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Nancy Weiss Malkiel Scholars Award

The Nancy Weiss Malkiel Scholars Award Program is now accepting applications through December 15, 2016. This opportunity is for tenure-track faculty who are committed not only to research and teaching but also to building a more inclusive scholarly community. Applicants may not be going up for tenure during the award year (2017–18).

Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Malkiel Scholars Award offers a $17,500 stipend—$10,000 to be used for summer research support and $7,500 for research assistance during the academic year. While Malkiel Scholars may be working in any field of the humanities or social sciences, preference will be given to those whose work relates to 20th- and 21st-century American history, politics, culture, and society, with emphases including but not limited to African American issues, women's issues, and/or higher education.

Additional information is available at www.woodrow.org/nwm.

To download a one page brochure click here.

Posted: October 25, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes

Massachusetts Historical Society Fellowships

The first of our deadlines, for MHS-NEH support, is January 15, 2017!

The Massachusetts Historical Society will offer more than three dozen research fellowships for the academic year 2017-2018, including two MHS-NEH Long-term Fellowships made possible by an award from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The stipend, governed by an NEH formula, is $4,200 per month for a minimum of four months and a maximum of twelve months. The Society adds a monthly supplement, payable directly to the MHS-NEH Fellow, of $562.50.

MHS Short-term Fellowships carry a stipend of $2,000 to support four or more weeks of research in the Society's collections. The Boston Athenaeum and the MHS will offer one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, its Origins, and Consequences for at least four weeks at each institution. This fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000. The Society also participates in the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium of twenty-two organizations. These grants provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research conducted at three or more participating institutions.

For more information, please visit www.masshist.org/research/fellowships, email fellowships@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568. MHS-NEH application deadline: January 15, 2017. New England Regional Fellowship Consortium deadline: February 1, 2017. Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship deadline: February 15, 2017. MHS Short-term Fellowship deadline: March 1, 2017.

Posted: October 19, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships

Legacies of the Manhattan Project at 75 Years

The Manhattan Project was, arguably, the defining event of the twentieth century. More even than the Second World War itself, the Manhattan Project and its Cold War legacy altered the course of world history. For decades shrouded in secrecy and nourished by fear, we are only now—some seventy-five years on—beginning to understand the full effects of that event and its complex aftermath.

Predictably, then, the various legacies of the Manhattan Project have been central to a remarkably diverse and cross-disciplinary body of scholarship. Moreover, ongoing declassification of Manhattan Project-era materials and opening of archives has allowed access to new sources that have forced reevaluations of key decisions and outcomes in virtually every field of research touching on the atomic and nuclear age.

"Legacies of the Manhattan Project" will bring these disparate academic conversations together at a key moment for understanding the origins and consequences of our nuclear past, present, and future.

We invite papers that deal with any aspect of this topic, regardless of disciplinary perspective. Possible themes include (but are not limited to) reconsiderations of

· the rise of the military-industrial complex
· the history of science and technology
· the sociology and politics of the Cold War
· environmental impacts and waste remediation
· literatures of the environment
· the impact of technology on the American West and its
indigenous and settler cultures.

We welcome submissions from both established and emerging scholars for 20 minute panel papers, panel proposals of 3-4 panelists, and plenary sessions of no more than 60 minutes.

Please direct abstracts (not to exceed 250 words) and inquiries to ourhanfordhistory@tricity.wsu.edu no later than January 6, 2017.

For More Information: http://www.tricities.wsu.edu/hanfordhistory

Posted: October 19, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers

AEF's 2017 Visiting Professor Program (VPP)

The VPP is a seven-day fellowship for professors of advertising, marketing, communications and the liberal arts. It allows professors and industry to develop a mutually beneficial relationship and to share research. The VPP gives professors a greater understanding of the industry while host companies have an opportunity to develop closer ties to academia. Professors witness first-hand the day-to-day operations of a company, while bringing academic expertise to that company. In addition, host companies tap into research and expertise from an academic POV as well as establishing a pipeline to students for internships and jobs.

Application deadlines for the 2017 VPP is 1/31/17.

Visit www.aef.com for further information.

