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NEH Summer Institute - Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

Join us for this in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. This four-week NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers will bring the rich and diverse histories of America’s public museums into wider use for teaching and research in the humanities. The Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy, sustainability, and cultural heritage. 

The Institute will be co-directed by Professor Karen Bassi, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and Dr. Gretchen Henderson, Georgetown University and UCSC. Weekly lectures and seminars will be led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today. 

Individuals selected to participate will receive a $3,300 stipend. These taxable stipends are intended to help cover travel expenses to and from the project location, books and other research expenses, and living expenses for the duration of the period spent in residence at Georgetown University.

Application Deadline is March 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 13, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: 2019 Florida Conference of Historians

The Florida Conference of Historians (FCH) invites proposals for its 59th annual meeting on February 22-23, 2019 at New College of Florida, located in beautiful Sarasota. Faculty, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome. The organization's name reflects the geographic location of its annual meeting and does not reflect any limitation on subject matter. Organizers are accepting proposals on any and all areas of historical inquiry in the following categories: Individual papers, Panels, Posters, and Media/Film

Important Deadlines:
Proposals are due by December 15, 2018 (new extended deadline!)
Hotel reservations at the conference rate are due by January 15, 2019
Advance registration deadline is February 15, 2019

Those who present individual papers at the annual meeting may submit their work to the FCH Annals: Journal of the Florida Conference of Historians, the organization's peer-reviewed journal. Papers published in the journal are eligible to compete for prizes in several categories: the Thomas M. Campbell Award (professional level, including faculty and independent scholars), the Blaine T. Blaine Browne Award (graduate student level), and the J. Calvitt Clarke III Award (undergraduate student level). The FCH annual meeting also features several special events, such as local tours, a poster session, film screenings, a banquet, and a keynote address. Attending the sessions is free and open to the public! 

Hosted by New College of Florida, the annual meeting provides a unique opportunity to explore Florida's southwest region and participate in one of the nation’s most rewarding regional history conferences!

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 12, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Labour in History & Economics Conference Call for Papers

The transformation of work and concepts of labour, the movement of workers within and between countries, and changes in how people obtain work are significant trends in many contemporary economies. While they may appear to be new developments, these processes have historical roots and precedents. With the increasing use of historical data in economics and the return of labour to the forefront of economic history, the time is ripe for discussion and collaboration between labour historians, economic historians, and labour economists. 

The empirical turn in economics has led to new research related to labour and work including the use of historical case studies. At the same time, the high-wage economy interpretation of the Industrial Revolution has put workers and wages at the forefront of economic history, and historians of capitalism have advanced the importance of labour repression, especially slavery, as a cause of modern economic growth. The Oxford Conference on Labour in History and Economics will bring together scholars from these disciplines to share research, perspectives, and methodologies.

We seek papers that speak to both the scholar’s discipline and to colleagues in the other disciplines, preferably touching on the themes of migration, regulation, and the work environment. For example, we hope to see papers from economists which use historical data or engage themes relevant to economic history and/or labour history. Economic history papers may use econometric and/or qualitative methods to link with either or both of the other disciplines. Submissions on labour history might incorporate ideas from labour economics and economics more generally, or speak to persistent themes in the social sciences. Papers that discuss issues of intersectionality, including race, gender, and class, are encouraged, and we welcome submissions that study female, child, and non-white labourers.

Scholars interested in presenting at the conference are asked to send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a brief (1–2 page) CV to oxfordlabourconference@gmail.com by 14 December 2018. Co-authored papers are welcomed, and we strongly encourage submissions from graduate students and researchers from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. The conference will be held in Oxford, UK from April 15–16, 2019.

For further information, click here>> 

Posted: November 8, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Missouri Humanities Symposium: Humanities & Democracy

Humanities & The Future Symposium: Humanities and Democracy
The Missouri Humanities Council
Friday, March 22 

CFP Submission deadline: Friday, December 7.

How do the Humanities help us to understand Democracy? The Missouri Humanities Council will be holding its second annual Midwest “Humanities & The Future” Symposium to explore this question. Symposium events will take place at Drury University in Springfield, Missouri on Friday, March 22 & Saturday, March 23. All panels will take place on Friday, March 22.

We are seeking papers for three panels that will take place on Friday, March 22. Each interdisciplinary panel in the Humanities will be devoted to one of three themes: 1) Rights, 2) Conflict, and 3) Negotiation.

