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Workshops

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Dual Enrollment, Advanced Placement, and the Future of the U.S. History Survey Course
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

Friday, April 7
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Cost: $25 | Limited to 40

Get Acquainted with National Endowment for the Humanities’ The Common Good Initiative: The Humanities in the Public Square

Friday, April 7
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
No pre-registration required

Designing More Effective Assignments
Endorsed  by the OAH Committee on Teaching

Friday, April 7
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
No pre-registration required

NPS 101 Workshop: National Parks as Historical Field Schools
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on NPS Collaboration

Saturday, April 8
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: $10 | Limited to 60

Reliving History in the Classroom / "Reacting to the Past" Workshop: Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty

Saturday, April 8
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Cost: $35 | Limited to 25

Grant Writers are Historians: Historians are Grant Writers
Solicited by the OAH CareerCOACH

Saturday, April 8
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Free | Pre-registration required

CANCELLED: K-12 Common Core History Skills: Writing Arguments
Endorsed by the History of Education Society (HES)

Saturday, April 8
Cancelled
No pre-registration required

FRIDAY, APRIL 7

Dual Enrollment and the Future of the U.S. History Survey Course

Solicited by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges
10:00 am–1:00 pm
Cost: $25 | Limited to 40 people

Since 2009, the OAH community college workshop at the annual conference has provided an opportunity for community college faculty to meet and explore issues of common interest. This year's workshop assesses the policies, debates, and implications of dual enrollment and advanced placement courses, with a particular focus on the role of community colleges.
While advanced placement courses are a familiar mainstay on most high school campuses, dual enrollment courses are expanding rapidly in many states. Also called concurrent enrollment or dual credit courses, the growth in dual enrollment is part of a wider effort to reduce the cost of higher education and to shorten the time to degree. Community colleges across the nation are engaging in conversations with K12 districts about dual enrollment and developing related policies and procedures that reflect their state laws and local circumstances. Students and parents appreciate the cost savings of dual enrollment as well as the opportunity for a head start on a college degree. Faculty, however, question the rigor of these courses taught on high school campuses. Many college and university administrators support dual enrollment programs on high school campuses in order to increase funding and shore up enrollments, yet this raises concerns about a marked decline in enrollment in the history survey courses offered on community college and university campuses. Another issue for consideration is the impact dual enrollment may have on well-established advanced placement programs.
10:00 am–10:15 am - Welcome
Christina Gold, Chair, OAH Community College Committee - El Camino College

10:15 am–11:45am - Perspectives on Dual Enrollment and Advanced Placement Programs
Chair: Theresa Jach, Houston Community College
Panelists:
• Tim McMannon, Dual Enrollment Instructor, Highline College, Des Moines, Washington.
• Dolores Davison, Secretary of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, History and Women's Studies Instructor at Foothill College
• Tai Edwards. National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships and Associate Professor, Johnson County Community College
• Amanda LaCerte, Director, Dual Enrollment Office, Baton Rouge Community College
• Lisa Norling, Department of History, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
• Sue Patrick, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Barron County


12:00 pm–1:00 pm - Lunch and Keynote Address
James Grossman, American Historical Associatioon
James Grossman is Executive Director of the American Historical Association. Formerly Vice President for Research and Education at the Newberry Library, he has taught at the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration and A Chance to Make Good: African-Americans, 1900-1929, and project director and coeditor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago (2005; online edition, 2006).

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Get Acquainted with National Endowment for the Humanities' The Common Good Initiative: The Humanities in the Public Square

2:00 pm–3:30 pm
No pre-registration required

Chair: Jeff Hardwick
Commentators: Jeff Hardwick; Ronald Williams II, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Panelists:
• Grace Delgado, University of California, Santa Cruz
• Robin Blackwood, Tucson Chinese Cultural Center
• Lily Balloffet, Western Carolina University