Posted: October 14, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships

Journal of American History Executive Editor Named

The OAH is pleased to announce that Benjamin H. Irvin, associate professor at the University of Arizona, has been named the new Executive Editor of the Journal of American History and associate professor in the department of history at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the author of Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors (2011). Irvin has worked on the editorial boards or staffs of Common-Place: The Journal of Early American Life, History Compass, and the Journal of American History. He is also a Distinguished Lecturer with the Organization of American Historians.

Irvin will begin his term as Executive Editor of the Journal of American History in August 2017.

Posted: October 14, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession

Reminder - 2017 OAH Election Information

2017 Slate of Candidates

OAH President: Edward L. Ayers, University of Richmond
OAH President-Elect: Earl Lewis, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
OAH Vice President: Joanne Meyerowitz, Yale University

Executive Board Pair 1:
Lu Ann Jones, National Park Service
Jamil S. Zainaldin, Georgia Humanities

Executive Board Pair 2:
Daniel Okrent, Independent Scholar
T. J. Stiles, Independent Scholar

Executive Board Pair 3:
Adrienne D. Davis, Washington University in St. Louis
Martha S. Jones, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Nominating Board Pair 1: Jennifer M. Spear, Simon Fraser University
Serena R. Zabin, Carleton College

Nominating Board Pair 2:
Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas at Austin

Nominating Board Pair 3:
Kariann Akemi Yokota, University of Colorado Denver
David Sehat, Georgia State University

Notes about the Election

One hundred voting members of the Organization may present a petition for an additional candidate for any office open for election, such petition to be presented to the Executive Director by October 15. The names of persons so nominated shall be placed on the official ballot, being identified as "candidate by petition." The ballot shall also contain a space where members may suggest candidates for the following year.

Voting for the 2017 OAH Election will open December 1, 2016, and will be entirely online.

Please contact us at oah@oah.org with any questions.

Posted: October 14, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization

OAH Member Rebecca Jo Plant Named Recipient of the 2016 Letitia Woods Brown Article Prize

OAH member Rebecca Jo Plant and her co-author, Frances Clarke, have received the 2016 Letitia Woods Brown Article Prize, given annually by the Association of Black Women Historians. Their article, "'The Crowning Insult': Federal Segregation and the Gold Star Mother and Widow Pilgrimages of the Early 1930s," appeared in the September 2015 issue of the Journal of American History. The OAH congratulates Professors Plant and Clarke on their accomplishment.

Posted: October 14, 2016
Tagged: Clio's Kudos

Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

The Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture offers a variety of long-term, short-term, and travel fellowships to scholars at the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels.

Application deadlines vary. Application guidelines and program details can be found here under "Fellowships."

Posted: October 14, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships

Fellowships in the History of Knowledge, Race & Ethnicity, Religion, Kinship, Migration

The German Historical Institute, Washington, DC, is now accepting applications for a 6 to 12-month fellowships in:

1) The History of Knowledge
2) The History of Race and Ethnicity
3) The History of Religion and Religiosity
4) The History of Family and Kinship
5) The History of Migration

The fellowship term begins September 1, 2017.

The Fellow is expected to be in residence in Washington, DC, and participate in GHI activities and events. The Fellow will have the opportunity to make use of the resources in the Washington metropolitan area, including the Library of Congress and the National Archives, while pursuing his or her own research. Travel within the US to work in archives and libraries will also be possible. Candidates doing original research for a dissertation or a second book project will be given preference.

The fellowship is open to both doctoral and postdoctoral scholars. The monthly stipend is € 1,700 for doctoral students and € 3,000 for postdoctoral scholars from European institutions; students and scholars based at North American institutions will receive a stipend of $1,900 or $3,200 respectively. In addition, fellowship recipients based in Europe will receive reimbursement for their round-trip airfare to the U.S.

To apply please send a cover letter, a CV, a copy of your most recent diploma or transcripts, at least one letter of reference (sent separately), a research project proposal (5-pages or 2,000 words max), and a research schedule for the fellowship period, no later than December 1, 2016. Applicants may write in either English or German; we recommend that they use the language in which they are most proficient. Please also clearly state in the application why your project is a good fit for this specific fellowship. Applications should be sent electronically as single PDF via e-mail to Bryan Hart at fellowships@ghi-dc.org.