We are at the cusp of a series of historical markers for democracy nationally, globally, and here in the Midwest. The year 2019 will mark 100 years since the Treaty of Versailles and the formation of the League of Nations. The following year, 2020, will mark the centennial for Women’s Suffrage. The two-hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the twenty-fourth state to enter the United States will take place in 2021. Finally, in just a few years, in 2024, we will come to the one-hundred-year anniversary of 1924 Indian Citizenship Act, a year that will also mark the sixty-year anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. These anniversaries serve as key reminders that democracy is a process, one that is always in motion, sometimes fraught, often exciting, and always in need of collaborative thinking. 

Humanities & The Future will gather people from the Midwest who work in, study, and teach the Humanities to think anew about how the Humanities help us to understand democracy both locally and globally. How might we engage with memoir, film, historical novels, historical documents, speeches, and famous debates both in the past and now to help us better understand the ways in which democracies can, do, and should work? How do records of the human experience, in a wide array of forms, help us to imagine past key historical moments and possible new futures for democracy? We welcome submissions from across the Humanities that deal with a broad range of texts and ideas related to Rights, Conflict, and Negotiation in the context of democracy. 

To submit an abstract for consideration, please follow these guidelines:
• Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words
• In the beginning of your abstract, include an overview of the subject of study in your paper 
• Keep in mind that the audience for this event will be mixed: students, faculty, those who work in Humanities professions, and interested members of the public are invited to attend the Symposium
• Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes
• Include a one-page CV
• Send your abstract and CV to Dr. Katie Gilbert at katie@mohumanities.org 
• Submission deadline is Friday, December 7.

Note: The Missouri Humanities Council is able to assist with travel costs for panelists. We are also able to pay a $100 honorarium for your work. 

The keynote speaker for the Symposium is Dr. John Inanzu, Sally D. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Law & Religion at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches criminal law, religion and law, and various First Amendment courses. He writes and speaks frequently to general audiences on topics of pluralism, assembly, free speech, religious freedom, and other issues. 

Inazu is the author of Liberty's Refuge: The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly (Yale, 2012) and Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference (Chicago, 2016). 

The Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri is a co-sponsor of this year’s keynote address.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Funding to attend Vernacular Architecture Forum, Philadelphia, 2019: Students

AMBASSADOR AWARDS: The VAF Ambassador Awards provide funding for student groups (undergraduate and graduate) from North American institutions, with a faculty sponsor, to attend VAF's annual conference. 

A selection committee will choose winning recipients based on the strength of the proposals, considering especially the goals of the award program outlined above. The amount of money awarded to each program is at the discretion of the selection committee, but shall depend on such factors as the distance needed to travel to the annual conference site, the number of students involved, the number of Award applicants, and the funds available to the Award program. The total Award amount per institution is limited to $2500 with a maximum of $500 per student. We encourage, but do not require, that Ambassadors apply for matching funds from their institutions.

During the conference, Award recipients are encouraged to use social media to communicate with a broader audience about their experiences as a participant in the conference. Following conference attendance, Award recipients are expected to act as "ambassadors" for the VAF, working to promote the study, documentation, and preservation of ordinary buildings and landscapes. Each group of Ambassadors must also submit a written summary of its experiences to the fellowship chair. The summary, as well as a group photograph, will be published in the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s newsletter. Schools awarded an Ambassadors Award in 2011 or thereafter will not be eligible for an award the following academic year.

For application instructions please click here>>

DEADLINE FOR 2019: JANUARY 5, 2019
 

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Grants


Funding to attend Vernacular Architecture Forum, Philadelphia, 2019: First Time Attendee

ACCESS AWARD: In an effort to bring fresh voices to the study of vernacular buildings and landscapes the Access Award supports first-time attendance by scholars and students with limited professional exposure to the fields of architectural history and vernacular studies, as well as by practitioners and independent scholars in the field. The next meeting, Landscapes of Succession, will take place in Philadelphia, PA, May 29 - June 1, 2019. 


There is no geographic restriction on the award and local practitioners, scholars, and students may apply. Winners are not required to give a paper at the meeting, although they may. The award will cover the cost of registration for the conference including tours. Winners who live more than 50 miles from the conference site will also receive a stipend of $300 for travel and lodging, to be presented at the conference. Up to two awards will be given per year. Winners are required to write an article to be published in the VAF’s newsletter, VAN, discussing what they learned as first-time attendees.


The deadline for applications is January 5, 2019.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Grants


Fellowship Opportunity at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
Crystal Bridges Museum and the Tyson Scholars Program encourages and supports scholarship that seeks to expand boundaries or traditional categories of investigation into American art. Crystal Bridges invites applications addressing a variety of topics including art history, American studies, craft, architecture, visual and material culture, Indigenous art, Latin American art, American studies, and contemporary art. Projects with an interdisciplinary focus are particularly encouraged. 

The program is open to scholars holding a PhD (or equivalent experience) as well as to PhD candidates. Applicants may be affiliated with a university, museum, or independent. Scholars will be selected on the basis of their potential to advance understanding of American art and to intersect meaningfully with aspects of Crystal Bridges’ collections, architecture, or landscape. 

To support their research, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Housing is provided at the Crystal Bridges Farmhouse, within easy walking distance from the Museum via wooded trails and approximately 1.5 miles from downtown Bentonville. Scholars have private bed and bathrooms in the house, and share comfortable indoor and outdoor common spaces including an expansive yard, patio, and swimming pool. In addition to housing, Scholars are provided office or carrel space in the curatorial wing of Crystal Bridges’ Library. 

Stipends vary depending on the duration of residency, and position as senior scholar, post-doctoral scholar, or pre-doctoral scholar and range from $15,000 to $30,000 per semester. Additional funds for relocation are provided, and research travel funds are available during the residency upon application. 

Further information about the Tyson Scholars Program, application instructions, and application portal can be found here>> 

Applicants are encouraged to contact Crystal Bridges’ curators and librarians in advance for specific information about the Museum’s collection related to their research. The application deadline for residency between August 2019 and mid-May 2020 is January 15, 2019. 

About Crystal Bridges:
Opened to the public on November 11, 2011, Crystal Bridges was founded in 2005 by philanthropist Alice Walton. Crystal Bridges’ permanent collection spans five centuries of American art ranging from the Colonial era to the current day. It has particular strengths in colonial through early twentieth century painting and a growing collection of post-war and contemporary art in all media. Crystal Bridges’ research library consists of approximately 60,000 volumes as well as significant manuscript and ephemera holdings. The library also houses a comprehensive collection of American color-plate books from the nineteenth century.

The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program supports full-time scholarship in the history of American art and visual and material culture from the colonial period to the present. The program was established in 2012 through a $5 million commitment from the Tyson family and Tyson Foods, Inc. Since its inception, the Tyson Scholars program has supported the work of 20 scholars, attracting academic professionals in a variety of disciplines from across the country.

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies Grant Application

The Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies (BIAAS) seeks grant proposals for projects aimed at promoting an understanding of the historic relationship between the United States and Austria (including Habsburg Austria) in the fields of history, politics, economics, law, cultural studies, and public history. Grants may include support for related lectures, seminars, workshops, conferences, exhibits, publications, podcasts, and documentaries. Salary replacement and/or tuition are not eligible. Grants will not exceed $25,000 unless a compelling case is made for a larger grant. Grant recipients in academia are encouraged to submit an article from grant research to be considered for publication in the Institute’s Journal of Austrian-American History. 

Grant applications must be submitted by March 1, 2019. Applicants will be notified of the results of their applications in June 2019. Grants will be distributed before September 1, 2019, with the grant award period beginning on September 1, 2019, and ending on August 31, 2020. A final report will be due within ninety days after the completion date of the award period.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 1, 2018
Tagged: Grants


Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies Fellowship Application

The Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies (BIAAS) is accepting applications for the Botstiber Fellowship in Austrian-American Studies. The fellowship will be awarded to a scholar or professional who seeks funds for a project that promotes an understanding of the historic relationship between the United States and Austria (including Habsburg Austria) in the fields of history, politics, economics, law, cultural studies, and public history. A grant of up to $30,000 will be considered for support for research, travel, salary replacement, or other necessary expenses. Fellowship recipients are encouraged to submit articles produced from fellowship research to be considered for publication in the Institute’s Journal of Austrian-American History.

