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Meetings & Events


Plenaries

Worst. President. Ever.

Thursday, April 7
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Historian Presidents

Thursday, April 7
5:15 pm - 6:45 pm

 

Can We Use History?

 

Friday, April 8
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

The National Park Service at 100: A Conversation with Robert Stanton

 

Friday, April 8
5:15 pm - 6:45 pm

Worst. President. Ever.

Thursday, April 7 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Chair: Claire Potter, The New School
Speakers:
David Greenberg, Rutgers University
Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University
Jacob Weisberg, The Slate Group

Discussions of leadership frequently turn to the U.S. presidency, and discussions of the presidency frequently turn to ratings. The top presidents, and the reasons for their greatness, are familiar and literally graven in stone. The worst presidents, though, are a more nebulous group. We take the time and expertise of a variety of top historians to talk about what makes for poor performance in the White House, how we know it, and what it tells us about American leadership more generally.

 


Historian Presidents

Thursday, April 7 | 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm

Chair: Jon Butler, Yale University
Panelists:
Drew Faust, Harvard University
Ricardo Romo, University of Texas, San Antonio
Edward Ayers, University of Richmond
Earl Lewis, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

The Plenary Sessions features four prominent historians who lead or have lead universities, organizations and foundations. OAH president-elect Ed Ayers will lead a discussion that will take up the challenges and rewards of leading complex institutions.
We have asked the panelists to consider several questions: As a productive, working historian, why did you agree to take a job as a president of a university or foundation or as a dean or director? What in your scholarly life has made a difference in your administrative life? Looking back, do you think scholars, and historians specifically, should encourage graduate training in academic leadership? What tools should we look to develop? What are the pleasures of academic administration? The obstacles, pitfalls, problems? And finally, we are snowed with accounts of the academy in crisis, of the humanities pushed to the sidelines, of declining enrollments in history. How have these stories looked from your office?

 


Can We Use History?

Friday, April 8
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Presenter:  Paul Krugman, CUNY Graduate Center; Luxembourg Income Study Center; Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University
Discussants:

• Naomi Lamoreaux, Yale University
• Eric Rauchway, University of California, Davis

These are glory days for economic historians. Those who knew their economic history were far more successful at tracking and predicting events since the global financial crisis than those who didn't. Yet policymakers have repeatedly ignored the lessons of history. Can this ever change?

Paul Krugman holds two titles at C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center, distinguished professor in the Economics Ph.D program and distinguished scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center. In addition, he is Professor Emeritus of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. He is best-known to the general public as Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, a position he's held since 2000.

In 2008, Krugman was the sole recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work on international trade theory. In 2011, Time magazine ranked his New York Times blog, "The Conscience of a Liberal," as number one in their listing of "The 25 Best Financial Blogs."

In addition to the Nobel, Krugman is the recipient of John Bates Clark Medal from the American Economic Association, an award given every two years to a top economist under the age of 40. He also received the Asturias Award given by the King of Spain, considered to be the European Pulitzer Prize.

Author or editor of more than 25 books and over 200 published professional articles, Krugman has written extensively for non-economists as well. Before joining the staff of The New York Times, his work appeared in Fortune, Slate, Foreign Policy, The New Republic and Newsweek.

Krugman's approach to economics is reaching a new generation of college students. He and Robin Wells have coauthored college textbooks on Micro and Macroeconomics that rank in the top-selling economics textbooks used in American colleges today.

Krugman has served on the faculties of MIT, Yale and Stanford. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and a member of the Group of Thirty. He has served as a consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, as well as to foreign countries including Portugal and the Philippines. In his twenties, he served as senior international economist for the President's Council of Economic Advisers under Ronald Reagan.

He is a regular contributor to ABC-TV's "This Week" with George Stephanopoulos and makes frequent appearances on Charlie Rose, PBS NewsHour, Bloomberg Television, NPR and MSNBC.

Krugman's four recent trade books, End This Depression Now!, The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008, The Conscience of a Liberal and The Great Unraveling became New York Times bestsellers.


 

The National Park Service at 100: A Conversation with Robert Stanton

Friday, April 8
5:15 pm - 6:45 pm

Chair and Commentator: Gary Nash, University of California, Los Angeles
Panelists:
Robert Stanton, National Park Service
William Cronon, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Joan Zenzen, Independent Historian

This plenary explores the significance of the 2016 Centennial of the National Park Service and the importance of leadership to the history of the agency. Chaired by Gary Nash (a member of the NPS "Second Century" Commission and co-author of the OAH-sponsored study Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service), the session will feature a conversation between former NPS Director Robert Stanton, eminent environmental historian William Cronon, and NPS scholar and public historian Joan Zenzen. OAH collaboration with the NPS has provided historians with an opportunity to apply their historical expertise to a public purpose: building bridges between scholarship and public audiences, and between the academy and the world of the NPS. This wide-ranging and provocative discussion will consider the agency's past, present, and future, and the ways in which the OAH can contribute to shaping the agency's next century.
Nearly 300 million Americans every year visit the more than 400 units of the National Park Service and still more encounter NPS history through the National Register of Historic Places, the National Historic Landmarks Program, and other efforts to document, preserve, and interpret the nation's past. The vision and health of what's often called America's largest outdoor classroom is of vital concern to all historians. Please join us for a lively panel.
The audience is invited to remain after the plenary for a reception co-hosted by the OAH Public History Committee and the Committee on the OAH/NPS Collaboration and to engage the panel in further discussion of the past and future of this important agent of popular historical knowledge.