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Meetings & Events


Schedule at a Glance

 

Friday, July 17

 

Saturday, July 18

Sunday, July 19

1:30 pm

Registration Open
Coffee Available

 7:30 am

Breakfast & Registration

Breakfast & Registration

2:30 pm

Plenary Roundtable: Researching and Preserving African American History in the American West

 8:30 am

Paper Session: Cultural and Racial Boundaries for Immigrants in the West
OR
Workshop: A Quest for Freedom: The African American Experience in the U.S. West
OR
Paper Session: Freedom, Violence, and Conservatism in the West: Three Community Studies

Paper Session: Public History, Historic Preservation, and Diversity in the West
OR
Workshop: Ventura College History & Pre-Law Association's Oral History Project

4:00 pm

Hosted Reception Sponsored by Glendale CC Social Sciences Division and OAH

 10:00 am

Break

Break

 

 10:30 am

Plenary Roundtable: Asian American and Pacific Islander History

Paper Session: Paths to Understanding the Native American Experience in the West
OR
Paper Session: We Remember Them: The Isla Vista Tragedy

 

 12:00 pm

Lunch

Adjourn/Tours

 

 1:30 pm

Plenary Session:
White Wash Documentary Film Screening and Discussion: Race, Surfing and the Romanticized Beach Culture of Southern California
OR
Tours


Friday, July 17
2:30 pm to 4:00 pm 

Roundtable: Researching and Preserving African American History in the American West
Chair and Panelist: Stacey Smith, Oregon State University
Panelists:
Susan Anderson, Independent Scholar
Patty Colman, Moorpark College
Daniel Lynch, UCLA
Kevin Waite, University of Pennsylvania

Session abstract:
This roundtable will explore a series of methodological problems in researching and writing about the history of African Americans in the U.S. West. African American history can be difficult to uncover in western North America. A scarcity of archival resources, combined with the common assumption that African Americans did not play an important part in the region's history until WWII, pose major challenges to scholars seeking to recover the black experience in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In the past two decades, however, a wealth of scholarship on the black West has raised new questions about the role of African Americans in westward migration and has charted new avenues of archival research.
The scholars on the roundtable will speak to these emerging trends in African American history by drawing on their wide-ranging expertise as researchers, writers, and curators of the black experience in the West. Each panelist will comment on a particular research problem rooted in his or her individual scholarship. Stacey Smith will both chair the panel and participate as a panelist.


Saturday, July 18

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Paper Session: Cultural and Racial Boundaries for Immigrants in the American West
Chair: Christina Gold, El Camino College
Papers:

  • "Armenians in California and the Pacific Northwest from 1880-1924," 
  • Earlene Craver, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
  • "Recruitment and Repatriation: Understanding the Dynamics of Mexican Immigration in the Southwest, 1910-1940,"
    Monica D. Ketchum, Western Arizona College
  • "'Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen': Amateur Blackface Minstrelry in Japanese Internment and Americanization Propaganda during World War II,"
    Rhea Lynn Barnes, Harvard University

Workshop: A Quest for Freedom: The African American Experience in the West
Presenter:

Herbert G. Ruffin II, Syracuse University

Session Abstract:
What has been typically overlooked in the contemporary mainstream's narrative of the U.S. West are forums designed to develop the next generation of instructors on teaching and researching the region's racial frontier. This workshop, A Quest for Freedom, proposes to rectify that oversight as an African American West training session that has been designed to stimulate critical reflections about this rich subject. A Quest for Freedom will open its session to address setting the foundation for understanding African American West history and to set learning targets. This will be followed by a mini-lesson on the Black West as a site of new knowledge, deeply rooted in one of the under-researched frontiers in U.S. West literature in twentieth century urban West history. This will set the stage for a work period in which participants spend a good part of their session in small groups discussing the "African American West during the Second Great Migration" and developing syllabuses that incorporate blacks into their U.S. West courses. A Quest for Freedom ends after participants have been debriefed, reflecting on how they plan to incorporate the racial frontier concept into their U.S. West history courses.

Paper Session: Freedom, Violence, and Conservatism in the West: Three Community Studies
Chair: TBA
Papers:

  • "The Elusive Quest for Freedom by African Americans at St Louis's Gateway to the Trans-Mississippi West, 1810s to 2014,"
    Linda Housch Collins, St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley
  • "Ku Klux Kern: A Community's Response to the 1920s Ku Klux Klan in Kern County, California,"
    Alicia E. Rodriquez, California State University, Bakersfield
  • "The Sunset Belt: Twentieth Century Capitalism and Conservatism in the San Diego Borderlands,"
    Daniel Elkin, University of Arkansas

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Roundtable: Asian American and Pacific Islander History
Moderator: David K Yoo, UCLA
Panelists:
Cindy I-Fen Cheng, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Alfred P. Flores, UCLA
Jean Paul deGuzman, University of California, Santa Barbara
Jane Hong, Occidental College

Session Abstract:
Although Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI)have long been part of the history of the United States West, the tendency has been for Chinese Americans (Gold Rush and transcontinental railroad) and Japanese Americans (World War II incarceration) to "stand in" for the incredibly diverse set of communities that fall under the umbrella categories of "Asian American" and "Pacific Islander." Through the work of many professional historians, independent scholars, and community activists over the past three decades, there now exists a considerable body of literature documenting and analyzing these histories that intersect with many central themes of United States history including empire, war, migration, race, and political economy. The U.S. West, in particular, has been a key region for many of these histories, even as Asian American and Pacific Islander communities call into question how we conceive of the United State of America. This roundtable will engage in a wide-ranging discussion of AAPI histories that address historiography, method, sources, and teaching issues.

