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Meetings & Events


Workshops

Unique Leadership Narratives and Diversity in the Classroom
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

Friday, April 8
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Cost: $25.00

Start Your First Digital Public History Project
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Public History

Friday, April 8
9:00 am - 11:00 am
Cost: $10.00

Using Digital History

Saturday, April 9
8:30 am - 11:30 am

The Material Culture of Leadership: A Workshop with Objects, Images, and Texts
Endorsed by the OAH Committee on Public History

Saturday, April 9
1:50 pm - 3:50 pm 

Networking in the Hinterland

Saturday, April 9
10:50 am - 12:20 pm 

Friday, April  8

Unique Leadership Narratives and Diversity in the Classroom
9:00 am to 1:00 pm
Cost: $25.00 - Limit 40 people
Solicited by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

The workshop focuses on people in American history who came from diverse backgrounds with significant disadvantages and succeeded in becoming leaders in American society. Narratives from all components of American society capture students' attention and fosters engagement with the classroom material.

The Importance of Frederick Douglass
Steven S. Berizzi, Norwalk Community College, Norwalk, Connecticut

Lucy Parsons Socialist and Activist: Female leadership in the Socialist Movement
Darlene Antezana, Prince George's Community College


 'You Have to Move the Furniture: Exploring Leadership and Interactive Learning – "Reacting to the Past" in the Classroom'
Betsy Powers, Lonestar Community College – Montgomery Texas

Start Your First Digital History Project
9:00 am - 12:00 pm 
Cost: $10.00 – Limit 40 people
Solicited by the OAH Committee on Public History

Presenters: 
Sharon M. Leon, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Sheila A. Brennan, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University

Do you have a great digital public history project idea, but you are not quite sure how to start? Work through the different stages of planning with experienced digital history project directors, Sharon Leon and Sheila Brennan from the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University.
Come with an idea, and we will talk through the planning and scoping process. We will begin by framing a need, recognizing an opportunity, and identifying specific audiences with whom the project will collaborate and serve. Other topics covered will include locating and fostering relationships with potential partners and collaborators, and how to choose appropriate digital technologies for accomplishing the goals of the project. Finally, the group will discuss funding possibilities. Each participant will leave the workshop with concrete steps to take following the conference, along with worksheets to guide future planning.


Saturday, April 9

Using Digital History
8:30 am to 11:30 am
Cost: $10.00

Presenters: 
Emily Thompson, Princeton University
Stephen Berry, University of Georgia
Russell Desimone
Erick Chaput, The Lawrenceville School
Joseph Caprio, Providence College

Authors of three significant web-based projects will explain how their sites are meant to work. The session will give scholars and teachers interested in using their materials a chance to explore these sites and to discuss how they might be useful for teaching and research. Participants will explore CSIDixie , Roaring'Twenties , and The Dorr Rebellion.
- "The Roaring 'Twenties" is a multimedia, interactive website about noise in New York City circa 1929. The project embeds historical sound recordings - footage from Fox Movietone newsreels - within a rich context of historical documentation from the City's Municipal Archives and allows users to chart their own journeys through all this material. Letters of complaint to the Mayor and Health Commissioner, maps, health department inspection reports, and articles from newspapers and magazines bring the daily texture of the era to life and promote a historically-minded way of listening to the past.

The Dorr Rebellion Project Site was launched in 2011 with an aim to develop an authoritative online open educational resource (OER) on the Dorr Rebellion and to engage in new forms of discourse. The site currently includes an 20-minute documentary that provides a succinct overview of the constitutional crisis that erupted in Rhode Island in 1841-1842, a gallery of images, state-standard lesson plans, a constitutional comparison page, a database of select letters to and from Thomas Wilson Dorr as well as Law & Order correspondence of former governor John Brown Francis, digitized pamphlets, and, finally, links to secondary material at the Rhode Island Historical Society. The workshop presenters will review the history of the 1842 Dorr Rebellion and then walk attendees through various facets of the site discussing the process used to develop different components along the way.
Participants will be asked to bring their own laptops to be able to explore materials and imagine ways of using digital resources.

- Conceived as an experiment in form,"CSI:Dixie" (csidixie.org launching September 2015) is at once a monograph-in-the-making and the online archive out of which it is being written. Devoted to what the coroner's office can reveal about life and death in the nineteenth-century South, CSI:D records could support studies of nineteenth-century abortion, infanticide, alcoholism, suicide, domestic abuse, master-slave murder, and slave-on-slave violence. Much like now, people died differently in the south in the nineteenth-century, and the patterns reveal both the region's sad continuities and our failure consistently to focus on the most important social justice question there is -- who dies where, when, and why?


The Material Culture of Leadership: A Workshop with Objects, Images, and Texts
Endorsed by the OAH Committee on Public History
1:50 pm - 3:50 pm
*no pre-registration required*

Chair and Panelist: Catherine Whalen, Bard Graduate Center
Panelists:
Shirley T. Wajda, Michigan State University Museum
Sarah Jones Weicksel, University of Chicago
James Seaver, Indiana University
David P. Jaffee, Bard Graduate Center
Marla Miller, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Over the course of the past decade, historians have increasingly expressed interest in material and visual culture as both categories of evidence and as teaching tools. The goal of this workshop is introduce and demonstrate approaches to interpreting and teaching history with a combination of material culture, visual culture, and textual sources, all related to the theme of leadership. Participants will work in small groups, each led by a facilitator who will provide objects, images, and primary and secondary texts. Group members will analyze these sources, determining what can be gleaned from each, what cannot, and what is gained by considering them together. Along with engaging in this process of close inspection and comparison, groups will consider what lines of inquiries their analyses could support, which could include the following:
• How have Americans represented leaders and leadership through material culture, visual culture, and texts? Who are their audiences, at home and abroad?
• How have these forms of cultural production both reflected and structured the ways in which Americans, including our readers, students and audiences, have understood relations among leaders, communities, and followers? How have they impacted leaders and leadership?
• How have Americans explicitly articulated and/or tacitly implied the linkages they make between the material things and the immaterial values that they associate with different kinds of leadership: political, civil, economic, technological, entrepreneurial, social, cultural, aesthetic, moral, spiritual, and more?
The facilitators of this session are scholars and curators whose cumulative research interests, teaching experience, and public humanities work in U.S. history span from the colonial era to the present. Their backgrounds include training in history, art history, material culture studies, American studies, museum studies, and public history. Together, they will compile workshop materials drawn from personal collections and the teaching collection of the Michigan State University Museum. These selections will pertain to a wide range of eras in American history and could be incorporated into both thematic and U.S. survey courses. Facilitators will also address the ways in which such materials are or can be integrated into exhibitions, digital projects, oral histories, and other modes of public engagement. Objects, images and texts will include, for example, clothing, devices, domestic accouterments, collectibles, prints, photographs, advertisements, and popular periodicals as well as relevant secondary literature. Subject areas encompass, but are not limited to: slavery and emancipation; temperance and volunteerism; nationalism and imperialism; wartime militarization and postwar reintegration; protest and commemoration; and identity, exclusion, and belonging.
All participants are welcome regardless of their familiarity with working with these forms of historical evidence.

Networking in the HInterland
10:50 am - 12:20 pm
*no pre-registration required*

Chair: Elizabeth Jocoway, Independent Scholar
Panelists:
Beverly Bond, University of Memphis
Seth Cotlar, Williamette University
Jennifer Thigpen, Washington State University

This workshop explores how historians in regions far from such academic hubs as the Northeast, the Bay Area and the Big 10 catchment area can develop peer networks designed to support and enhance their scholarship, teaching and service activities. The presenters have all participated in creating academic communities in places that lack concentrations of population and clusters of colleges and universities. Beverly Bond participates in a writing workshop group that brings together a diverse group of women historians from Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana. Representing the far west is Jennifer Thigpen, who will offer the case history of the Western Association of Women Historians. Seth Cotler has been a member of several writing groups in the Pacific Northwest. Chairing the session is Betsy Jacoway, an independent historian in Newport, Arkansas well known for her success in finding ways to overcome geographic and professional isolation.