For More Information: http://www.ghi-dc.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=287&Itemid=62

Posted: October 11, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships

Cummings book prize, Vernacular Architecture Forum

Call for Nominations: 2017 Abbott Lowell Cummings Book Prize
Due December 15, 2016

The Abbott Lowell Cummings Prize, named after the founding president of the Vernacular Architecture Forum, is awarded annually to the publication that has made the most significant contribution to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes. In judging the nominated books, the jurors look for a publication that is:
- based on primary research,
- emphasizes fieldwork that takes seriously the materiality of architecture and landscapes, and draws on particular elements of environments as evidence.
- breaks new ground in interpretation or methodology, and
- contributes generally to the intellectual vitality of vernacular studies in North America

Entries may come from any discipline concerned with vernacular architecture studies. Books published from January 2015 through December 2016 are eligible for consideration. Edited collections of previously published materials are not eligible.

The deadline for the 2017 Cummings Prize is December 15, 2016.

There is no application form, but a cover letter should include a complete mailing address, phone number and email address in order to notify the candidate should the nominated work receive the award.

Books should be sent directly to each of the three committee members for the Cummings Prize. Please contact the committee chair with any questions at cummingsprize (at) vafweb.org.

2017 Cummings Prize committee:

Ryan Smith, chair
Department of History
Virginia Commonwealth University
811 S. Cathedral Place
Richmond, VA 23284-9105

Annmarie Adams
School of Architecture
McGill University
815 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0C2
*To avoid customs charges for the book recipients, please ensure the shippers pay all duties and taxes. The parcels must arrive Delivered Duty Paid (DDP).

Robert Saint-George
Department of History
University of Pennsylvania
1 College Hall, Room 208
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6379

More information is available at: http://www.vafweb.org/Cummings-Prize

Posted: October 11, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes

2017 Research Fellowships at the Virginia Historical Society

To promote the interpretation of Virginia history and access to its collections, the Virginia Historical Society, funded by a matching grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and gifts from individuals, offers research fellowships of up to three weeks a year. For the purpose of this program, a week is defined as five days in the VHS library, which is open 10–5, Monday through Saturday.

The deadline for applications is Friday, January 27, 2017.

Contact Info:
John M. McClure, Chair, Research Fellowships and Awards Committee
Virginia Historical Society
P.O. Box 7311
Richmond, VA 23221-0311
Telephone: 804.342.9686
Fax: 804.355.2399

For More Information: http://www.vahistorical.org/collections-and-resources/how-we-can-help-your-research/researcher-resources/research-fellowship-and

Posted: October 11, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships

OAH President Nancy Cott on Texas Textbook Controversy

OAH President Nancy Cott, on behalf of the OAH Executive Committee, has joined with other scholars, concerned citizens, and the American Historical Association to raise objections to the proposed Mexican American Studies textbook under consideration by the Texas State Board of Education. Her letter can be read here.

The textbook, proposed in response to activist efforts to include Mexican American studies as part of the Texas history curriculum, has come under fire from teachers, activists, law makers, and scholars. An Ad Hoc Committee convened by the Texas Board of Education as part of a customary review process submitted its 54-page "Report on a Proposed Social Studies Special Topic Textbook, Mexican American Heritage," on September 6, which details the numerous factual inaccuracies and offensive stereotypes found in the text.

If the Texas State Board of Education agrees that there are errors, the publisher, Momentum Instruction, will be given an opportunity to address them prior to the board vote. The Texas State Board of Education will decide after the election in November whether the textbook will be adopted for the 2017-2018 school year.

Posted: September 30, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession

OAH President Nancy Cott's Letter to Lincoln University

Several months ago, the OAH learned that the Board of Curators at Lincoln University decided to deactivate its history degree programs, thereby preventing students from enrolling in these programs. In response to this news, OAH President Nancy Cott sent a letter to Lincoln University President Dr. Kevin D. Rome Sr. urging the Board of Curators to reconsider their decision.

On Thursday, September 29, the OAH heard that LU Faculty Senate members have supported a "no confidence vote" on the work of Said Sewell, the university's provost and vice president for academic affairs. The Jefferson, Missouri, News Tribune noted that OAH had urged the university to reverse its decision and reactivate its program quickly. President Cott's letter was heavily cited in the newspaper article, which you can read here (http://www.newstribune.com/news/story/story/2016/Sep/29/curators-history-degree-decision-questioned/642415/)

Posted: September 29, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession

Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence

Please see the attached call for papers regarding a conference titled "Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence" at Yale University on February 24-25, 2017. This conference will focus on issues of science and racial violence as objects of historical study, as well as consider lingering inequalities and injustices within history as a discipline. We further hope to share strategies for deploying academic scholarship as activism and explore tactics for building alliances with communities of activists outside the academy.