1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Plenary Session: White Wash Documentary Film Screening and Discussion: Race, Surfing and the Romanticized Beach Culture of Southern California
Moderators:
Alison Rose Jefferson, University of California, Santa Barbara
Ted Woods, Documentary Filmmaker

Session Abstract:
The documentary film, "White Wash" presents a different lens than traditionally has been looked through to examine the California Dream, beach culture and popular culture. In this documentary, filmmaker Ted Woods investigates overlooked history of how African Americans have experienced aquatic culture and the various forces including racism, that have impacted their full participation in these leisure and sports realms. African Americans and California water culture including surfing are examined, with a third of the film discussing black female and male surfers, a subject that has not been examined in sports and recreation, or African American history scholarship.Historian Alison Rose Jefferson and filmmaker Ted Woods will introduce the documentary, and will lead a discussion afterward.


Sunday, July 19

8:30 am - 10:00 am 

Paper Session: Public History, Historic Preservation, and Diversity in the West
Chair:
Amy J. Kinsel, Shoreline Community College, Seattle, WA
Papers:

  • "Diversifying the Old West: Including Minority Stories at Bodie State Historic Park,"
    Megan Suster, University of California, Riverside
  • "Examining the Racialized Landscape: Historic Preservation and the Japanese Hospital in Boyle Heights,"
    Kristen Hayashi, University of California, Riverside
  • "The New Deal and the West: Linking History to Local Communities in the Classroom with The Living New Deal,"
    Douglas W. Dodd, California State University, Bakersfield

Workshop: Ventura College History & Pre-Law Association's Oral History Project
Presenters:

Colleen M. Coffey, Ventura College
Associate Professor, History
Coordinator, Pathway to Law School
Michael K. Ward, Ventura College Associate Professor, History Department Chair

Session Abstract:
The Ventura College History & Pre-Law Association's Oral History project collects and prepares oral histories for contribution to the Museum of Ventura County archives and oral history collections, with duplicates placed in the oral history collection in the Buroughs Library at Ventura College. At Ventura College this effort is part of the ongoing Historic Ventura County Research Project that, in addition to assembling oral histories, utilizes many of the rich primary source materials available for research in local and regional histories, including the extensive collections at the Museum of Ventura County. Since 2012 students at Ventura College have used these sources to produce individual student papers, many of which have been presented at historical conferences, and particularly at the Annual History of Ventura County Research & Oral History Symposium at Ventura College (the schedules of the past three symposia are attached). This event is conducted in collaboration with local museums and community members.

Coffey and Ward will conduct a workshop session on the Ventura College History & Pre-Law Association's Oral History Project as it relates to regional and local history, public history and inter-institutional and community collaboration. The workshop will employ a range of media from audio-visual to traditional printed materials, all of which illustrate the methods and result of their efforts, and serve as excellent vehicles to discuss useful strategies for such work at other colleges. Coffey and Ward will co-lead this proposed workshop with additional supports from one or more of their students who continue to work with the project.

10:30 am  - 12:00 pm

Paper Session: Paths to Understanding the Native American Experience in the West
Chair: TBA
Papers:

  • "Frontiers, Borderlands, and Middle Grounds: Historical Interpretation, Diversity, and the Classroom,"
    Derrick D. McKisick, Texas A&M University – Commerce
  • "Rejecting the Terminal Narrative: Reintegrating Native American Experiences and Perspectives into the Recent US History Survey,"
    Monica D. Ketchum, Arizona Western College
  • "The Phoenix Indian Legacy Project: Understanding the Native American Experience through Oral History,"
    Farina Noelani King, Arizona State University

Paper Session: We Remember Them: The Isla Vista Tragedy
Co-Presented and Led by
Melissa Barthelemy and Anne M. Platoff, University of California, Santa Barbara

Papers:

  • "We Remember Them: From Memorial Sites to Exhibition," Melissa Barthelemy University of California, Santa Barbara
    On May 23, 2014 the lives of six University of California at Santa Barbara students were suddenly taken in a mass murder crime spree committed in Isla Vista, the residential and commercial area that borders the UCSB campus. This paper discusses some of the challenges and lessons learned in creating a collection of artifacts pertaining to the Isla Vista Tragedy, as a joint effort between the Public History Program and Special Collections Department of the UCSB Library. The collection that emerged from the spontaneous memorial sites in Isla Vista has now become the focal point in an exhibition planned for the one-year anniversary of the incident.
  • "Material Culture of a Community Trauma: Building a Memorial Collection Out of the Isla Vista Tragedy," Anne M. Platoff, University of California, Santa Barbara 
    When tragedy strikes your community most people don't immediately think about preserving the material objects associated with the social mourning process. This paper will discuss the process we have undertaken to collect, document, and preserve materials that document not only the university's response to the tragic events in Isla Vista on May 23, 2014, but also the way in which the university and local community came together to grieve and to work to recover from this tragedy. It will address how the team has collected materials and how we are organizing them so that historians and other scholars will be able to access them in the future. Our end product will be a hybrid collection of both physical and digital objects. This collection will be a valuable resource for scholars in many different fields.