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Meetings & Events


Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Sessions by special interest

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Meal Functions

Friday, April 17

Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Luncheon
Cost $50
Sponsored by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Presidential Address: "Movable Empire: Labor Migration, U.S. Global Power, and the Remaking of the Americas"
Special Guest: Julie Greene, University of Maryland
Julie Greene is professor of history at the University of Maryland and, with Ira Berlin, co-director of the Center for the History of the New America. Her interests span across working-class and immigration history, the history of empire, and transnational approaches to the history of the Americas. Her many publications include Pure and Simple Politics: The American Federation of Labor and Political Activism, 1881–1917 (1998) and, most recently, The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal (2009), The Organization of American Historians awarded The Canal Builders its 2009 James A. Rawley Prize for the best book on the history of race relations. Greene was founding cochair of the Labor and Working-Class History Association in 1997–1999, and she is currently president of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and  Progressive Era.

SHGAPE Reception
Sponsored by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
SHGAPE will host a reception for all SHGAPE members and meeting attendees interested in the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. SHGAPE was formed in 1989 to encourage innovative and wide-ranging research and teaching on this critical period of historical transformation. SHGAPE publishes the quarterly Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and awards book and article prizes for distinguished scholarship.


Thursday, April 16

1:45 pm - 3:15 pm 

The Legacy of C. Vann Woodward's Origins of the New South in the Twenty-First Century
Sponsored by the Society for the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Chair:
Michael O'Brien, University of Cambridge
Panelists:
• Natalie Ring, University of Texas at Dallas
• Jonathan Wells, Temple University
• Tammy Ingram, College of Charleston
• Sarah Gardner, Mercer University
Is C. Vann Wodward's Origins of the New South a book that students and scholars must read? Is it only relevant for southern history and its new generation of historians, or can it help us better understand American history in general? Unlike the participants in almost all other retrospectives on this book, we are a group of scholars who
did not study with or personally know Woodward. Panelists will explain the book's relationship to key themes that still animate the field of southern history, including class conflict, Progressive reform, political ideology, and the complicated relationship between the disciplines of history and literature.

Friday, April 17

9:00 am - 10:30 am 

Corporal Punishment, Capital Punishment, and Performance in the 19th-Century South
Endorsed by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Chair:
Victoria Bynum, Texas State University, San Marcos
Commentator:
Jeff Forret, Lamar University
"I Got Stripes": The Whipping of Poor White Southerners in the Late Antebellum Era
Keri Leigh Merritt, Independent Scholar
White Punishment and African American and Native American Defiance at Hampton Institute
Clay Cooper, Middle Tennessee State University
"The Hanging of Bad Tom Smith": Public Execution and Civil Religion in the Victorian South
Bob Hutton, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

10:50 am - 12:20 pm 

A Lasting Legacy: Coercive Labor Systems in Post–Civil War America
Endorsed by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE) and the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)
Chair:
Pete Daniel, Independent Scholar
Commentator:
Paul Ortiz, University of Florida
Peonage and Prostitution: Women Workers at Florida's Cross City Turpentine Camps, 1900 to 1921
Catherine Gyllerstrom, Auburn University
"Only Woman Blacksmith in America is a Convict": Black Women and Prison Labor in the New South
Talitha LeFlouria, Florida Atlantic University
Debt Peonage in Judicial and Political Transition: Unfree Labor in Territorial New Mexico and the Post-War American South
William Kiser, Arizona State University

1:50 pm -3:20 pm

Politicizing Taboos: The Suffrage Campaign, Urban Space, and the Realignment of Gender Roles in the Early Twentieth Century
Sponsored by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Chair:
Susan Goodier, Hamilton College
Commentator:
Maureen Flanagan, Illinois Institute of Technology
When Women Occupy Wall Street
Amy Shore, State University of New York at Oswego
"They Will Not be Shut Out": Suffragists' Mobilization of "Dangerous" Spaces in Gotham
Lauren Santangelo, New-York Historical Society/The New School
Fashioning the Public Sphere: Suffrage Fashions and the Transformation of the Political Landscape
Einav Rabinovtich-Fox, New York University

Saturday, April 18

9:00 am - 10:30 am 

The Limits of Freedom: Labor, Violence, and Coercion in the American West
Endorsed by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE) and the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)
Chair:
Gunther Peck, Duke University
Commentator:
Stacey Smith, Oregon State University
What Limits? Bound Indian Labor in the American West and the Fallacy of the "Natural Limits of Slavery" Argument
Michael Magliari, California State University, Chico
Creating a Free White Workforce in Northwestern California: Labor, Violence, and Environment, 1860–1906
Michael Karp, Saint Louis University
"A slave in Uncle Sam's service": Military Labor after the Thirteenth Amendment
Hope McGrath, University of Pennsylvania

Sympathy for the Sinner: The Problem of Humanitarian Feeling from the Early Republic to the Progressive Era
Endorsed by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Chair and Commentator: Daniel Wickberg, University of Texas at Dallas
Suffering Sinners: Pain, Sympathy, and the "Fallen Woman"
Margaret Abruzzo, University of Alabama
Making Room for Mercy: Pardoning and Executing Discretion in the Progressive Era
Carolyn Strange, Australian National University
Sympathetic Sentiment and the Psychological Treatment of Prisoners in the Progressive Era
Amy Louise Wood, Illinois State University

Sunday, April 19

10:45 am - 12;15 pm 

Marriage on the Margins: Contested Romance and the Limits of Spousal Legitimacy
Endorsed by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Chair:
Renee Romano, Oberlin College
Commentator:
Elizabeth H. Pleck, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
The Taboo on Cousin Marriage in the History of America and in American History
Susan McKinnon, University of Virginia
Social Reformers and the Racialization of American Child Marriage at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Nicholas Syrett, University of Northern Colorado
I Am My Own Stepfather: Stepparent-Stepchild Marriage in American Law and Media, 1890–1920
William Kuby, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga