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Meetings & Events


Tours

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Thursday, April 6 
9:00 am--1:00 pm
SOLD OUT 
Sunday, April 9
1:00 pm--5:00 pm
SOLD OUT 

 

 

Limit |
38 people each tour
Cost | $40

Visit to the Whitney Plantation

Includes bus trip to and from the Whitney Plantation and guided tour

The New York Times called the Whitney Plantation "the first slavery museum in America." Within the boundaries of the "Habitation Haydel", as the Whitney Plantation was originally known, the story of the Haydel family of German immigrants and the enslaved people that they held were intertwined. In 2014, the Whitney Plantation opened its doors to the public for the first time in its 262 year history as the only plantation museum in Louisiana with a focus on the experience of Africans and African-Americans enslaved at the site. Through museum exhibits, memorial artwork and restored buildings and hundreds of first-person slave narratives, visitors to Whitney will gain a unique perspective on the lives of Louisiana's enslaved people.


Friday, April 7
9:00 am--11:00 am

 

 

Limit | 28 people 
Cost | $25

A Libertine History?: Sex, Desire & LGBTQ Life in New Orleans

Walking tour

As historian Richard Clark notes in his Tulane University dissertation, City of Desire (2009), many elements of New Orleans culture—Mardi Gras, multiple costuming traditions, the rise of 20th-century tourism and entertainment industries—make the history of sexual expression in the city unique and sometimes uniquely open; while in other ways that history shares much with the rest of the United States, including anti-gay discrimination and violence. Before the 2016 massacre at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, the largest mass killing in the U.S. linked to anti-gay sentiment was a 1973 arson fire which killed 32 people at the Upstairs Lounge in New Orleans. Focusing both on LGBTQ experience and on histories of desire and sexual expression more generally this walking tour will explore entertainment and residential areas of the French Quarter and the adjacent Marigny neighborhood while also offering perspective on the history of sexuality in the city as a whole.


 

Friday, April 7
1:00 pm--5:00 pm

 

 

Limit | 45 people 
Cost | $50

New Orleans Black History Bus Tour

Bus tour with some walking

From the era of European colonialism, built largely on the labor of Africans, enslaved and free, the struggle for complete liberation by people of African descent has been central to New Orleans history since the city's founding. This tour, provided by Hidden History LLC, will acquaint you with an overview of greater Black New Orleans today. The tour highlights and showcases the life and struggle of the people. The attractions include workplaces, schools, universities, neighborhoods, artists, music and cuisine. With a focus on black liberation struggles of the 20th century, participants will visit historical stops such as the Homer A. Plessy marker, Dillard University, Ellis Marsalis Musical Center, the Lower Ninth Ward, devastated by the 2005 floods which followed Hurricane Katrina, William Frantz School where six-year old Ruby Bridges sought the right to attend a public school without racial barriers and New Zion Baptist Church where the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was founded.


 

Saturday, April 8
9:00 am--12:00 pm

 

 

Limit | 40 people
Cost | $40

Environmental History of a Perilous City

Bus tour with some walking

In New Orleans you are never far from the water or the water table. This tour will chronicle the long history of efforts to keep the water out of the city and its cemeteries, from natural drainage and wetlands at Spanish Fort, Bayou St. John, and Bayou Sauvage to the Canal Street cemeteries and the epic Bonnet Carré spillway, the first of the major "outlets" in today's flood protection system. While giving visitors a sense of the city's long struggles against inundation, natural and man-made, this tour will highlight the work of neighborhoods and communities to adapt to the environmental challenges of living in New Orleans.


 

Saturday, April 8
1:00 pm--4:00 pm

 

 

Limit | 40 people
Cost | $40

 

Jazz: the Lost, the Found, and the Archived

Bus tour with some walking

Travel from the places where jazz was born and played—in the neighborhoods and bars of the New Orleans—to the archive where it has been studied and preserved since 1958, the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane University. The driving portion of the tour will visit sites from Louis Armstrong's youth on South Rampart Street, the Dew Drop Inn, and the uptown homes of noted early jazz musicians King Oliver and Buddy Bolden, then make its way to the Hogan Archive. The archive has over 2,000 reels of oral history interviews and 70,000 recorded sound materials. Visitors will be able to see film footage of performances and tour the archive


Sunday, April 9
9:00 am--11:00 am
SOLD OUT 

Limit | 28 people
Cost | $25

Sites of the Trade: Antebellum New Orleans as Slavery's Hub

Walking tour

More men, women, and children were sold in the New Orleans slave markets between 1808 and 1862 than any other city in antebellum America. While most cities and towns confined the domestic slave trade to specific market structures, streets, or districts, New Orleans was home to more than 52 trading sites scattered across the city and ranging from taverns and dirt-strewn courtyards to ballrooms of luxury hotels. In this tour, participants will walk the city's urban landscape, from the levee to the warehouse district, from the French Quarter to the Marigny, in the footsteps of those forcibly separated from family and community and sold in the New Orleans markets.

Note: This tour covers approximately 3 miles on foot. There will be one stop for water and restrooms, at The Historic New Orleans Collection, which is located at 533 Royal Street in a complex built in 1792 by Jean-Francois Merieult, who dealt in wine, furniture, agricultural commodities, and enslaved people.

Sunday, April 9
1:00 pm-- 4:00 pm

Pre-registration required
Cost | Complimentary

OAH Educator's Day at the WWII Museum

Complimentary admission
The WWII Museum welcomes the OAH to New Orleans with free museum admission all day for OAH attendees and a special welcome for K-12 educators. A showing for all OAH attendees of Beyond All Boundaries, a 4-D journey through WWII in the Solomon Victory Theatre, will be followed by presentations and tours of their latest exhibits from the museum's Education staff in the U.S. Freedom Pavilion.