In conjunction with the conference, we are co-sponsoring a panel with the Program for the Humanities in Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. The panel will feature Craig Wilder, the Barton L. Weller Professor of History at MIT, and a number of Yale faculty and community members. The panel will address Yale's historical links to slavery, the significance of naming the college "Calhoun" in the 1930s, the impact of racialized trauma on mental health, and the longer history of protest against names associated with slavery, such as "Calhoun," at American universities.

Please circulate this call for papers widely to any who might be interested.


Posted: September 22, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers

U.S. Catholic Historian: Sacraments and Sacramentals

For more than thirty years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism. An upcoming issue will address the theme of sacraments and sacramentals. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, studies of the following:

Scholars considering a submission are asked to contact the editor, Fr. David Endres at DEndres@Athenaeum.edu before preparing a contribution. Approximate length is 7,000-10,000 words. We ask for submissions by September 1, 2017 and look forward to hearing from potential contributors.

Fr. David Endres
Editor, U.S. Catholic Historian

Posted: September 22, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers

Vernacular Architecture Forum 2017 Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah

The Vernacular Architecture Forum (www.vafweb.org) invites paper proposals for its 36th Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31-June 3, 2017. Papers may address vernacular and everyday buildings, sites, or cultural landscapes worldwide. Submissions on all relevant topics are welcome but we encourage papers exploring western American themes, including ethnic settlement, landscapes of ranching, mining, and agriculture, urbanization, religious expression, Native American identity, and the creation of vacation and recreation landscapes. Additionally, the VAF is launching a multi-year program of inquiry into the distinctiveness of the VAF and the vernacular architecture movement. To this end, we encourage papers that consider this field over time. How does the wide range of VAF projects (tours, guidebooks, book and article awards, field schools, annual conference papers, publications, etc.) demonstrate how our questions, concerns, and methods have changed and evolved? Whe re do we see evidence of that history in our current work, and what might our future look like? Proposals might focus on a particular building type (i.e. houses, barns), a research strategy (fieldwork), political or theoretical convictions (Gender, Marxism, the Everyday, etc), or particular approaches to presenting our work and engaging colleagues and the public.

Students and young professionals may also apply for the Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships offering support of up to $500 to presenting papers at VAF's annual conference.

Papers should be analytical rather than descriptive, and no more than twenty minutes in length. Proposals for complete sessions, roundtable discussions or other innovative means that facilitate scholarly discourse are especially encouraged. At least one session will be devoted to Field Notes – shorter papers (five to eight minutes in length) that introduce new techniques, innovations, and discoveries in documenting vernacular buildings and landscapes. Proposals should clearly state the argument of the paper and explain the methodology and content in fewer than 400 words. Make sure to indicate if it is a regular paper proposal or a shorter fieldwork proposal. Please include the paper title, author's name, email address, a one-page c.v. You may include up to two images with your submission. Note that presenters must deliver their papers in person and be VAF members at the time of the conference. Speakers who do not register for the conference by March 1, 2017, will be withdrawn. Please do not submit an abstract if you are not committed to attending the papers session on Saturday, June 3rd.

THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS OCTOBER 30, 2016. The abstracts and c.v. should be emailed as a PDF attachment to the VAF Papers Committee Chair, Daves Rossell, at papers@vafweb.org. For general information about the Salt Lake City conference, please visit the conference website at the www.vafweb.org/saltlakecity-2017 or contact Alison Flanders at saltlakecity@vafweb.org.

Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships:
VAF's Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships offer a limited amount of financial assistance to students and young professionals presenting papers at VAF's annual conference. Awards are intended to offset travel and registration costs for students, and to attract developing scholars to the organization. Any person presenting a paper who is currently enrolled in a degree-granting program, or who has received a degree within one year of the annual conference is eligible to apply. Awards cannot exceed $500. Previous awardees are ineligible, even if their status has changed. Recipients are expected to participate fully in the conference, including tours and workshops.

To apply, submit with your abstract a one-page attachment with "Simpson Presenter's Fellowship" at the top and the following information: 1) name, 2) institution or former institution, 3) degree program, 4) date of degree (received or anticipated), 5) mailing address, 6) permanent email address, 7) telephone number, and 8) paper title.