Fellowship applications must be submitted by March 1, 2019. Applicants will be notified of the results of their applications in June 2019. Fellowships will be distributed before September 1, 2019, with the fellowship award period beginning on September 1, 2019, and ending on August 31, 2020. A final report will be due within ninety days after the completion date of the award period.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 1, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Long-Term Fellowships at the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Howard H. Peckham Long-Term Fellowship on Revolutionary America supports research on American history between 1764 and 1812. The fellowship provides $10,000 for a project involving a residence of two months or longer at the Library. This is a post-doctoral fellowship requiring a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at time of application. 

Norton Strange Townshend Fellowship offers $10,000 in support of scholarly research on diversity, equity and inclusion in American history during the nineteenth century. Successful applicants are expected to spend a minimum of two months at the Clements. This is a post-doctoral fellowship that requires a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at the time of application. 

Earhart Fellowships on American History offer $10,000 for scholarly research on any aspect of American history prior to 1901. Successful applicants are expected to spend a minimum of two months at the Clements. This is a post-doctoral fellowship that requires a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at the time of application. 

Reese Fellowship in the Print Culture of the Americas encourages research in the history of the book and other print formats, bibliography, and other aspects of print culture in America, including publishing and marketing, from the sixteenth century to 1900. The Reese Fellowship provides $5,000 to support one month of in-residence study in the Clements Library collections. This is a post-doctoral fellowship requiring a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at time of application.

Applications must be received by January 15 for research to be undertaken in that calendar year.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: October 31, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Short-Term Fellowships at the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Short-term fellowships of $1,000 requiring a minimum visit of one week are available in the following categories:

Jacob M. Price Visiting Research Fellowships offer support for graduate students and junior faculty researching any topic of American history that is supported by the collections. 

Fellowship for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in American supports research by graduate students or junior faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities who are undertaking a research project that examines topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion or who demonstrate a commitment to diversity in the field of American History. 

Mary G. Stange Fellowship supports research by graduate students, faculty, or independent researchers working on any topic supported by the collections. Unique projects are encouraged. 

Richard & Mary Jo Marsh Fellowship offers $1,000 to support graduate students, faculty, or independent researchers working on any topic supported by the collections. 

Brian Leigh Dunnigan Fellowship in the History of Cartography is open to graduate students, faculty, and independent researchers working on any topic supported by the cartographic collections. 

Howard H. Peckham Short-Term Fellowship on Revolutionary America supports research on American history between 1764 and 1812. This is a post-doctoral fellowship requiring a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at time of application. 

Applications must be received by January 15 for research to be undertaken in 2019.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: October 31, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


In Memoriam: John Drane Milligan (1924-2018)

Professor John Milligan, a longtime member of the University at Buffalo History Department, passed away on July 8 in his 94th year. Professor Milligan will be remembered by many generations of history students for his engaging courses on the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction as well as on race, slavery, and historiography and theory in history. He will also be remembered for his consistent support for high standards of instruction that sought to engage students in caring about moral issues, when and where they presented themselves in the study of the past. 

Students had no stronger advocate during the years of Milligan’s presence in the UB History Department. A man of strong but disciplined and understated social and political commitments, Milligan was able to convey his concerns for the world and the place of History in the efforts to improve the world without ever insisting that the price for gaining his respect and affection was that students or colleagues had to agree with him. Young faculty members had no better exemplar for conducting themselves with restraint than John, who was by example, rather than preaching, a very effective mentor.

John Milligan was born in New York City, but like his father, Carl Glover Milligan, who graduated with an Engineering degree in 1896, sought his education in the Midwest at the University of Michigan. After service in the Caribbean in the Army Air Corps in World War II guarding the Panama Canal, like many returning veterans Milligan was well into his twenties when he received his B.A. in 1952 and his M.A. in 1953. He went on receive his doctorate at Michigan in 1961, serving as a teaching fellow for two years while engaged in research on his dissertation, supervised by Dwight L. Dumond and Sidney Fine. 

The influence of his mentor Professor Dumond, who devoted his career to study of the antislavery movement, was particularly apparent. Dumond himself had studied under U.B. Phillips, a prodigious scholar who left a most complicated legacy. Very unlike Phillips, Dumond insisted on recognizing that the condition of African Americans “always provided the acid test of American democracy.”

Milligan came to UB in 1962, and taught consistently until his retirement over four decades later. His dissertation became the basis for his outstanding monograph, Gunboats down the Mississippi, which was published in 1965, and in a second edition in 1980, and which acknowledged his debts to the aforementioned scholars Dumond and Fine. Milligan was one of the first to draw attention to the importance of the fresh water navy and the neglected Union naval campaign that penetrated deep into the secessionist South along the Cumberland, Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers in 1862 and 1863.The book continues to be cited by historians, most recently by Earl J. Hess, as a thorough survey of that effective campaign. Public historians have likewise drawn on Professor Milligan’s scholarship citing his work on information panels for the gunboat Cairo exhibit at the Vicksburg National Military Park. A subsequent study, edited by Professor Milligan, From the Fresh-water Navy: 1861-64: The Lett ers of Acting Master's Mate Henry R. Browne and Acting Ensign Symmes E. Browne (1970) was also devoted to the same naval theater.

His scholarship also included articles in the journals Civil War History and History and Theory, the latter of which deconstructed a primary source that contained explosive charges made by a Union naval officer who served on the inland waters. Professor Milligan rightly termed the accusations “sensational” and then proceeded to critically analyze the source in a truly dazzling article tailor-made for an historical methods course.

Professor Milligan’s intellectual specialization was military history, not the new military-and-society type of social and cultural history of warfare, but rather the older strategy-and-tactics type of military history. Several colleagues found Milligan’s engagement with military history difficult to understand. A gentle, soft-spoken man, who abhorred violence, some wondered what about war held an interest for him. The answer lay in his various engagements with the past. He believed in the Union cause as necessary to end slavery, and respected the men who saw it to success on the battlefield. His analytical interests were in questions of the assertion and rewarding of military leadership among individual officers, each in Milligan’s telling with his own singular and significant character, within the complex hierarchy that is a military institution. 

Milligan and his wife Joyce, who died in 2007, were participants, often in leadership roles, in many progressive causes within Buffalo having to do with opposing war, desegregation and racial equality, civil liberties, and social reform, and were active in a number of local and national political campaigns. The Milligans expressed their concern with racial justice in setting up the Joyce J. and John D. Milligan and Family Scholarships for under-represented minority students studying history at UB.

Professor Milligan leaves four daughters and one grandchild as well as former colleagues and students to remember him.

-Thomas M. Grace

A version of this tribute appeared in the history department newsletter of the University at Buffalo.

Posted: October 30, 2018
Tagged: In Memoriam


Selwyn College Cambridge - Keasbey Research Fellowship in American Studies

Applications are invited for a stipendiary research fellowship, the Keasbey Research Fellowship in American Studies (any Arts, Humanities or Social Sciences subject relating to North American studies). Normally tenable for a fixed term of three years from 1 October 2019, the fellowship is open to any candidates, with no age limit, who have recently completed their PhD or be close to completion. We would anticipate that the successful candidate will submit before 1st October 2019. The function of the fellowship is as an initial (normally) post-doctoral position appropriate to the start of an academic career.

The initial pensionable stipend for a research fellow with a PhD (and who does not already have a salaried position) is currently £19,439 rising to £21,134 in year 3. The non-incremental stipend for a research fellow who has not yet been awarded their PhD is currently £17,330. Candidates are responsible for checking their eligibility to take up the post under UK immigration rules.

Further information with the link to the application system is available here>>

Applications must be submitted online by 17.00 on 14 November 2018

Posted: October 30, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Proposed Destruction of Department of Interior Records

In recent days, misinformation has gone viral on the internet that the Department of Interior is proposing to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) the destruction of valuable historical records having to do with the Endangered Species Act, Fish and Wildlife, energy management and other important environmental issues under the department’s jurisdiction. Conversations with senior officials at the National Archives, as well as colleagues working for several major open government groups and other in the archival community has helped the NCH to clarify the situation. NARA has been most cooperative and agreed to extend the comment period on recently proposed decisions on the disposition of records to November 26, 2018, so all parties have adequate opportunity to prepare responses.

Read more >

Read more >

Posted: October 26, 2018
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Profession


The 2019 International Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War: Call for Papers

The George Washington University Cold War Group (GWCW), the LSE IDEAS Cold War Studies Project (CWSP), and the Center for Cold War Studies (CCWS) of the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) are pleased to announce their 2019 International Graduate Conference on the Cold War, to take place at the George Washington University from 2-4 May 2019.

The conference is an excellent opportunity for graduate students to present papers and receive critical feedback from peers and experts in the field. We encourage submissions by graduate students working on any aspect of the Cold War, broadly defined. Of particular interest are papers that employ newly available primary sources or non-traditional methodologies.

To be considered, each prospective participant should submit a two-page proposal and a brief academic CV (in Word or pdf format) to Jinny Ahn at Asia@gwu.edu by 8 January 2019. The subject heading should be clearly marked “Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War.” Notification of acceptance will occur by         15 February.

Successful applicants will be expected to e-mail their papers (no longer than 25 pages) by 29 March.

The author of the strongest paper will be awarded the Saki Ruth Dockrill Memorial Prize of £100 to be spent on books in any form. The winner will also have an opportunity to publish his or her article in the journal Cold War History.

For further information, please contact Gregg Brazinsky at brazinsk@gwu.edu.

The conference sessions will be chaired by prominent faculty members from LSE, GWU, UCSB, and elsewhere. The organizers will cover accommodation costs of admitted student participants for the duration of the conference, but students will need to cover the costs of their travel to Washington.

The website can be found here>>

Posted: October 25, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Microhisories of the Civil War Era

On the one hand, microhistories, with their focus on the small scale, have the potential to shift paradigms by revealing connections and patterns obscured by the birds-eye view. However, examining a narrow subject so deeply may also offer a window into wider society because as historian Jill Lepore puts it, “however singular a person’s life may be, the value of examining it lies not in its uniqueness, but in its exemplariness, in how that individual’s life serves as an allegory for broader issues affecting culture as a whole.” The era of the Civil War is particularly suited for such deep dives, because it so significantly redefined the nation, and because so many individuals recorded their experiences. As we continue to expand our scholarship to include the experiences of those on the margins – people, places, and events often left out of traditional narratives of the period – we must grapple with an important question: to what extent can human s ingularity illuminate universal truths? This conference will address questions both of the value of individual stories and lives for their own sake, and of how seemingly small stories can offer a richer understanding of the broad contours of this period and even shift how we understand the period at all.

We welcome papers covering the Civil War era, broadly defined. This can include the political and cultural causes of the conflict, the ways individuals experienced the war on the battlefields and on the homefront, the shape of Reconstruction, and the legacies of war and emancipation. We are particularly interested in papers that consider subjects, groups, and ideas not traditionally covered in Civil War histories. We also welcome papers considering the methodology of microhistory in the American Civil War context.

Professors Richard Bell (University of Maryland) and Judith Giesberg (Villanova University) will deliver keynote presentations.

Please submit your paper proposals (max. 500 words) as well as any questions to Caitlin Verboon (cverboon@vt.edu) by January 15, 2019. Proposals should be accompanied by a brief CV. All presenters will be asked to submit written papers in advance of the conference, and the papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume or special journal issue. This conference is sponsored by the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies (civilwar.vt.edu). A limited amount of funding to cover lodging is available for scholars without access to departmental funds. Please indicate in your application if you would like to be considered.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 24, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Symposium: "Pre-Columbian & Early Colonial Florida" (Oct 27-28)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The History Council is hosting a symposium in St. Petersburg on October 27-28 that will feature many experts on Florida as it existed before and during the time of the first contact by Europeans with Native Americans.

Topics will include Native Americans of Pre-Columbian Florida; the wildlife, flora, fauna, and coastal geography of the area during the Pre-Columbian and “first contact” periods, and early attempts at settlement and exploration of the Florida west coast.

WHAT: The west coast of Florida, from Charlotte Harbor to Tampa Bay, are the sites of the first exploration and settlement attempts by Europeans in the New World. From Juan Ponce de León’s discovery of the Florida west coast in 1513, to his settlement attempt in 1521, to the Narváez Expedition in 1528, to the Hernando de Soto Expedition of 1540, little is known about where their landings in “La Florida” occurred, and little is known of the Native Americans who were here at the time. The symposium will include presentations and introduce new research, to help us to understand more about the people who came here, the people who lived here at the time, and where the explorer’s excursions took them.

