OAH Home Donate to OAH Join the OAH

Meetings & Events


Workshops

 

Schedule Workshops

Thursday, April 12

2:45pm-4:15 Shaping San Francisco: The Forms of History

Friday, April 13

9am-12pm Teaching in a Partisan Era ($25 Admission, pre-registration required)
10am-11:30am Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher (pre-registration required)

Saturday, April 14

10am-11:30am The HistoryMakers VJ Mixtape: Presenting Traditional Oral History in an Innovative Digital Form (pre-registration required)
10am-11:30am Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher (pre-registration required)

Descriptions

Shaping San Francisco: The Forms of History

Endorsed by the Western History Association

The technological and social trajectory of Shaping San Francisco is a living laboratory demonstrating a variety of contemporary forms in which history is made. We collect and archive primary sources on Foundsf.org along with excerpts from books and original essays, thereby doing double duty as both a repository of historical materials for future historians as well as an interpretive site for understanding how we arrived at this juncture. We also produce two seasons annually of Public Talks and walking and bicycle tours. This demonstration workshop will convene a critical discussion to illuminate and challenge the limits of the project.

Some of the questions we hope to discuss are:
1. The role of “amateur” history production vs. that done by “professionals.”
2. Journalism as the first draft of history—mainstream newspapers and neighborhood newspapers
3. Objectivity and neutrality in history production: false goals?
4. Browsing as narration, and the loss of coherence.
5. If multiple points of view, multiple voices are the proper way to frame historical information is there a role for the Grand Narrative?
6. Curriculum standards and public history—inevitable conflict?

Chair: Chris Carlsson, Shaping San Francisco

Panelists:
• Chris Carlsson, Shaping San Francisco
• LisaRuth Elliott, co-director, Shaping San Francisco/Foundsf.org

Back to top

Teaching in a Partisan Era

Solicited by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges
Cost: $25 | Limited to 40 people

 All of us have dealt with partisanship throughout our careers, but the recent election, advent of fake news, and hardening and broadening of media along partisan lines has made it increasingly challenging for teachers and professors to deal with controversial material. Yet, deal with it we must, since controversy is inherent in teaching meaningful history. 
Panelists will present and discuss their creative lectures, lessons and activities that use history to focus on filtering information or recognizing bias, or help to put this hyper-partisan era of fragmented media in historical perspective. 
The panel will include 3-4 presenters a Q & A session and lunch with a keynote speaker.

Chair: Cameron Addis, Austin Community College
Presenters:
Traversing Partisanship and Teaching Peace and Justice in the US History Survey
Andrew Barbero, Pensacola State College
In this era of partisanship, many well established topics and themes presented in US history survey courses have become newly charged with political controversy. As both consumers of mass culture, and members of America’s body politic, students have been inundated with ideological rhetoric. Once more, such rhetoric is often saturated in historical jargon. For instructors this not only makes navigating the traditional curriculum more difficult, it obstructs our ability to present matters related to peacemaking, social justice, and political dissent to our students as valid components of American history.
As an instructor at a state college tasked primarily with teaching US survey courses, I have worked to develop teaching methods and practices that help me to better transverse partisan divides within my classroom. As a specialist in US movements for peace and social justice moreover, I have been able to use these same pedagogical practices to instill upon my students the valuable roll that activism and peacemaking have played in our shared history as Americans. In this paper I intend to explain these methods, as well as the resources and assessment tools associated with them. These include a focus on the debate about the limits of civil liberty and national security, an emphasis on history from the bottom-up, and the incorporation of various primary sources that help to both promote critical thinking, and apprise students about the abilities of everyday individuals like themselves.

 

Fiction v Facts: Juxtaposing the Media, Hollywood, and Oral Histories to Uncover the “Truth” Behind Warfare
Lynne Nelson Manion
This paper showcases how faculty from two community colleges collaborated across the disciplines to engage history students to think about the fictionalized portrayal of war. Using the Vietnam war as portrayed in the novel The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien as its starting point, faculty members asked students to examine various accounts of warfare----Hollywood films, comedic skits, television shows, popular music, social media etc.----and juxtapose those “fictionalized accounts” against the politics of what really happened. To ascertain the “truth” about warfare, students conducted and examined oral histories with real soldiers who fought in Vietnam and the various present-day Gulf conflicts. Students then examined primary documents---such as soldier’s letters, newspaper accounts, speeches from politicians from the 1960s to present day, and various media outlets---to decipher inconsistencies between the reality and perception of warfare. Lastly, students were asked to discuss the role of “fake news” and fiction in creating the historical record and the problems this creates for the historian and the public at large.

O’Brien, a former journalist turned novelist, was a perfect individual to use as a framework to understand the tenuous connection between politics, entertainment, reality, perception, fact and fiction. This paper includes a description of how the project was structured, details the various types of “entertainment” students examined, and provides survey results from students regarding the use of fact and fiction to understand warfare. In addition, four students had an extended conversation with the project faculty regarding their experiences with the novel, popular culture, the media, their own experiences as soldiers, and the project itself; their stories are shared in the paper. Finally, the paper discusses the faculty member’s perceptions of the project’s outcomes, including the use of alternative assessments (non-traditional essay assignments, multi-media presentations, etc.) for students to present and support a thesis regarding the role of “entertainment” in the historical record.

Campus Climate: Red and Blue Together
Elizabeth Hohl, Fairfield University
This case study is based upon a university situated in a blue state among red towns with a student body that reflects those political divisions. Partisanship inside and outside of the classroom presents a special set of challenges to untenured and contingent faculty. Those of us teaching “multicultural” history, fostering dialogue on social justice and facing controversial speakers navigate additional minefields as at will employees. In many ways however, the current political climate reveals pre-existing tensions that now more than ever, underscore the need for teaching history in all of its complexity.

Lunch Keynote: David E. Shi,

David E. Shi, former President of Furman University, is a specialist in intellectual and cultural history. In addition to numerous essays, his books include Matthew Josephson, Bourgeois Bohemian (Yale University Press, 1980), The Simple Life: Plain Living and High Thinking in American Culture (Oxford University Press, 1985), which was a History Book Club selection, and Facing Facts: Realism in American Thought and Culture, 1850-1920 (Oxford University Press, 1994). He is also co-author, with the late George B. Tindall, of the best-selling textbook America: a Narrative History (W. W. Norton). Professor Shi served at the chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. Among his numerous awards, he received the 2003 Presidential Leadership Award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Admission price: $25

Back to top

Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher

Solicited by OAH CareerCoach

During this workshop, you'll learn to:

  • determine if a book is the right publishing option for you
  • identify the publishers which can best serve your goals
  • create a book proposal that highlights your expertise and the unique features of your research
  • craft a cover letter that captures an editor's attention

Melody Herr is a seasoned publishing professional with more than 16 years of experience as an acquiring editor for university presses and a reputation for a personal touch. She has coached authors working in fields ranging from political science, law, and international relations to regional history, legal history, and general US history. An author herself, she has published nonfiction and historical fiction for young readers as well as scholarly work. Currently, she serves as Head of the Office of Scholarly Communications at the University of Arkansas where she continues to serve researchers and scholars in diverse fields. 

Presenter:
• Melody Herr, University of Arkansas

Back to top

The HistoryMakers VJ Mixtape: Presenting Traditional Oral History in an Innovative Digital Form

Solicited by the HistoryMakers

Innovative uses of digital archives are the driving force behind a new wave of public history, and The HistoryMakers Digital Archive is leading that charge. In this workshop, participants will be given an overview of The HistoryMakers unique life oral history interview format by Founder & Executive Director Julieanna Richardson, as well as a look into the methods used in training The HistoryMakers interviewers. In addition, real world examples of the Digital Archive’s uses in teaching and scholarship will be provided by professors currently employing it in their classrooms. Workshop participants will be guided through an exploration of the Digital Archive, which combines traditional oral history and state of the art technology to present history in a more engaging form, and will be allowed to create their own “VJ Mixtape” – a curated playlist of interview segments from the Digital Archive around a chosen topic or theme. Mixtapes on policing in America, reflections on African American experiences with the Classics, the transformative power of reading as a learning tool, and intersectionality in the lives of black women have already been created by scholars and will be available for workshop participants to view.

Presenters:
• Julieanna Richardson, The HistoryMakers
• Marcia Walker-McWilliams, Rice University

Back to top


Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher

Solicited by OAH CareerCoach

During this workshop, you'll learn to:

  • determine if a book is the right publishing option for you
  • identify the publishers which can best serve your goals
  • create a book proposal that highlights your expertise and the unique features of your research
  • craft a cover letter that captures an editor's attention

Melody Herr is a seasoned publishing professional with more than 16 years of experience as an acquiring editor for university presses and a reputation for a personal touch. She has coached authors working in fields ranging from political science, law, and international relations to regional history, legal history, and general US history. An author herself, she has published nonfiction and historical fiction for young readers as well as scholarly work. Currently, she serves as Head of the Office of Scholarly Communications at the University of Arkansas where she continues to serve researchers and scholars in diverse fields. 

Presenter:
• Melody Herr, University of Arkansas

Back to top