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers

Bishir Prize, Vernacular Architecture Forum

Does your work contribute to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes? Have you published a scholarly article on the subject in the last two years? You may be eligible for the Bishir Prize.

The Bishir Prize, named for longtime member and influential scholar Catherine W. Bishir, is awarded annually to the scholarly article from a juried North American publication that has made the most significant contribution to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes. They should be based on primary research, break new ground in interpretation or methodology, and contribute to the intellectual vitality of these fields. Entries may come from any discipline concerned with vernacular architecture studies.
Please note that essays published as chapters in a book are also eligible if the volume is peer-reviewed, published within the time parameters specified, and the research presented in the essay is new. Anthologized collections are not eligible.

The deadline for nominations for the 2017 Bishir Prize is December 20, 2016.

To nominate an article please submit the following:

Nomination materials should be submitted to Arijit Sen at bishirprize@vafweb.org

For more information: http://www.vernaculararchitectureforum.org/Bishir-prize

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes

2017 Cryptologic History Symposium

The Center for Cryptologic History invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the biennial Symposium on Cryptologic History which will take place October 19 - 20, 2017. The Symposium will be held at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Center in Laurel, Maryland. Following the Symposium, on Saturday, October 21, participants will be given an opportunity to tour the National Cryptologic Museum and participate in a workshop on sources for research in cryptologic history.

The theme for the 2017 Symposium will be "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum." There are many milestones to mark in 2017: the 160th anniversary of the first attempt to span the Atlantic with a telegraph cable, 100 years since both the entry of the United States into World War I and the Russian October Revolution, and 75 years after the World War II battles of Coral Sea and Midway. Our Symposium will take place just a few months before the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, and during the 25th year after the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Papers looking at these milestone events in cryptology and considering how we remember their significance are particularly encouraged, as are those examining how cryptologic advances from these times provided momentum to create the systems of today and the future.

We are also eager to have proposals on cryptologic topics that diverge from the theme. Submissions from those who are new to the field, particularly graduate students, are very welcome. This will ensure the variety and diversity of exchange that has been the hallmark of this event.

There will be a World War I-specific track to mark the centennial of American participation in that war and the birth of modern signals intelligence.

The proposals and papers must be unclassified. We encourage proposals for single presentations and full panels; the program committee may form panels from single presentations with like topics. Presenters should be prepared to speak for 15-20 minutes; proposals for a longer time slot should include a strong justification.

Your proposal package should include an abstract of no more than ONE page, a complete CV, a short biographical sketch (not to exceed 150 words) to be used in the program, the amount of time you require for your paper, and full contact details. Panel proposals should include the above for each presenter and a short explanation of the panel's theme.

Please submit your proposal by noon on Monday, February 6, 2017, to Program Chair Betsy Rohaly Smoot at history@nsa.gov or to her care at The Center for Cryptologic History, Suite 6886, 9800 Savage Road, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755. Please note that correspondence that does not include the suite number may not be delivered in a timely manner. Proposals received after noon on February 6 will be considered on a space-available basis. The program committee will notify you about the final status of your proposal by June 9, 2017, but may engage you in discussions before that date.

For More Information: https://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic-heritage/center-cryptologic-history/

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers

Historical Sociolinguistics Network 2017 Meeting

Historical Sociolinguistics Network 2017
CUNY Graduate Center/New York University
New York City, April 6–7, 2017
Examining the Social in Historical Sociolinguistics: Methods and Theory

The 2017 international meeting of the Historical Sociolinguistics Network (HiSoN) will be held April 6–7, 2017, to be co-hosted by the City University of New York's Graduate Center and New York University. This year's conference will feature plenaries by three noted scholars in the field: Anita Auer, Professor of English Linguistics at the Université de Lausanne; Nils Langer, Professor of North Frisian and Minority Issues at the University of Flensburg; and Donald Tuten, Associate Professor of Spanish and Linguistics at Emory University. For more information about the Historical Sociolinguistics Network, visit http://hison.sbg.ac.at/.

