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Meetings & Events


Tours

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Friday, April 17
St. Louis: From Civil Rights to Civil War Tour
8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Limited to 40 participants
Cost $25.00

Saturday, April 18
Cahokia

10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Limited to 40 participants 
Cost: $35.00

Friday, April 17
Missouri History Museum &
St. Louis Art Museum

10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Limited to 40 participants
Cost: $25.00

Saturday, April 18
The Queer History of St. Louis's Central West End

11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Limited to 25 participants
Cost: $40.00

Friday, April 17
Tracing Place Memory in East St. Louis

10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Limited to 45 participants

 

Friday, April 17

St. Louis: From Civil Rights to Civil War Tour
8:30 am - 12:30 pm

Limited to 50 participants
Cost $TBD

This tour will start at the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel. The tour guide is Civil War historian Louis Gerteis of the University of Missouri – St. Louis. The first stop is St. Louis's Old Court House, which is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Here tourists will meet with National Park Historian Bob Moore. The Old Courthouse was the site of the first two trials of the Dred Scott case, 1847 and 1850, respectively. The next stop will be at the St. Louis Arsenal. The role of this crucial site in the events of 1861 will be discussed. Finally, the tour will visit the Missouri Civil War Museum and grounds at Historic Jefferson Barracks, where participants will be greeted by the Jefferson Barracks Curator, Daniel Gonzales. Tourists are encouraged to wear comfortable shoes. Bottled water will be provided.

 

 


Missouri History Museum &
St. Louis Art Museum

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Limited to 50 people
Cost: $25.00


This tour offers a visit to the two of the most important cultural institutions in St. Louis.
The History Museum hosts a series of revealing exhibits on the past and present in St. Louis. A major exhibition exploring the 250th anniversary of the founding of St. Louis will be on display during the 2015 OAH meeting. Meanwhile, the St. Louis Art Museum has permanent exhibitions showcasing the museum's particular strengths in American Art, European modernism, and early modern Europe. The American Gallery features the work by George Caleb Bingham, whose large-scale portraits of daily life in the mid-nineteenth century provide a remarkable view of politics and culture in the United States.
The History Museum and the Art Museum have both undergone major renovations over the past decade, adding new wings and emerging as state-of-the-art museum spaces.
A bus will take visitors to both museums. Each visit will begin with a quick overview of the collections by a member of the museum staff, followed by approximately one hour to view the galleries.
Visiting these two institutions also provides an opportunity to see Forest Park, a remarkable example of the urban park movement of the late nineteenth century. Located at the western edge of St. Louis, Forest Park (like Central Park in New York or Hyde Park in Chicago) was originally developed in reaction to increased urbanization. Forest Park later became the site of the 1904 World's Fair. It remains a vital part of cultural life in St. Louis.

 

The Louisiana Purchase: Making St. Louis, Remaking America - Missouri History Musem
October 25, 2014 - April 19, 2015
In 1803, the United States agreed to pay France $15 million for the Louisiana Territory—828,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River. The United States doubled its size, expanding the nation westward. Beyond the geographic expansion, The Louisiana Purchase remade St. Louis into an American city—and reshaped and redefined what it meant to be an American. Featuring loans from the National Archives and documents and artifacts from the Missouri History Museum's collections, the exhibition will explore the complex negotiations related to The Louisiana Purchase and its aftereffect on St. Louis. A highlight of the exhibition is the Treaty of Cession (in French), better known as The Louisiana Purchase Treaty. The Treaty was first drafted in French and then translated into English, so it can be said that the French text is the "original original."

Organized by the Missouri History Museum in partnership with the National Archives.

Presented by Edward Jones, Emerson, and Wells Fargo.
With additional support by William T. Kemper Foundation.

Tracing Place Memory in East St. Louis
Sponsored by the Missouri Council for History Education
10:00 am—12:00 pm
Limited to 45 people
Tour led by Michael R. Allen; Director, Preservation Research Office; University College Coordinator and Lecturer, American Culture Studies Program, Washington University in St. Louis.

