, Texas—from the years leading to the Civil War until the two companies met each other on the battlefield of Gettysburg. Woodworth teaches history at Texas Christian University.

  • "Grant Is My Man": Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War in 1863
  • Decision in the Heartland: Where the Civil War Was Won
  • John Brown, Harpers Ferry, and the Coming of the Civil War
  • Lessons in Leadership from Jefferson Davis and His Generals
  • The Leadership of Robert E. Lee
  • The Leadership of William T. Sherman
  • The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers
  • The Shiloh Campaign

David M. Wrobel

University of Oklahoma

David M. Wrobel is a historian of American thought and culture and the American West. He holds the Merrick Chair in Western History at the University of Oklahoma and is also engaged in a wide range of partnerships with K-12 educators. He is the author of Global West, American Frontier: Travel, Empire, and Exceptionalism, from Manifest Destiny to the Great Depression (2013), Promised Lands: Promotion, Memory, and the Creation of the American West (2002), and The End of American Exceptionalism: Frontier Anxiety from the Old West to the New Deal (1993). He is currently working on two books, "The West and America, 1900–2000: A Regional History" and "John Steinbeck's America: From the Great Depression to the Vietnam War." He is a past president of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association as well as of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honor society.

  • John Steinbeck's America: A Cultural History of the Great Depression and World War II
  • Global West, American Frontier: Travelers' Accounts of the Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American West
  • Historiography as Pedagogy: Thoughts on the Messy Past and Why We Shouldn't Clean It Up
  • The West and America, 1900–2000
  • Causation: The Teacher's and Student's Nightmare
  • The Ghosts of Western Future and Past: Promotion, Memory, and the Creation of the American West from the Homestead Act to the Present
  • A World of Clashing Darwinisms: Conservatism and Liberalism in Late Nineteenth-Century America and Today
  • A Lesson from the Past: How K-12 and University Teachers Can Together Save History Education

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

Ohio State University

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is a professor of history and women's, gender, and sexuality studies at Ohio State University and specializes in Asian American, immigration, and women's histories. She also coedits Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies. She is the author of Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity (2005), a biography of the first American-born Chinese woman physician. Her second book, Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era (2013), examines the international travels of American antiwar activists during the U.S. War in Viet Nam and the political inspiration that decolonizing Asia offered to American radicals. She is currently writing a political biography of Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color in Congress and a coauthor of Title IX.

  • Patsy Takemoto Mink and Antinuclear Activism: Cold War Militarism, Asian American Civic Inclusion, and Pacific Islander Sovereignty
  • A Vietnamese African American: Robert S. Browne and the Antiwar Movement
  • Nurturing America’s Children: Patsy Takemoto Mink and the Politics of Comprehensive Childhood Development
  • Eldridge Cleaver Goes to Pyongyang, Hanoi, and Peking: Third World Internationalism and American Orientalism
  • From White Woman's Burden to Orientalized Motherhood: The Strange Career of Dr. "Mom" Chung
  • Immigration and Illegality in the American Imagination
  • Modernizing Chinatown: Race, Heteronormativity, and Medical Tourism
  • Was Mom Chung a "Sister Lesbian"? Asian American Gender Experimentation and Interracial Homoeroticism
  • Women's Internationalism and Radical Orientalism: The Indochinese Women's Conferences of 1971

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Alice Yang

University of California, Santa Cruz

Alice Yang is provost of Adlai E. Stevenson College and an associate professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she also codirects the Center for the Study of Pacific War Memories. Her publications include Historical Memories of the Japanese American Internment and the Struggle for Redress (2007), Major Problems in Asian American History (2003), and What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (2000). Winner of the university’s Excellence in Teaching Award, she teaches courses on historical memory, World War II, Asian American history, race, gender, oral history, and twentieth-century America. She is currently researching transnational memories of World War II in the Pacific.

  • Historical Memories of Japanese American Internment
  • Historical Memories of World War II in the U.S. and Japan
  • Japanese American Redress and the Passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988
  • Racial Profiling, Wartime Hysteria, and Lessons from World War II

New in 2013 2014Kariann Akemi Yokota *

University of Colorado, Denver

Kariann Akemi Yokota is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado Denver; prior to that, she was an assistant professor of American studies and history at Yale University. Her research interests include transnational relations in the era of the American Revolution, interethnic relations in the twentieth century, and material and visual culture. She is the author of Unbecoming British: How Revolutionary America Became a Postcolonial Nation (2011), which was selected as a Choice outstanding academic title, and a contributor to Globalizing American Studies (2010). Her forthcoming book is entitled "Pacific Overtures: Early America and the Transpacific World, 1760-1853."

  • Pacific Overtures: A View of Early American History from the Transpacific Borderlands
  • Material Culture and the Making and Unmaking of Identity from George Washington to V.S. Naipaul
  • Considering Transoceanic Connections: Atlantic and Pacific Networks in Early American History
  • From Little Tokyo to Bronzeville and Back: Interethnic Relations in Post–World War II America
  • Unbecoming British in the Postrevolutionary Era: Why the Founding Generation Needed Europe

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Rosemarie Zagarri

George Mason University

University Professor and professor of history at George Mason University, Rosemarie Zagarri is the author of Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic (2007), The Politics of Size: Representation in the United States, 1776-1850 (1987), and A Woman's Dilemma: Mercy Otis Warren and the American Revolution (1995), and the editor of David Humphreys' "Life of General Washington" with George Washington's "Remarks" (1991). A past president of Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, she has also served as a member of the Council of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. She has appeared as an on-camera historian on C-SPAN's "Morning Journal," pbs's "George Washington: The Man Who Wouldn't Be King," and the Fairfax Television Network's "The Real Martha Washington." She is currently working on a book entitled "Nabob on the Potomac: Thomas Law, British India, and the Early American Republic."

  • Founding Mothers: How Women Shaped the American Revolution
  • The American Revolution in a Global Context
  • Women and the Constitution before Seneca Falls

Julian E. Zelizer

Princeton University

Julian E. Zelizer is a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of Taxing America: Wilbur D. Mills, Congress, and the State, 1945–1975 (1998), winner of the OAH Ellis Hawley Prize and the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation’s D.B. Hardeman Prize; On Capitol Hill: The Struggle to Reform Congress and its Consequences, 1948–2000 (2004); Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security from World War II to the War on Terrorism (2009); Jimmy Carter (2010), named as one of the best presidential biographies by the Washington Post; and Governing America: The Revival of Political History (2012). He is a coauthor of Conservatives in Power: The Reagan Years, 1981–1989 (2010). He is the editor, most recently, of What’s Good for Business: Business and American Politics Since World War II (2012) and The Presidency of George W. Bush: A First Historical Assessment (2010), named a Choice editors’ pick, and a coeditor, with Bruce Schulman, of The Constitution and Public Policy in U.S. History (2009) and Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s (2008). He is also a well-known commentator in the international and national media on political history and contemporary politics, and a regular contributor to CNN.Com, The Huffington Post, and Politico, among others. Named by History News Network as one of the top young historians in the country, Zelizer is currently writing a book on the Great Society and another on America since the 1970s.

  • Beyond the Jewish Lobby: American Jews and American Politics after the 1960s
  • How Did We Get into this Mess? The Roots of Political Polarization
  • How Politics Got America Deeper into Vietnam
  • How the Great Society Transformed American Politics
  • Lyndon Johnson, Barack Obama, and the Limits of Presidential Leadership
  • The Legislative President: Lyndon Johnson
  • When A Maverick Came to Washington: The Presidency of Jimmy Carter

Jonathan Zimmerman

New York University

Jonathan Zimmerman is the director of the history of education program at the Steinhardt School of Education and a professor of history in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at New York University. A former Peace Corps volunteer and high school teacher, he is the author of Small Wonder: The Little Red Schoolhouse in History and Memory (2009 ), Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the American Century (2006), Whose America? Culture Wars in the Public Schools (2002) and Distilling Democracy: Alcohol Education in America’s Public Schools, 1880-1925 (1999). He won New York University’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 2008. He is also a frequent op-ed contributor to the New York Times, the Washington Post, the New Republic, and other newspapers and magazines.

  • Across the Great Divide: American Historians and their Publics
  • Dueling Dilemmas: Race and Religion in American Public Schools
  • I before E? The Failed Campaign to Simplify American Spelling, 1890-1940
  • Is Progressive Education "Culturally Appropriate"? The Case of Ghana in the 1960s
  • Readin', Writin', and Religion: Faith and Public Education in the United States
  • Sex, Drugs, and Right 'n' Wrong: Teaching about Sin in American Public Schools
  • States of Desire: How Sex Education Encircled the Globe
  • The Little Red Schoolhouse: An American Icon
  • The Muzzled Teacher: American Public Schools and the Limits of Freedom
  • We Are All Pluralists Now: The Rise of Multiculturalism in the Twentieth Century

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