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News in American History

Alfred D. Chandler Jr. Travel Fellowships

The purpose of this fellowship is to facilitate library and archival research in business or economic history. Individual grants range from $1,000 to $3,000. Three categories of applicants will be eligible for grants: 1) Harvard University graduate students in history, economics, or business administration, whose research requires travel to distant archives or repositories; 2) graduate students or nontenured faculty in those fields from other universities, in the U.S. and abroad, whose research requires travel to Baker Library and other local archives; and 3) Harvard College undergraduates writing senior theses in these fields whose research requires travel away from Cambridge.

Read more about this fellowship here.

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Posted: May 31, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Call for Proposals: U.S. Catholic Historian--Immigration after 1880

U.S. Catholic Historian seeks submissions for a future issue on the topic of the New Immigrants: Catholic Arrivals after 1880.

Read here for more information about this call for submissions.

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Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project

The James K. Polk Project and the Department of History at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, invite paper proposals for "James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project," to be held at the East Tennessee Historical Society, in Knoxville, on April 12–13, 2019.

Read here for more information about this event.

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Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Australian and New Zealand American Studies Association Conference

The 2019 ANZASA Conference, "Community, Conflict, and 'the Meaning of America'" will be held at the University of Auckland on July 14-16, 2019.

In 1939, Perry Miller published the first volume of The New England Mind, a foundational text in American Studies. Looking back, he regarded this book as part of his life’s study of “the meaning of America.” Eighty years later, the 2019 Australian and New Zealand American Association (ANZASA) Conference will engage with Miller’s intellectual endeavor.

Read more about the conference here.

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Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Martha Hodes Awarded Guggenheim and Cullman Center Fellowships

Martha Hodes, Professor of History at New York University, has been awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and a fellowship at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. She will be writing a book, under contract with HarperCollins, exploring history and memory through a 1970 airplane hijacking, in which she was a twelve-year-old passenger held hostage in the Jordan desert for a week.

Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Clio's Kudos


John F. Kennedy Presidential Library Research Fellowships

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston, Massachusetts invites applications for a number of research fellowships funded through the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. Application deadline is August 15, 2018.

Read here for more information.

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Posted: May 25, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Debut of New Series - We are #OAHistorians

Interested in learning more about your fellow OAH members? Today marks the debut of our new series "We are #OAHistorians." Our first interviewee is Deb Hunter, who writes under the pen name of Hunter S. Jones. She joined the OAH in 2016 and attended her first OAH Annual Meeting in New Orleans.

Interviews are posted on Insights. Read Deb's interview here.

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Posted: May 17, 2018
Tagged: News of the Organization


Watch the 2018 OAH Presidential Address | "Everyone Their Own Historian"

Edward Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft Prize and Beveridge Prize in American history, and was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He has collaborated on major digital history projects, including the Valley of the Shadow, American Panorama, and Bunk, and is one of the cohosts for BackStory, a popular podcast about American history. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond as well as former Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is The Thin Light of Freedom, winner of the 2018 Lincoln Prize from the Gilder Lehrman Institute and the Avery Craven Prize from the OAH.

 

Posted: May 2, 2018
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


In Memoriam - Aidan J. Smith

Aidan J. Smith

On Monday, April 23, the history community lost a friend and colleague when Aidan J. Smith, OAH Public History Manager, unexpectedly passed away. Aidan was a dedicated historian who worked tirelessly overseeing the OAH-NPS collaboration. His loss is being felt across the country and throughout our community. Arrangements are still being finalized, but those who wish to do so can make donations to the Southern Poverty Law Center or the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation in his honor. Notes of condolence for his partner and family can be sent in care of the OAH national office.

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Posted: April 27, 2018
Tagged: In Memoriam


OAH Statement on the Sacramento Shooting of Stephon Clark

As the OAH prepares to gather in Sacramento, California, for our Annual Meeting, we want to use our presence in a constructive way in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of an unarmed man, Stephon Clark, by local police officers. We are working on several initiatives:

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Posted: April 3, 2018
Tagged: News of the Organization


OAH Responds to UW-Stevens Point Eliminating Humanities Majors

Recently University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point (UW-SP) announced the elimination of thirteen humanities and social science majors (including history). OAH President Ed Ayers, on behalf of the OAH Executive Committee, sent a letter expressing concern over the elimination of these programs. As noted in the letter, "eliminating the history major along with a full slate of humanities and social science majors fundamentally distorts the mission of higher education and denies students the right to understand and participate fully in their society." The letter was sent to the UW-SP Chancellor, the UW-SP Provost, and the University of Wisconsin (UW) President, as well as being copied to all members of the UW, four-year campuses and the UW Board of Regents.

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Posted: March 16, 2018
Tagged: News of the Profession, News of the Organization


Call for Proposals - Midwestern History Association

Call for Proposals: Fourth Annual Midwestern History Conference
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Proposal Submission Deadline: Friday, January 12, 2018 (non-negotiable)

The Midwestern History Association and the Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University invite proposals for papers to be delivered at the Fourth Annual Midwestern History Conference, to be held on June 6, 2018 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Proposals should be sent to Scott St. Louis of Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center at stlouis1@gvsu.edu.

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Posted: December 22, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals - ECCSSA East Coast Colleges Social Sciences Association 2018 44th Annual Conference Roundtable

ECCSSA East Coast Colleges Social Sciences Association 2018 44th Annual Conference Roundtable
Call for Papers, Research and Proposals
Open to all disciplines and regions
Rethinking Leadership in Higher Education: Cultivating the Leadership of Learning

April 6-7, 2018
Center for Innovative Technology (Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area)
2214 Rock Hill Road, Herndon, VA 20170

2018_44th_Annual_Conference_Roundtable-Conference_Overview_and_Call.pdf
ECCSSA_Proposal_Form_2018.doc
ECCSSA_2018_Conference_Round_Table_Registration_Form.pdf

 For information contact: roking@nvcc.edu

A Note on the Roundtable Format:
A select group of presenters and participants will gather for two days to present their research and to discuss the work of other presenters. All participants will gather in the same room to hear and discuss each presentation. It is imperative that all presenters and participants be in attendance and fully participate for both days of the roundtable.

 

Posted: December 22, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents, 17 – 21 June 2018, Olympia, Washington

Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents, 17 – 21 June 2018, Olympia, Washington

The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE) welcomes applications for the 47th Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents, to be held 17 – 21 June 2018 at the Red Lion Inn in Olympia, Washington.

The Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents, known informally as "Camp Edit," is an annual five-day workshop for individuals new to the field of historical documentary editing. With the needs of the participants as a guide, experienced documentary editors provide instruction in the principles and practices of documentary editing and insight into the realities of work on a documentary edition.

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Posted: December 22, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Call For Proposals - 2019 OAH Annual Meeting

2019 OAH Annual Meeting | Philadelphia

CALL FOR PROPOSALS ARE NOW OPEN--CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT
Submissions will be accepted between November 27, 2017 and January 12, 2018

Call for Proposals

"The Work of Freedom"

NEW: Use the OAH Annual Meeting Crossroads  to find collaborators or contribute to a proposal for the 2019 OAH Annual Meeting!

From the historical profession's beginnings in the late 19th and early 20th century, freedom has been a dominant theme in research, writing, and public debates on the shape, content, and character of the American experience. Over a century of scholarship and popular discussions have illuminated topics such as the diverse struggles for freedom, the denial of freedom, the limits of freedom, the prospects of freedom, the sources of freedom, the obligations of freedom, the value of freedom, the geographies of freedom, and the meaning of freedom, to name several. Marking the 400th Anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in British North America, the theme of this program shifts the lens to the "Work of Freedom." It aims to capture the labor(s) involved in identifying and securing freedom, from the colonial era and founding of the Republic through the recent election of Donald J. Trump President of the United States.

The program committee encourages proposals focusing on research, teaching, and public education that address our theme as creatively and as broadly as possible. Our theme opens up opportunities for scholars working across a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in colonial North American and U.S. history. We are interested in proposals that probe the theme within the traditional fields of economic, political, diplomatic, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women's/gender history as well as southern, Appalachian, and western history; and the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LBGT, and queer history; environmental and public history; carceral state studies; and transnational and global studies across all fields, topics, and thematic emphases.

Moreover, we hope to take advantage of our meeting in Philadelphia, an iconic setting for struggles and debates over the question of freedom, to encourage proposals that explore the interplay of freedom's work on behalf of African Americans, the poor, workers, and other disfranchised and structurally marginalized groups since people from Africa embarked upon their journey in Jamestown four centuries ago. The committee also welcomes panels, workshops, and roundtables that employ new methodologies, particularly digital humanities technology, that transcend traditional disciplinary and geographic boundaries. Finally, the 2019 Program Committee will reinforce the OAH's ongoing commitment to diversity and inclusion along myriad lines of difference and historic inequality, including ethnic/racial, gender/sexuality, and institutional affiliation, research/teaching, among others.