The conference welcomes submissions for roundtables, panels, individual presentations, and workshops on themes addressed by researchers working in historical sociolinguistics. We take a broad view of the field that includes the reconstruction of linguistic variation and change; the ideological analysis of linguistic history; the cultural and social history of languages; the relation between language and literary history; and the analysis or collation of linguistic corpora of various languages and historical periods. Scholars working with or on language within disciplines and theoretical frameworks other than those typically associated with sociolinguistics—such as linguistic anthropology, literary analysis, cultural studies or history—are encouraged to submit proposals.

The conference co-hosts particularly invite submissions focusing on the theme of "Examining the Social in Historical Sociolinguistics: Methods and Theory." One of the central intersections between the multiple disciplines represented by those working on the history of languages remains the social, a term with a complicated theoretical pedigree that has changed in its use and meaning significantly from decade to decade. This volatility in meaning and utility from a methodological standpoint stands in contrast to its importance to the field of historical sociolinguistics. The "social" is a term that offers both the opportunity for interdisciplinary and collaborative understanding of the relationship between communities and changes in the language they speak, as well as the risk of uncertainty and even obsolescence as a means of describing the bonds and functions of speech communities.

Given the unique position of scholars of the history of language to collaboratively define the social from both a linguistic and a historical standpoint, how might this concept be theorized going forward? How has our understanding of the social changed in the context of new findings brought by expanded access to historical corpora in digital form, the increasingly sophisticated focus by historians and literary scholars on the working of power in society, and more clearly defined methods of exploring internal and external linguistic change than ever before? We invite contributors seeking to understand this and other current research questions related to the history of language, broadly defined.

Panel and roundtable submissions should include 3 to 4 participants. Individual paper proposals should be 250 words in length, and should include a brief (50-word) bio of the submitter. Panel and roundtable proposals should be 500 words total in length and include a description of the session as well as brief descriptions of each paper and short bios (an additional 50 words) for each participant. The deadline for abstracts is 1 November 2016. Please upload proposals at http://hison2017.info/submissions.html. For questions, please contact the conference organizers at hison2017@gmail.com.

For More Information: http://hison.info

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers

Conference on Migrations and Borders, Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

"Migrations and borders in the United States: discourses, representations, imaginary contexts." Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

CFP: "Migrations and borders in the United States: discourses, representations, imaginary contexts." Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

Migration studies are at the core of American history. Whether voluntary or involuntary, migrations peopled the continent. Waves of immigration have created an American identity which is continuously modified by new arrivals and changing patterns of cultural transmission and dominance. While cultural mobility seems to be an unstoppable global phenomenon, local resistance, mainly among minorities, is observed. Cultures—or cultural traits—also migrate on their own, disregarding borders.

The international borders of the United States have evolved from a moving 'frontier' line and have reached their present state in the 19th century. International borders have evolved from porous to tight, first on the Mexican border, and after 9/11, also on the Canadian border. 'Borderland' studies (Herbert Bolton) date back to the early decades of the 20th Century but experience a renewal. Other internal 'borders' are continuously shifting: borders between different land-use areas—protected vs unprotected, land lost or gained by Native American Nations, land claimed as Hispanic 'land grants', gentrified neighborhoods, urban sprawl and imploding cities.

The present conference aims to analyze the discourse, the representation and the imaginary contexts linked to migrations and borders in the United States. We welcome interdisciplinary proposals for papers in English and French from the fields of history, cultural, political and discourse studies, sociology, geography, and anthropology. The following themes may be discussed from an historic perspective or from a contemporary viewpoint:

- Migrations, temporary or permanent, economic as well as touristic and educational; the impact of migrants on American society and identity,
- New visions of border security; the cost of maintaining international borders,
- Shifting identities in America, from the colonial period to the 21st century; constructed and re-constructed identities, diasporas,
- Contact cultures, borderless cultures and local cultures; cultural mobility in the United States; the concept of cultural appropriation.

Deadline for proposals: December 15th, 2016; you will receive an answer on January 15.

Proposals are accepted in English or French (250 words maximum plus short bio 80 words maximum) are to be sent on one page with postal and email address to:

Susanne Berthier-Foglar (Université Grenoble Alpes, France)
Paul Otto (George Fox University, OR, United States)

For More Information: http://ilcea4.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/fr/agenda/colloques/migrations-et-frontieres-aux-etats-unis-discours-representations-imaginaires-migrations-and-borders-in-the-united-states-discourses-representations-imaginary-contexts--86027.kjsp

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers