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Workshops

Sessions Workshops Meals Tours Features Exhibits Info

n Sunday Workshops

Thursday, April 4
2:45 pm-4:15 pm
no pre-registration required
Record Linkage and the Use of Big Data in Historical Research
Solicited by the Economic History Association
Friday, April 5
8:00 am-9:30 am
no pre-registration required
"Writing" Oral History
Solicited by the Oral History Association
8:00 am-9:30 am
no pre-registration required
Applying for Jobs at Teaching Institutions: So What Else can you Teach?
Solicited by the OAH Membership Committee
8:30 am-11:30 am
Cost: $10 | Limited to 40 people
Overcoming the Online Divide: Connection and Engagement Strategies to Promote a Vibrant Online Classroom
Solicited by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges
Saturday, April 6
8:30 am-11:30 am
Complimentary | Limited to 60 people
Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher
10:00 am-11:30 am
no pre-registration required
Fluidity in Freedom: African Americans in Colonial and Revolutionary America
1:00 pm-3:00 pm
Complimentary | Limited to 60 people
Adding "Humanities Grantwriter" to Your Professional Qualifications
Sunday, April 7
Various Times
Application required (not available during registration)
Graduate, Adjunct, and Independent Scholars Workshops and
Public Voice Workshops for Historians

Descriptions

Record Linkage and the Use of Big Data in Historical Research

Solicited by the Economic History Association
no pre-registration required
#AM2892

As more large historical datasets become digitized, linking individuals across these datasets is becoming a powerful tool for historical research in the social sciences and the humanities. This workshop will provide an overview of the main techniques used to link historical records. Both hand linking and automated machine learning techniques will be covered. We will also discuss the key historical datasets available for linking and the specific benefits and drawbacks of using each of those datasets.

Chair: John Parman, College of William & Mary
Panelists:
• James Feigenbaum, Boston University
• Brian Beach, College of William & Mary

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"Writing" Oral History

Solicited by the Oral History Association
no pre-registration required
#AM3170

The Oral History Review, the field’s flagship journal published by the Oral History Association, shares original research focused on the practice, methodologies, theories, and pedagogy of oral history, while reflecting its interdisciplinary nature. Oral history relies on technology to process, archive, and disseminate interviews. Widespread availability of digital media profoundly augments the aurality of oral history, allowing for more direct engagement with the primary texts of the field – the recordings themselves. Digital technologies also change what “writing” with oral history looks like. This roundtable with OHR’s editorial team explores how oral history provides historians with new ways of approaching topics, particularly how writing with oral history elucidates memory, voice, and emotion.

The Oral History Review, the field’s flagship journal published by the Oral History Association, shares original research focused on the practice, methodologies, theories, and pedagogy of oral history, while reflecting its interdisciplinary nature. Oral history relies on technology to process, archive, and disseminate interviews. Widespread availability of digital media profoundly augments the aurality of oral history, allowing for more direct engagement with the primary texts of the field – the recordings themselves. Digital technologies also change what “writing” with oral history looks like. This roundtable with OHR’s editorial team explores how oral history provides historians with new ways of approaching topics, particularly how writing with oral history elucidates memory, voice, and emotion.

Panelists:
• David Caruso
• Abigail Perkiss, Oral History Review, Kean University
• Janneken Smucker, Oral History Review/ West Chester University

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Applying for Jobs at Teaching Institutions: So What Else Can You Teach?

Solicited by the OAH Membership Committee
no pre-registration required
#AM3105

Intended for graduate students, post-doctoral job applicants, and doctoral faculty, this session offers academic job application insights from the perspective of teaching-intensive institutions, where the vast majority of hires occur. This session covers:

• Positioning yourself, during and after graduate school, to be competitive for jobs at teaching institutions, and optimizing your c.v. for these jobs
• Decoding job ads and researching websites at teaching institutions
• Crafting a cover letter that aims at a teaching institution’s priorities
• Writing an attractive teaching statement
• Achieving a balance between teaching and research in an initial interview
• Successful teaching demonstrations and other aspects of campus interviews

Chair: Rebecca Noel, Plymouth State University
Panelists:
• Rebecca Noel, Plymouth State University
• Elizabeth Duclos-Orsello, Salem State University
• Elizabeth De Wolfe, University of New England

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Overcoming the Online Divide: Connection and Engagement Strategies to Promote a Vibrant Online Classroom

Solicited by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges
Pre-registration Required
Cost: $10 | Limited to 40 people
#AM3160

The recent upswing in online learning has created a new avenue for colleges and universities to attract students, many of whom may not otherwise be able to pursue their educational goals. Online courses offer students the convenience of being able to complete their coursework off hours, and without having to regularly travel to a college campus. For instructors however, this means that we must completely restructure our courses, and rethink our traditional teaching methods to ensure that we are providing a rigorous and interactive experience. This workshop is intended to provide participants with specific tools and strategies designed to help meet these challenges, as well as foster a vibrant and engaging online experience for their students.

Panelists will each present and discuss their own creative methods, lesson plans, and activities followed by a question and answer session.

Chair: Andrew Barbero, Pensacola State College

Making the Personal Connection: Engaging with Instructor Videos & Discussion Boards in the Online College Classroom
Ira Benjamins, San Jacinto College - North

Overcoming Myths and Addressing Challenges to Create a Dynamic and Sustainable Online History Course
Tracy Davis, Victor Valley College

Game of Secession Remix
Susanna Lee, North Carolina State University

It’s ok to fail. Not only is failure an option, failure is an expected outcome at some point this semester. Do not panic
James Ross-Nazzal, Houston Community College

Keynote presentation: Jane Dailey, University of Chicago

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Crafting Your Book Proposal and Attracting a Publisher 

Pre-registration required
Complimentary | Limited to 60 people
#AM3172

During this session, you will learn to:

  • determine if a book is the right publishing option for you
  • identify the publishers which can best serve your goals
  • create a book proposal that highlights your expertise and the unique features of your research
  • craft a cover letter that captures an editor's attention

A veteran acquiring editor, Melody Herr, PhD, has more than 16 years of experience working for scholarly publishers – including Johns Hopkins University Press and the University of Michigan Press – and a reputation for a personal touch. Over the course of her career, Melody has coached authors in political science, legal studies, and U.S. history. Currently, she serves as Head of the Office of Scholarly Communications at the University of Arkansas. An author herself, she has published nonfiction and historical fiction for young readers as well as scholarly work. Her most recent book is Writing and Publishing Your Book: A Guide for Experts in Every Field (Greenwood, 2017).

Presenter:
• Melody Herr, University of Arkansas

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Fluidity in Freedom: African Americans in Colonial and Revolutionary America 

no pre-registration required
#AM3118

A crucial feature of the American character- the notion of freedom - is so entrenched in the cultural and national consciousness that often the evolution of this notion is taken for granted. Students of history miss a foundational understanding of the American value of freedom when they are unaware of how it has been transformed, defined and expanded by agents of history.

Join education staff from the National Museum of African American History and Culture to investigate the fluidity of freedom in the Colonial and Revolutionary periods through the material culture and legal history of people of African descent who utilized the courts to claim the freedom they believed was due to them. Specifically using the stories of individuals such as Elizabeth Freeman (Mum Bett), Quock Walker and Rachel Findlay, we will explore the arguments for universal freedom, the development of race as a factor in freedom and the role of the legal system in expanding the concept of freedom.

Designed for educators of grades 3-12, this workshop will enhance content knowledge, provide resources for the classroom and open a discussion about the nature of freedom and race in the fledgling United States.

Chair and Presenter: Candra Flanagan, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution

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Adding "Humanities Grantwriter" to your Professional Qualifications

Pre-registration required
Complimentary | Limited to 60 people
#AM3187

Grant proposal submission can be considered the professional equivalent to completing a term research project and paper for a history course. With that in mind, this workshop is presented under the assumption that most post-graduate historians already possess the most important skills required to submit a competitive grant proposal.

This professional workshop will specifically address the few remaining skills required to write humanities grants through a discussion of 1) grant writing terminology, 2) how to identify and/or contextualize potential funders, 3) the basic and typical meanings and purposes behind common grant application questions and requirements, 4) where to find applicable assistance with institutional documentation, grant policies and financial expertise within your own organization, university or professional circle.

After a brief overview of how the historian’s skillset is consistent with the particular expertise required by the grant writing professional, we will engage in activities targeting the more detailed features of a grant proposal. This active, discussion-based workshop led by Lori Shea Kuechler will:

• Elaborate upon how to respond to the distinctive vernaculars of various disciplines, foundations and funding entities (museology, humanities, archival studies, social science, government agencies, non-profit culture) and remain true to your goals and objectives.

• Deconstruct one currently posted Request for Proposals (RFP), through the categorization and identification of its primary elements, and will contextualize what the funder is asking for – and why.

• Will address the significance of the vocabulary, terminology and perspective unique to the humanities granting sphere(s) of influence.

• Address how to create and lead a grant team, and grant proposal work plan for your department or organization.

All references and resources used within the workshop will be from the public domain, and will continue to be highly accessible to attendees as long as they are available to the public.

Presenter:
• Lori Kuechler