 


PROPOSAL SUBMITTER RESPONSIBILITIES: Upon review of the submissions, the 2019 Program Committee will only announce a "pending acceptance" or a "rejection." If you receive a pending acceptance it is the proposal submitter's responsibility to ensure that each session participant, regardless of role, completes their speaker agreement within the requested deadline (typically July 1). Once all agreements have been completed, only then will the session be officially accepted. If the agreements are not received by the deadline, the pending acceptance is void.

The proposal submitter is also asked to inform the OAH at the close of the Annual Meeting if any session participants failed to appear without prior notification.

Please ensure each participant reads important notes prior to submission.

 


2019 OAH Annual Meeting Program Committee


Like Program Committees past, we encourage sessions in a variety of formats—traditional panels composed of three papers and a comment, but also sessions of a single paper of unusual significance with several commentators, round tables of several brief papers that explore a significant issue or assess the state of a field, workshops, and sessions devoted to teaching. A descriptive list of session formats is found below.

All sessions will be 90 minutes in length, with the exception of workshops, which may run longer.

Twenty-five minutes should be reserved for discussion.

If the proposed session takes the traditional form of a series of papers with a comment, proposers should take into account the 90-minute slot, with 25 minutes reserved for discussion, when developing the proposal.

Session Types

Please remember that all sessions except workshops are 90 minutes in length and that 25 minutes should be reserved for discussion.

Paper Session: The traditional session format, paper sessions feature a chair, three or four papers, and one or two commentators. A single paper can have one or more presenters.

Panel Discussion: Panel discussions include a group of people discussing one topic, such as a film, a new text, or a tribute to a well-known scholar. Each panelist speaks on a distinct topic relating to the session theme. These sessions include a chair, three to five panelists, and no commentator.

Roundtable Discussion: Roundtable discussions include a group of experts discussing a topic. A moderator leads the discussion, but all participants speak equally about the topic, with no distinct topic assigned to each participant. These sessions include a chair, three to five participants, and no commentator.

State of the Field: In these panels senior historians and new professionals discuss a subfield of American history in depth. These panels have one chair, two or three panelists, and no commentator. These sessions will be recorded.
 

Workshop: A workshop is a training session where the presenters work directly with participants to teach them a new skill or concept. Workshops are usually small, so the group can participate in the learning and interact with the presenters.Please indicate the length needed for the workshop. These sessions often have one or two presenters.

Debate: A debate is a regulated discussion of an issue with two matched sides. Debates have one moderator, two or more panelists, and no commentators.

Single Paper: Single paper proposals include a paper that the presenter would like the program committee to join with other single paper proposals or small sessions. The committee can only place single papers if other papers pair well to create a complete session. We encourage you to utilize the OAH Online Member Directory  or use the NEW: OAH Crossroads to connect with other historians in your field to construct a full proposal for consideration. 

Chat Seminar: 45-minute seminars that encourage discussion, debate, and conversation about topics trending in the field of American history. Each chat is led by 1-2 moderators who are not content providers, but instead direct and guide the conversation. Chats take place over the lunch period on the Saturday of the conference only. Chats include one or two moderators, and no commentators, panelists, or presenters.

Film Screening: Film screenings usually show all or a portion of a film and include a question-and-answer segment with the filmmaker and producers. Film screenings have a chair and one or more panelists.

Advance Text Session: Substantial papers are offered online three weeks prior to the convention to be discussed in detail during the meeting. These sessions include a chair, the paper author who will make introductory comments for 5 minutes only, and one or more commentators, with a minimum of 45 minutes reserved for audience discussion.

Posted: December 20, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


New Approaches to Gender and Migration in the U.S. since 1900, A Graduate Symposium

The History Department at Bates College invited papers on the topic of gender and migration to and/or within the United States since 1900. Presentations will be part of a day-long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recent PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups. (African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.) Of special interest is work that considers gender and sexuality intersectionally with other markers of social difference; or that employs a transnational or translocal framework; or that raises the historic visibility of women migrants.

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Posted: December 15, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


New Badge Possibilities at the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting

With the well-meaning intent of creating networking opportunities, academic conferences ask that all attendees wear a name badge prominently displayed on their person. To further help attendees navigate the many faces and names, they also traditionally ask for each person's affiliation. The OAH Annual Meeting has been no exception.

The blog post 'Hey Academics, Please Stop Calling Me an "Independent Scholar"' by Megan Kate Nelson recently prompted an important conversation about the way in which we label ourselves, and thereby each other.  Conference attendees increasingly identify themselves as more than their affiliation, and those without a current affiliation increasingly feel on the outskirts of an ever-shrinking group.

We encourage all attendees to reconsider what they list on their badge during the registration process. We invite you to list your specialty, twitter handle, or, if you prefer, your affiliation. We want all our attendees to feel comfortable and to use the information on the badges of their peers to help build relationships and make new connections.

Join the conversation at OAH Crossroads or tweet us using #OAH18.
Register and update your badge here!

 

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Posted: October 10, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Jacob Dorn

The Department of History is saddened to share that Dr. Jacob H. Dorn, professor emeritus, passed away Tuesday morning after suffering a heart attack over the weekend. He was 77 years old. Jake retired in June 2012, after an extraordinary career of 47 years of teaching, scholarship, and service at Wright State and in the wider community.   

 

Jake was among the founding faculty of the University. He obtained his PhD. from the University of Oregon at the remarkably young age of 25. Shortly thereafter, he began teaching at what was then the Dayton campus of Ohio State and Miami Universities in 1965. He joined the faculty full time when the university became independent, and rose to the rank of full Professor by 1974. He taught American history, and specialized in social, intellectual and religious history, particularly in the Progressive Era. In 1972 he founded, and was the director for the next fifteen years, of the university's Honors Program. He oversaw countless senior and Master's theses. Generations of students considered him an outstanding teacher and mentor.

 

He was also an accomplished scholar. Jake was the author of Washington Gladden: Prophet of the Social Gospel (Ohio State University, 1967), just reprinted in paperback. He and his colleagues Carl M. Becker and Paul G. Merriam compiled A Bibliography of Sources for Dayton, Ohio, 1850-1950 (1971), funded by the National Science Foundation . He was the editor of a collection of essays, Socialism and Christianity in early 20th Century America (Greenwood Press, 1998). He was also the author of numerous articles, contributions and book reviews in a variety of scholarly journals and edited collections.

 

Jake believed strongly in selfless service to the university, the profession, and the wider community. He was deeply involved with the Ohio Academy of History, serving two terms as president and on virtually every committee. He was particularly active in the Dayton Council on World Affairs (DCOWA), served as a first reader with the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and was involved with the National Council on U.S./Arab Relations. He served on the board of the American Baptist Historical Society, with the Ohio Board for United Ministries in Higher Education, and with many, many other organizations. He gave of his time freely for innumerable presentations to community groups large and small. 

 

As one former colleague remembered, "I admired and appreciated Jake for his dignity, depth of scholarship, wisdom, and compassionate concern for people." As another stated, "Jake Dorn was the department." He will be missed by the faculty with whom he worked and the generations of students whom he taught. A memorial service in his memory will be held on Saturday, September 9, 2017 at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 125 N. Wilkinson St, Dayton, OH 45402 at 11:00 AM. A reception will follow. 

 

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that contributions be made to the Jacob H. Dorn Scholarship Fund. Checks made out to the Wright State University Foundation may be sent to the attention of Sara Woodhull, Wright State University Foundation, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton OH 45435 with a notation that they should be directed to the Dorn fund.

 

Jonathan Reed Winkler

Professor & Chair

Department of History

  

 

Posted: September 28, 2017
Tagged: In Memoriam


National Humanities Alliance Update

Thank you to all OAH members who wrote or called their members of congress to voice their concern about proposed cuts to the NEH earlier this year. The National Humanities Alliance (NHA), of which OAH is part, has prepared a report detailing their efforts and those to come. To read NHA Executive Director Steven Kidd's entire report, click here.

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Posted: September 28, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Profession


Ronald Schaffer

Ronald Schaffer, Professor of History Emeritus at California State University, Northridge, passed away on September 1 at age eighty-five. A Princeton Ph.D. and a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, he taught at Northridge from 1965 to 1999. His most important scholarly works were Wings of Judgment: American Bombing in World War II (1985) and America in the Great War: The Rise of the War Welfare State (1991), both published by Oxford University Press. His articles appeared in prominent scholarly journals, and he consulted extensively for public television. In recent years, he had been at work on a book about American aviators during World War I.

Posted: September 14, 2017
Tagged: In Memoriam