Are you and your community-based collaborators at the conceptual stages of a public history project? Or, alternatively, is your Humanities-in-the-Public-Square project in need of a little massaging before submission? Then this workshop on the latest NEH grant initiatives is designed for you. In 2015, in part to mark the fiftieth-year anniversary of the NEH, its newly-appointment Director, William Adams, launched The Common Good Initiative: The Humanities in the Public Square (CGI: HPS) to demonstrate the vital role that the humanities can play in American public life. The CGI: HPS urges humanities scholars and organizations to turn their attention and expertise to social issues that both resonate with the American public and that lend themselves to humanistic methods and concerns.
In this workshop, talk though different planning and writing stages of the CGI: HPS grant application with Jeff Hardwick, a Senior Program Officer in the Division of Public Programs for the NEH. Mr. Hardwick will offer insights into the grant writing process by commenting on two applications-in-progress: "Border Stories, Border Peoples: Finding Connection in Tucson's Neighborhoods" presented by Robin Blackwood from the Tucson Chinese Cultural Center and "Boom Years: Mapping Immigrant Diversity in Panamérica" presented by Dr. Lily Balloffet from the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies at North Carolina State University. Dr. Ronald Williams II, assistant professor of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will reflect on "Telling Our Stories of Home: Exploring and Celebrating Changing African Diaspora Communities," a 2016 CGI: HPS funded project. Dr. Williams will also share insights into the CGI: HPS review process and speak to the challenges of putting grant materials together. We will also address how to foster relationships with potential collaborators and identify appropriate humanities scholars in keeping with the CGI: HPS vision. In the end, participants will have the tools to work through, and surmount, various hurdles they may face on the way to final grant submission.
In preparation, please visit:

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Designing More Effective Assignments

Endorsed by the OAH Committee on Teaching
2:00 pm–4:00 pm
No pre-registration required

Presenter:
Mary Jo Festle, Elon University

In this two-hour workshop, participants will be introduced to principles for effective assignment design, be provided with time to work on a new assignment or revise an existing one, circulate their ideas, and serve as mutually supportive responders to other participants' assignments. We will discuss alignment, audience, preparation, practice, transparency, assessment, and reflection. The suggested practices are informed by recent work in the scholarship of teaching and learning, including Susan Ambrose, et al., How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching; the Transparency Project, multi-institution study that resulted in significant gains in student learning, including among underrepresented populations; and Walvoord and Johnson's book, Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment in College. It will be facilitated by a professor of history at a comprehensive university who also serves as an associate director of a center for teaching and learning.

Participants will need a laptop (or another way to access and read documents and create or adapt assignments).

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SATURDAY, APRIL 8

NPS 101 Workshop: National Parks as Historical Field Schools

Solicited by the OAH Committee on NPS Collaboration
9:00 am–10:00 am
Cost: $10 |Limited to 40 people

Chair: Ruth M. Alexander, Colorado State University
Panelists:
Seth Bruggeman, Temple University
Thomas Lekan, University of South Carolina
Michelle McClellan, University of Michigan
David C. Shelley, Old-Growth Bottomland Forest Research and Education Center Congaree National Park

This workshop explores creative ways in which historians have partnered with NPS sites to enrich classroom pedagogies. Students at the University of Michigan researched and drafted National Historic Landmark nominations for sites in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Illinois and presented them to the review board in Washington, DC. At Congaree National Park near Columbia, South Carolina, student researchers and public history interns from the University of South Carolina helped to identify and evaluate historic features and scholarly resources that speak to the entangled human and natural histories of wilderness areas. Interrelated class projects have helped map the park's historic land plats using GIS and explored storyboards as tools for communication. In Philadelphia, NPS and Temple University co-sponsor the ProRanger Program, wherein training for new law enforcement rangers includes an in-depth survey of NPS History.
Such partnerships train students in methods of historical inquiry while also introducing them to professional worlds of practice. Presenters will share information about how they identified partners and crafted course project and assignments; they will reflect on what worked, what didn't, and what they would do differently in the future. Participants will receive syllabi, assignments, reading lists, worksheets, and other materials to support partnerships between courses and NPS sites and offices. Other take-aways will include examples of partnership agreements/contracts, which codify the contributions and responsibilities of the university and national park site. Plus, examples of mini contracts, in which students assume certain responsibilities relative to one another, will be handed out.

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Reliving History in the Classroom / "Reacting to the Past" Workshop: Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty

9:00 am–12:00 pm
Cost: $35 |Limited to 25 people

Chair: Helen Gaudette, Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY
Panelists:
Jace Garrett Weaver, University of Georgia
Laura Adams Weaver, University of Georgia

Relive history by participating in a "Reacting to the Past" Workshop. Experience a mini-version of what can be a weekend, week, month, or semester-long learning project for your students. Reacting to the Past (RTTP) is a role- playing teaching strategy with a good list of ready-to-go titles and topics available for pre-college and college classrooms. The Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty" game is one example with clear relevance to the theme of Circulation and migration. Larry Carver, Director of the Liberal Arts Honors Programs, University of Texas at Austin, observes on the RTTP website "I have never seen students this engaged. They write more than the assignments require; everyone, shy or not, participates vigorously in the debates. They read important texts with real understanding, making complex arguments and ideas their own." The website also notes that "RTTP has been implemented at over 300 colleges and universities in the United States and abroad. The initiative is sustained by the Reacting Consortium, an alliance of colleges and universities that promotes imagination, inquiry, and engagement as foundational features of teaching and learning in higher education. The Consortium provides programs for faculty development and curricular change, including a regular series of conferences and workshops, online instructor resources, and consulting services."
"Reacting to the Past" games are used in a wide range of courses in undergraduate and some graduate programs; although some AP faculty have made use of Reacting games in high schools, the Reacting Consortium of colleges and universities, which governs the Reacting initiative, does not presently support pre-college applications. Mark C. Carnes, whose original concept was greatly expanded by an infusion of hundreds of faculty during the past decade, has completed a book on the pedagogy, called Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College. Our three-hour participatory session will demonstrate the various, creative, lively activities, which motivate students to closely read, analyze, and cite texts and primary sources. Participants in this session will receive roles, handbook, and reading materials after registration so that they can arrive ready to play the game. The session will close with a discussion of the value of the game as a history teaching strategy and an opportunity to ask questions about the incorporation of RTTP into your course of study or student life.

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Grant Writers are Historians: Historians are Grant Writers

Solicited by the OAH CareerCOACH
2:00 pm–4:00 pm
Complimentary |Pre-registration required

There are basic workshops throughout the nation for people wishing to improve their grant writing skills. Grant Writers are Historians: Historians are Grant Writers is a professional colloquy specifically designed to approach grant writing from the perspective of the historian. It builds upon the assumption that by virtue of experience and capacity for analysis, evaluation and creation, most historians are predisposed for grant writing through the ongoing refinement of their ability to present an informed argument. Taking that assumption a step further, this workshop begins its discussion on the premise that most historians are in possession of the specific analytical skill required for successful grant writing – the ability to contextualize important details.
Historians often write about the past in well-researched, purposeful and compelling ways and daily cultivate the imagination to determine why the acquisition, analysis and presentation of information about the past is extremely important to the greater good. Grant writing is simply a process on the "action" end of a potentially powerful financial collaboration: You and the potential grantor are using their chosen process to determine if as a team, the greater good will be served through their investment in what you want to do. They provide a written format for you to deliver the information necessary to make that determination.

Questions on a grant application are carefully crafted to draw out a response to a central theme: "Give the full picture of why your idea is important to the greater good" – a statement quite similar to the guiding question a professor poses to the history student about to embark on a research project. Crafting a grant narrative is much like responding to that worthy professor. Grant writers for history projects or programs are led along, question by question (now by a potential funder) to determine if we have any idea what we are talking about. Once that is determined, grant application questions attempt to determine why our project is important and if we are capable of holding up our end of the deal.
Topics of this two hour interactive workshop/discussion will include:

• Contextualizing the Contextual: An encouraging expansion of why professional historians often possess the insight to deduce the intentions of a grantor as well as the knowledge, imagination and skills to write a successful response.
• History and Sustainability: A discussion of how most grant questions are designed to determine how past and present circumstances eventually lead to your proposal. It examines how these questions enable grantors to determine if your organization has the ability to undertake and sustain the proposed project or program.
• Funding Entities: A discussion of what types of grant funding is available including a discussion of the significant differences between private, foundation and government grant sources. It examines a broad overview of the internal and external institutional expectations, permissions and the often quirky steps required for each – which appear absurd, yet after deeper examination, make sense from the standpoint of that organization.
• Frankenstein Proposals: An overview and breakdown of how best to manage a grant writing process including how to get ahead of and prevent potential barriers.
• NEA-RFP – Group Discussion: A sample driven discussion of a historically relevant and current National Endowment for the Humanities (NEA) Request for Proposals (RFP) and an explanation of universal proposal elements, including guidance on where to go both internally and externally if you need help. This will be the opportunity for individual questions and guidance on all grant processes, not only the NEA sample grant used for discussion.

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