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Luncheons

 

Maximize your time at the conference by visiting the concessions at the Sacramento Convention Center to pick up a coffee, quick snack, or lunch. The Center offers a full-service Starbucks for the duration of the conference, APizza on Thursday and Friday, and concessions will be available by the Exhibit Hall on Saturday.

 
Schedule Luncheons

Friday, April 13

11:30am-1 pm Women's Committee Luncheon: I am the Author of My Own Story': Collecting Gendered Narratives of the Working Class through the Art and Craft of Oral History
Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Luncheon: America First, Immigrants Last: American Xenophobia Then and Now

Saturday, April 14

11:30am-1 pm LAWCHA Luncheon & Annual Meeting: Remapping the History of American Radicalism
Independent Scholars Luncheon: The Independent Scholar’s Life:  Opportunities and Challenges
Women and Social Movements Luncheon

Descriptions

Women's Committee Luncheon: I am the Author of My Own Story': Collecting Gendered Narratives of the Working Class through the Art and Craft of Oral History

Solicited by the OAH Committee on the Status of Women in the Historical Profession
Limit 100 people | $50

Presenter: Virginia Espino, Moon Canyon Films

The Women's Committee Luncheon Speaker is Dr. Virginia Espino, who is affiliated with UCLA's Center for Oral History Research, is historian of California's Latino/a community, a public intellectual, and a documentary filmmaker who produced an oral history series on the Chicano/a movement in Los Angeles, and Emmy-nominated No Más Bebés, a film based on her research into the systemic and involuntary sterilization of Latinas at the Los Angeles-USC Medical Center. In 2016 the OAH awarded No Más Bebés the Erik Barnouw Award "in recognition of outstanding programming on television, or in documentary film, concerned with American history, the study of American history, and/or the promotion of American history."

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Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Luncheon: America First, Immigrants Last: American Xenophobia Then and Now 

Solicited by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (SHGAPE)
Limit 80 people | $50

Presenter: Erika Lee, University of Minnesota

Erika Lee is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor, the Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History, and the Director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of three award-winning books in U.S. immigration and Asian American history: At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration during the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943 (University of North Carolina Press, 2003), Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America (co-authored with Judy Yung, Oxford University Press, 2010), and most recently, The Making of Asian America: A History (Simon & Schuster, 2015, 2nd ed., 2016, Chinese version, 2018), which was the recipient of the 2015 Asian Pacific American Award for Literature from the American Library Association. It was an “Editor’s Choice” by the New York Times and named to the Best Nonfiction Books of 2015 list by Kirkus Reviews. She is currently working on a history of xenophobia in the United States. At the IHRC, she directs the Immigrant Stories digital storytelling and archiving project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and she co-organized the #ImmigrationSyllabus project.

SHGAPE is able to offer a limited number of luncheon tickets at a lower rate to graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. Please purchase the luncheon ticket at full prince and contact alwood@ilstu.edu before March 10 to receive a refund of the difference. Please note that all refunds will be issued after March 10.

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LAWCHA Luncheon & Annual Meeting: Remapping the History of American Radicalism

Solicited by the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)
Limit 80 people | $50

Presenter: James Gregory

Based on new insights from the online Mapping American Social Movements Project, this talk will reframe the history of the American left in two ways. First, by emphasizing that for most of the last century, radicalism in the US has been based in multiple social movements not electoral parties. This social movement left has been more discontinuous and more innovative than its counterparts in most countries and operates in different ways, achieving influence through alliances and through channels that have often involved the Democratic Party. Second, by exploring the nation’s political geography. The left has mattered in some places much more than others and radical geography has changed over time. By paying attention to the institutional dynamics and geographic complexity of this social movement left, we gain a fuller understanding of how it has operated and what it has accomplished over the past century.

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Independent Scholars Luncheon: The Independent Scholar’s Life:  Opportunities and Challenges

Limit 100 people | $50
Chair: Joan Zenzen, Independent Historian

Panelists:
• Joan Zenzen, Independent Historian
• Mark David Spence, HistoryCraft -- Oregon State University
• Susan Ferentinos, Public History Consultant
• Barbara Franco, Independent Scholar
• Becky Nicolaides, Affiliated Research Scholar, Huntington-USC Institute on California & the West and Research Affiliate, UCLA Center for the Study of Women
• Isabelle Flemming, National Coalition of Independent Scholars
• Arica Coleman, Independent scholar

The Independent Scholar’s Life:  Opportunities and Challenges

Independent scholars enjoy flexible work environments and the ability to pursue multiple research projects at once.  However, these virtues are often tempered with concerns about uneven income streams, access to research databases, and professional association. This keynote luncheon panel will feature historians who work as independent scholars, speaking candidly about the joys and frustrations of this their chosen careers, and offering insights on the importance of independent scholarship for the discipline of history. This keynote luncheon panel will address the following questions: 1) Why pursue a career as an  independent scholar? 2) How does the work of independent scholars differ from that of public historians?  3) What challenges do independent scholars face in gaining full access to research libraries?  How might Independent Scholars work with universities, the OAH, and other organizations to open access?  4) How do independent scholars enlarge and diversify the historical profession, and how might academia collaborate with and support the growing number of independent scholars?  5) What approaches and ethics do historians share, regardless of the venues in which they work?

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Women and Social Movements Luncheon

Co-editors, Tom Dublin & Kitty Sklar will introduce WASM's new editors!  And the new database, Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires.  The luncheon is free but places are limited.  To reserve, email tdublin@binghamton.edu.

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