WHEN: Saturday, October 27 and Sunday, October 28

WHERE: St. Petersburg Yacht Club, with visits to: The Anderson/Narváez Site (Jungle Prada Archaeological Site), and The James Museum of Western and Wildlife Art (opened May 2018); St. Petersburg Hilton has discounted rooms for symposium registrants.

WHO: Hosted by The History Council; Open to public (limited tickets available)

Speakers include Sterling Professor Rolena Adorno of Yale University; Professor Emeritus Jerald Milanich of the University of Florida; Chair and Professor J. Michael Francis of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg; Professor Emeritus Barbara Purdy of the University of Florida; Professor Emeritus Martin Favata of the University of Tampa; Professor Ping Wang of the University of South Florida; and Professor Emeritus Al Hine of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

Tickets and further information are available at HistoryCouncil.org.

 

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Posted: October 17, 2018
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Loring Fellowship on the Civil War

The Boston Athenaeum and the Massachusetts Historical Society will offer one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, its Origins, and Consequences for at least four weeks at each institution. This fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000. The Loring application deadline is February 15, 2019.

The recipient will conduct research for at least four weeks at each institution. The Athenaeum’s Civil War collections are anchored by its holdings of Confederate states imprints, the largest in the nation, consisting of books, maps, broadsides, sheet music, government documental publications, and other materials organized according to the Parrish & Willingham bibliography. The Society’s manuscript holdings on the Civil War are particularly strong. They include, for instance, diaries, photographs, correspondence from the battlefield and the home front, papers of political leaders, materials on black regiments raised in Massachusetts, and extensive holdings on the U.S. Sanitary Commission. The Athenaeum and the Society are especially interested in projects for which both repositories’ resources are vital. Each institution will automatically refer unsuccessful proposals to its short-term fellowship competition.

For futher information, click here>> 

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


New England Regional Fellowship Consortium Grants

The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC), a collaboration of twenty-seven major cultural agencies, will offer at least twenty awards in 2019-2020. Each grant will provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research at three or more participating institutions between June 1, 2019, and May 31, 2020.

Two new institutions joined the Consortium this past year: the Chapin Library at Williams College, and the University of Vermont Special Collections! The full list of participating institutions is below.

Participants include: Baker Library, Harvard Business School; Boston Athenæum; Boston Public Library, Norman B. Leventhal Map Center; John J. Burns Library, Boston College; Chapin Library, Williams College; Colonial Society of Massachusetts; Congregational Library and Archives; Connecticut Historical Society; Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine; Mary Baker Eddy Library; Harvard Law School Special Collections; Harvard University Archives; John Hay Library, Brown University; Historic Deerfield; Houghton Library, Harvard University; Maine Historical Society; Massachusetts Historical Society; Mystic Seaport; New England Historic Genealogical Society; New Hampshire Historical Society; Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education, University of Southern Maine; Rauner Special Collections Library, Dartmouth College; Rhode Island Historical Society; Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute; Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College; University of Vermont Special Coll ections; Vermont Historical Society.

Deadline: February 1, 2019. 

For information on the NERFC fellowship competition and to apply online, visit www.nerfc.org. Questions? Email fellowships@masshist.org.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Cornell University College of Human Ecology History of Home Economics Fellowship

The College of Human Ecology at Cornell University is accepting applications for the 2019 Dean's Fellowship in the History of Home Economics. 

We invite faculty members, research scholars, and advanced graduate students (must be eligible to work in the United States) with demonstrated background and experience in historical studies to apply for this post-graduate opportunity. The fellowship recipient will receive an award of $6,500 for a summer or sabbatical residency of approximately six weeks to use the unique resources available from the College and the Cornell University Library system in pursuit of scholarly research in the history of Home Economics and its impact on American society. 

At the conclusion of the residency the fellowship recipient will provide a final report to the dean, including a bibliography of research pursued, and preservation recommendations for pertinent library and archival holdings. In addition, the recipient will be invited to give a public presentation on their research at a later date. Research projects should be intended for publication.

Relevant historical subject areas may include, but are not limited to: the role of women in the family and society, the history of women in higher education, the history of food, nutrition, housing, consumer economics, the family, child development, design, clothing and textiles among other key topics in American social history. We welcome applications in which the historical subject area may inform the investigation of contemporary societal issues.

The deadline for receipt of all application materials is Friday, March 1, 2019.

For futher information, click here>> 


Please circulate this announcement to your professional networks.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships