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Meetings & Events


Workshops

Teaching Taboo Subjects in Your History Survey Courses
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

Friday, April 17
8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Cost: $25.00

How to Make Your Classroom the Ultimate Participatory Experience

Friday, April 17
8:00 am - 12:15 pm
Cost: $25.00

Introduction to Oral History and the Environment
Sponsored by the Committee on Public History and the Oral History Association

Saturday, April 18
8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Cost: $10.00

THATCamp

Saturday, April 18
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Cost: $30.00

Doing History in the National Park Service: NPS 101
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on National Park Service Collaboration, Historic Preservation Program, Department of History, Southeast Missouri State University

Saturday, April 18
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: $10.00

Reliving History in the Classroom / Reacting to the Past Workshop: "Trial of Anne Hutchinson: Liberty, Law and Intolerance in Puritan New England" - SOLD OUT

Saturday, April 18
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: $35.00

Friday, April  17

Teaching Taboo Subjects in Your History Survey Courses
8:00 am to 1:00 pm
Cost: $25.00
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

American history survey courses are rife with topics that are complex and controversial. Intensification of the so-called "culture wars" in recent years has rendered some difficult topics more tricky than ever to discuss in a large college classroom. This workshop provides instructors with an opportunity to share their experiences and concerns while developing new perspectives, skills, and strategies to meet the ongoing challenge of talking about "taboo subjects" in their survey courses.


How to Make Your Classroom the Ultimate Participatory Experience
8:30 AM to 12:15 PM
Cost: $25.00 – Limit 32 people
Chair: Debra Michlewitz, Gilder Lehrman Institute of Ameican History
Panelists: Franco Scardino, Townsend Harris High School at Queens College, Michael Holmes, High School of American Studies at Lehman College, Alex Wood, Townsend Harris High School at Queens College

Call it Ultimate Teaching. The session showcases four varied creative classroom programs, suitable for pre-college and introductory college course settings. The pedagogical strategies showcased in this workshop prompt students to participate and engage in thoughtful hands-on learning experiences.
Come play American Forum for Global Education's "Road Game." The Road Game dramatizes the complex relationship between society, citizens, laws, and government.
The Taft Institute's "Election Simulation" will bring out your inner politician and expose your students to the dynamic world of electoral politics. The Election Simulation connects a government or civics course to a real time, real world election, motivating students to closely follow current events and research policy during the months that lead up to Election Day. You will have a chance to engage in Election Simulation activities and learn how to set up your own simulation.
Experience a demonstration of the case study method, advocated by the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. Their web site archives a peer-reviewed collection of case studies with interdisciplinary connections to geography, public health, sociology, environmental science, and statistics. The demonstration presents a new case study, An Unlikely Hero: The Rise of Henrietta Lacks, which investigates an intersection between cancer treatment, government's informal and formal role in access to treatment, and ethics in medical research.
The National History Day presentation models the methodology of leading students through the process of selecting a NHD theme related topic, developing a research question, establishing a thesis, and finally selecting a category in which to compete.
The session is structured as four mini-workshops with a reliance on hands-on activities for participants, with time to debrief, share assessment activities, and connect to the Common Core Standards. We'll refuel midway with a working coffee break. Participants receive a flash drive with the session's plans, worksheets, and resources. Channel your inner pre-college, introductory college course student.


Saturday, April 18

Introduction to Oral History and the Environment
Sponsored by the Committee on Public History and the Oral History Association
8:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Cost: $10.00
Presenter: Jeff Corrigan, The State Historical Society of Missouri

This introductory workshop offers an informative overview to oral history methodology from initial idea through finished product, with an emphasis on environmental oral histories. Although focused on the environment these skills are transferable to any oral history project. Discussions will cover three sub-categories of oral history--pre-interview, interview, and post-interview—and will include legal and ethical considerations, recording technologies (audio and video), writing interview outlines, setting up and conducting successful interviews, transcription, digital preservation and topics of interest to learners. The workshop will be helpful to a variety of history practitioners in academic and public settings

THATCamp
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Cost: $30.00 – Limit: 75 people

In a traditional academic conference, panelists share answers. At THATCamp, participants explore questions.
THATCamp participants set the agenda in the morning by proposing and voting on the sessions. Someone might propose a session aimed at exploring ways that technology could be useful in the peer review process. Another participant might ask a direct question such as "how can data mining help my research?" Participants with experience volunteer to lead a session that will teach those skills.
Some sessions may focus on learning a skill or launching a collaborative project. Others sessions will feature discussions about pedagogy, sharing research, public history, or a host of other topics. You might start the day with an instructional sessions on the basics of web design or writing code, have a discussion about the utility of technology in the classroom, learn some basics of data mining that will help you with a current research project, and end the day by joining your new friends in creating a public history web site or application.
Sessions can be proposed on the THATCamp OAH 2015 website or they can be proposed on the morning of THATCamp. The most popular 12-16 sessions will be held throughout the day. Participants are free to move from one session to another or plan spontaneous sessions based on questions that come up throughout the day. This last part is key--some of the best sessions might not appeal to a large number of participants so even if the session doesn't make the official cut it can still happen in an informal manner in the lobby.
Sounds great but....
The best part of THATCamp is the collegiality, so please do not worry that participants will be expected to come with anything more than a willingness to learn and share. THATCamp works best when there are a large number of first time attendees and people with diverse backgrounds and skills. Have concerns about technology? So will many of your fellow participants--let's talk about it.


Doing History in the National Park Service: NPS 101
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on National Park Service Collaboration, Historic Preservation Program, Department of History, Southeast Missouri State University
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Cost: $10.00
Chair: Mark William Harvey, North Dakota State University
Panelists: Laura A. Miller, President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace National Historic Site, Pamela K Sanfilippo, National Park Service, Donald L. Stevens Jr., Midwest Region, National Park Service, Bob Moore, Jefferson National Expansion , Tim Good, Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site

This workshop, organized by the OAH Committee on National Park Service collaboration, focuses on history programming in the National Park Service. The committee seeks to implement a recommendation in the OAH report, Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service that the organization will "ensure that every OAH annual meeting has an NPS 101 workshop to introduce future researchers to NPS opportunities and structures."

The workshop is divided into two parts. In the first half, panelists representing several NPS sites in the Midwest will discuss their work and the opportunities and challenges it presents to help introduce OAH annual meeting attendees unfamiliar with NPS history programs. The panelists will collectively provide an overview of history programming in the National Park Service sites that they represent, and touch on such topics as research and education, the preservation mission of the NPS, civic engagement efforts within the NPS, and opportunities for historians to engage park staff and visitors.

The second half of the workshop will feature breakout sessions with each of the panelists serving as discussion leaders. Attendees may circulate as they wish, ask questions, and learn in more detail about each panelist's historical work and its challenges and opportunities.

Reliving History in the Classroom / Reacting to the Past Workshop: "Trial of Anne Hutchinson: Liberty, Law and Intolerance in Puritan New England"
9:00 am–12:00 pm
Cost: $35.00 –- Limit 20 people - SOLD OUT
Chair: Helen Gaudette, Queens College, CUNY
Presenter: Mark C. Carnes, Barnard College

Relive history by participating in a Reacting to the Past Workshop. Experience a mini-version of what can be a weekend, week, month, or semester-long learning project for your students. Reacting to the Past (RTTP) is a role- playing teaching strategy with a good list of ready-to-go titles and topics available for pre-college and college classrooms. The "Trial of Anne Hutchinson: Liberty, Law and Intolerance in Puritan New England" is one example with clear relevance to the theme of Taboos. Larry Carver, Director of the Liberal Arts Honors Programs, University of Texas at Austin, observes on the RTTP website "I have never seen students this engaged. They write more than the assignments require; everyone, shy or not, participates vigorously in the debates. They read important texts with real understanding, making complex arguments and ideas their own." The web site also notes that "RTTP has been implemented at over 300 colleges and universities in the United States and abroad. The initiative is sustained by the Reacting Consortium, an alliance of colleges and universities that promotes imagination, inquiry, and engagement as foundational features of teaching and learning in higher education. The Consortium provides programs for faculty development and curricular change, including a regular series of conferences and workshops, online instructor resources, and consulting services." Reacting to the Past games are used in a wide range of courses in undergraduate and some graduate programs; although some AP faculty have made use of Reacting games in high schools, the Reacting Consortium of colleges and universities, which governs the Reacting initiative, does not presently support pre-college applications. Mark C. Carnes, whose original concept was greatly expanded by an infusion of hundreds of faculty during the past decade, has completed a book on the pedagogy, called Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College. Our three hour participatory session will demonstrate the various, creative, lively activities which motivate students to closely read, analyze, and cite texts and primary sources. Participants in this session will receive roles, handbook, and reading materials after registration so that they can arrive ready to play the game. The session will close with a discussion of the value of the game as a history teaching strategy and an opportunity to ask questions about the incorporation of RTTP into your course of study or student life.