St. Louis' disconnected sister city, East St. Louis, sports the battle scars of depopulation and loss of industry. Look Magazine named East St. Louis an "All America City" in 1960, when the city boasted 82,000 residents but already showed signs of economic trouble ahead. Developed as St. Louis' workshop, with factories and railyards outside of the jurisdiction of urban nuisance regulation, East St. Louis developed a culture of its own. That culture encompassed impressive industrial production replete with national records in meatpacking, steel founding and later petrochemicals as well as traumatic incidents during the 1886 General Strike and 1917 race riots (or massacre, according to many).

Today, the city has 28,000 residents and few of its former major industries. Those that remain are outside of the corporate limits and taxing power. St. Louis has made the Mississippi River into a wall, making the city invisible in many regional narratives. Yet East St. Louis continues to rebuild itself, and public history is at the forefront of the city's re-imagined self. The tour will investigate the ways in which memory is inscribed across a city marked by divisions, demolition and vacancy. From Miles Davis' childhood home to the powerful ruin of the Armour Packing Plant, from the newly-designated downtown historic district to Native American sites interpreted as part of a prospective regional mounds heritage trail, East St. Louis' emergent new identity places cultural resources at center. Participants will get a look at many of these resources, both invisible and visible. What East St. Louis will we see today?

 

Saturday, April 18 

Cahokia - SOLD OUT
10:00 am - 2:00 pm 

Limited to 50 people
Cost: $35.00

Located less than twenty minutes from downtown St. Louis, Cahokia Mounds constitutes one of the most important Indian history sites in North America. It also provides a remarkable opportunity to rethink how we teach early American history. With most surveys focusing their discussion of pre-contact Indians on the Aztec and Inca cultures, a visit to Cahokia offers an introduction to the Indian society that dominated a major portion of what now constitutes the United States.
First settled over a thousand years ago, by the thirteenth century Cahokia had become the center of an extended Native American polity that controlled politics and trade throughout the region. At its height, Cahokia's population may have reached 40,000, one of the largest cities in the world in the thirteenth century and the most extensive and complex indigenous society north of pre-Columbian Mexico. No city in what became the United States exceeded Cahokia's population until Philadelphia's growth in the late-eighteenth century. Cahokia became the wellspring for the Mississippian culture that extended throughout much of the continental interior up through Indian Removal in the nineteenth century.
The massive central mound—over 100 feet high and almost 1,000 feet long—remains intact. Meanwhile, ongoing archaeological investigation is regularly revealing new details of life at Cahokia. A superb interpretative center includes archaeological artifacts, reconstructions of village life, and a short movie that provides a quick orientation to Cahokia and the surrounding region.


The Queer History of St. Louis's Central West End
11:00 am - 2:00 pm

Limited to 25 participants 
Cost: $40.00

This guided walking tour explores the Central West End neighborhood, which for most of the second half of the twentieth century was a regionally important hub of gay and lesbian community building and political organizing.
St. Louis's queer history stretches at least as far back as Gilded Age, when the Gateway City was a rapidly growing industrial center. During this period and for decades after, a largely underground queer subculture flourished in and around downtown. Meanwhile, the Central West End was an eminently respectable and almost entirely white residential district favored by city's well-to-do. This period bequeathed to the neighborhood a heritage of beautiful homes, apartment buildings, and houses of worship that can still be appreciated today.
Post-World War II white flight, economic decline, and urban renewal transformed the Central West End and its environs. As many affluent white families abandoned the neighborhood for booming suburbs, the Central West End became both a racially liminal space and a magnet for queer people. From the 1960s to the 1990s, it was St. Louis's principal "gay ghetto" and the epicenter of the city's lesbian and gay movement
The tour features a number of places of historical interest, such as the childhood homes of William S. Burroughs and Tennessee Williams; pioneering LGBT-affirming churches; and the site of St. Louis's first gay community center. Also included is Forest Park, where sociologist Laud Humphreys conducted the research that resulted in his controversial book Tearoom Trade (1970), as well as the location of the offices of sex researchers Masters and Johnson. Together, these tour stops offer an overview of St. Louis's LGBT past and opportunities to reflect on how queer people fit into larger histories of race, religion, and urban change.
As this walking tour will mostly take place outdoors, comfortable, weather-appropriate clothing and shoes are recommended.