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Legal Transitions and the Vulnerable Subject: Fostering Resilience through Law’s Dynamis

There is a widespread perception that we live in a moment of change that is unprecedented in its scope and pace. Climate change, mass movements of dislocated persons, technological innovation, shifts in recognition of sexual and gender diversity, and new information networks challenge identities, institutions, and political coalitions. The law plays a critical role in creating and responding to change. A significant dimension of individuals’ and groups’ experience of change involves transformation in legal regulation. Relationships previously outside the law may gain recognition; the social insurance of risk may shift dramatically; entire legal status categories may disappear. As the law transforms, individuals and groups also transition across legal boundaries.

Vulnerability theory provides a framework for understanding how individuals and groups experience change, as they transition across legal categories. Vulnerability theory seeks to shift our understanding of law’s paradigmatic subject, from a static and autonomous one to a dynamic and socially embedded subject. The legal subject is not a universal adult but rather an evolving being who traverses across the life course from childhood to agedness, experiencing periods of heightened biological and derivative dependency along the way. Furthermore, both individuals and multiple social groupings are constantly susceptible to change in their ecological, economic, social, and political environments. Social institutions, including law, may form to promote human resilience—the capacity to adapt to change.

The purpose of this workshop will be to investigate how individuals’ and groups’ transitions between legal status categories expose vulnerability and also offer opportunities for fostering resilience. While legal scholarship often examines static legal categories, explaining how and why these categories privilege and advantage various individuals and groups, the movement of individuals and groups across legal categories itself deserves analysis. These transitions across legal categories—for example, from contracting strangers to corporate partners, non-married to married couples, employee to manager, insured to uninsured, incarcerated to released, or undocumented to documented—involve transformations in individual identity, relational dynamics, social networks, and institutional forms. The way in which law facilitates transitions itself will affect individuals’ and groups’ experience of legal change, as injurious or empowering, fair or unjust.

We invite papers that consider three main themes centered in the relationship between legal transition, vulnerability, and resilience. First, papers might consider how the movement between legal status categories transforms both individual and group identities and relationships. How does the process of change, itself, variously expose vulnerability and generate resilience? Second, papers may consider how legal categories and institutions change when law requires them to open their boundaries to individuals who do not conform to traditional norms. In this manner, the movement across legal status categories not only changes those in the process of transition but also fosters dynamism in institutions. Third, papers might examine how transitions in individuals’ and groups’ legal statuses reveal challenges and opportunities for achieving the just distribution of social, economic, and other benefits and advantages. How should law allocate the costs and benefits generated by the movement across legal status categories? 

We intend the workshop to cover a variety of topics ranging from corporate to family to healthcare to criminal law, among other arenas, and encourage the participation of scholars working in related historical, sociological, economic and other fields. 

Issues for discussion may include:

• How does the transition between legal status categories affect people, families, communities, and entities across a range of socio-legal axes? 
• What differences in transitions between legal status categories inhere depending on who is transitioning—individuals, entire communities, or corporate entities? 
• How are these differences informed by what is being sought or avoided? 
• What happens to existing legal categories in processes of legal transition? 
• How do those who undergo legal transitions change the institutions and categories they inhabit?
• What dynamism exists within legal frameworks as these legal transitions occur? 
• How does this dynamism, in turn, affect legal transition processes? 
• To what needs does the process of legal transition give rise, and how are these needs affected by socioeconomic factors?
• How might we allocate responsibility for costs and burdens of legal transition?
• How are status positions constructed and inhabited outside law and what opportunities and risks do these statuses entail? 
• How does the process of becoming a subject of law discipline social forms, and how do individuals and groups reorganize their social relationships as their legal statuses shift?
• What impacts do the processes of legal transition on the relationships that people, communities, and entities have with one another, other social groups, and the state?
• How do legal transition experiences differ depending on how transitions arise—whether they are seen as voluntary or coerced? Isolated, or numerous and repeated? 
• How we might understand the process of legal transition itself as a dynamic response to human and institutional vulnerability?
• How does the law respond to individuals and groups engaged in the process of transitioning between legal forms?
• How does legal regulation of the legal transition process variously reproduce, entrench, or construct vulnerability and resilience?
• What shared questions of theory and methodology can ground interdisciplinary approaches to legal transitions?
• Are there alternative metaphors to legal transition that may better capture the questions of risk, protection, autonomy, dependency, and equality that arise from the movement across boundaries of legal forms?

Workshop Contacts:
Deborah Dinner, deborah.dinner@emory.edu 

Suzanne Kim, skim@kinoy.rutgers.edu 

Martha Albertson Fineman, mlfinem@emory.edu 

Submission Procedure:
Email a proposal of several paragraphs as a Word or PDF document by July 21, 2017 to Rachel Ezrol, rezrol@emory.edu

Decisions will be made by August 4, 2017 and working paper drafts will be due November 15, 2017 so they can be duplicated and distributed prior to the Workshop. 
Workshop Details:

The Workshop begins Friday at 4PM in Gambrell 575 at Emory Law School. A dinner will follow the panel presentation session on Friday. Panel presentations continue on Saturday from 9:00 AM to 5PM; breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


From the OAH Executive Director Regarding NEH and President Trump’s FY18 Budget

As many of you already know, the humanities received two pieces of bad news this week. William "Bro" Adams, the chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, resigned on Monday, and President Donald Trump's FY18 budget was released with major cuts to and elimination of many programs. As Lee White, executive director of the National Coalition for History (NCH), notes, Congress controls appropriations, Trump's budget has already met with criticism on both sides of the aisle, and the process of passing a budget is lengthy and goes through a number of subcommittees.

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy


2018 OAH Annual Meeting Decisions Now Posted

Decisions for the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting in Sacramento, California, April 12-14, are now posted. If you were included in a proposal, please log into the OAH User portal. The notifications will be at the top of the user portal home page. If you have logged in and do not see your notice, please contact meetings@oah.org to ensure we are using your correct account information. All participants of a pending accept must complete their speaker agreement by July 1 to finalize their acceptance.

We look forward to a very exciting conference in 2018!

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: News of the Organization


Three National Monuments Under Review

Three Pacific Northwest National Monuments have been selected by the Department of the Interior for review--Hanford Reach (Washington), Cascade-Siskiyou (Oregon), and Craters of the Moon (Idaho). Public comment periods opened on May 12. For more information about the sites under review, please click here. Online comments can be submitted here.

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy


Canadian Journal of History/Annales canadiennes d'histoire - Linda F. Dietz Prize

Each year the Canadian Journal of History/Annales canadiennes d'histoire offers the Linda F. Dietz Prize--$500 and publication of the winning article. The prize is awarded to the best submission written in either French or English by a Canadian graduate student. The article must incorporate original research and meet the scholarly standards of the CJH/ACH. There are no chronological or geographical limits on the content; they welcome submissions from all fields of historical study. Submissions are assessed by the editor to evaluate eligibility prior to double-blind peer review.

Deadline: August 15, 2017. For more information, please visit the journal's website.

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


OAH Member Named One of 21 Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellows

Cyrus O'Brien, a student member of OAH, has been named one of 21 Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellows for 2017 at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. 

The Newcombe Fellowship is the nation’s largest and most prestigious award for Ph.D. candidates in the humanities and social sciences addressing questions of ethical and religious values. Each Fellow will receive a 12-month award of $25,000 to support their final year of dissertation work. 

Mr. O'Brien is completing his dissertation, titled Faith in Imprisonment: Religion and the Development of Mass Incarceration in Florida, in the Department of Anthropology and History at University of Michigan.

More information can be found here (woodrow.org/news/2017-newcombe- fellows-named/)

Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Clio's Kudos


Southern Quarterly Call for Papers: Foodway in the South

Submission deadline: December 1, 2017.

The Southern Quarterly invites submissions for a special issue on foodways in the South examining how food and drink (and the culture, literature, and practices surrounding them) express the character of the South. Materials may address this topic in any time period from the 16th to 21st centuries. Submit manuscripts online at www.usm.edu/soq, where guidelines and the full call for papers can also be found.

The Southern Quarterly is an internationally-known scholarly journal devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Southern arts and culture, including the Caribbean and Latin America.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Capitalist Transitions, Empire Building, and American History

Over the last decade there has been a resurgence of discussion about the concept of capitalism ranging from Occupy Wall Street's critiques of the uncontrolled recklessness of American finance capital to a burst of writings on the history of slavery and capitalism, and beyond. Yet there continues to be much confusion over what capitalism is in general, how to define it, and its role in American history. On a broader level this raises a series of questions going back to Marx and Weber, among others, over the transition to (or transitions to) capitalism and the uniqueness of capitalism as opposed to other historical social forms.

The purpose of this special issue is to explore this problematic through the lens of the history of American capitalist development and empire building. American capitalism developed in and through the history of the expansion of empire, destruction and displacement of native populations, remaking of ecological systems, construction of a social hierarchy organized along racial and gendered lines, making of class and state relations, and so on. It particular, it hopes to bring together scholars who are working on the edges of the boundaries of various popular or dominant paradigms and moving towards new ways of conceptualizing these issues and experimenting with perhaps more potentially risky but rewarding methodologies. In this context, authors are asked to address some aspects of the following questions in their papers:

● What exactly is capitalism, and what sort of methodological processes might we use to explain its concrete history? What might be problems with influential contemporary approaches to the question of capitalism's history over the last several decades?

● Did the United States go through its own historically specific 'transition' to capitalism? How did this occur? What were the forces behind it?

● Works on the history of American expansion and empire building are often separate from writings by, for example, social historians who have addressed the question of capitalism and labor. Given this, how, or how not, did processes of capitalist development, empire building, and labor formation operate together?

● Capitalism is also a form of social order organized along racial and gendered/patriarchal lines, and the rise of capitalism entailed a new relationship between humanity and ecology. How can our conceptions of capitalism and narratives of its history include these factors not as secondary or peripheral but central to the history of capitalist transition and development?

● The history of capitalism's rise and social normalization also was a history of resistance to capitalism. Thus how did these forces play out historically, and how did capital overcome resistance to its hegemony?

In addition to full papers of 7,000-8,000 words, sorter more specific pieces or review essays may also be considered. Authors must follow the Journal of Historical Sociology author guidelines: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-6443/homepage/ForAuthors.html.

For any inquiries (including discussing potential paper topics before writing a formal proposal) and to propose a paper please send an approximately 300 word abstract to special issue editor James Parisot at Jpariso1@binghamton.edu. The deadline for proposals is October 1st, 2017. Final papers will be due in September of 2018.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The Princeton & Slavery Project Symposium

The Princeton & Slavery Project, a scholarly investigation of Princeton University's historical engagement with the institution of slavery, will launch its website and host a scholarly symposium on November 17-18, 2017. Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison will deliver the keynote address. Other featured speakers include Project director Martha A. Sandweiss (Princeton University), Ruth Simmons (Brown University), Leslie Harris (Northwestern University), Eric Foner (Columbia University), and Danielle Allen (Harvard University).

Weekend events will also include McCarter Theater's world premiere of "The Princeton and Slavery Plays," seven newly-commissioned short plays based on historical documents uncovered as a part of the research project. Playwrights include: Nathan Alan Davis, Jackie Sibblies Drury, Dipika Guha, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins '06, Kwame Kwei-Armah, McCarter Artistic Director and Resident Playwright Emily Mann, and Regina Taylor.

In addition, the Princeton University Art Museum will host a public conversation with Titus Kaphar related to a new sculpture commissioned for the Project that explores the ways in which we create identity, racial structures, and economies in visual form. In the Museum's galleries, artworks from Kaphar's existing body of work will be featured in an exhibition that relates more broadly to representations of history in the United States, and in particular how African American identity is constructed and reinforced by their visual representation and/or absence in art.

Registration for the symposium will open in mid-September. Check back in the coming months for the most up-to-date information.

For More Information: https://slaverysymposium.princeton.edu/

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


NCPH 2018 Annual Meeting Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals – "Power Lines"
NCPH Annual Meeting – Las Vegas, Nevada, April 18-21, 2018

The call for proposals is open through July 15 at http://ncph.org/conference/2018-annual-meeting/
Access the full CFP at http://bit.ly/ncph2018CFP

Public historians want our work to matter. We use our skills at uncovering, sharing, facilitating, and collaborating to advance a vision of a rich, variegated collective past that contributes to shared interests in the present. For decade, "community" has been our catchphrase and our aspiration. How does our field's longstanding embrace of the collective stand up in a time of divineness? Do our commitments to individual agency, group identity, social justice, and civic engagement reinforce or strain against each other?
In drawing lines between past and present, delineating distinctive communities, and underlining the contributions of overlooked actors, how can public history bring us together and when does it pull us apart?

NCPH invites proposals for its 2018 conference that address the power of public history to define, cross, and blur boundary lines—work that explores public history's power in all its complexities, idealism, and, perhaps, unintended consequences.

Proposals are due by 11:59 PM local time on July 15, 2017.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Thomas K. McCraw Fellowship in U.S. Business History

This award honors the work and contributions of Thomas K. McCraw (1940-2012), who was Isidor Straus Professor of Business History at Harvard Business School. The fellowship enables established scholars from around the world whose primary interest is the business and economic history of the United States to spend time in residence at Harvard Business School. The main activities of the Thomas K. McCraw Fellow will be to conduct research in the archives of Baker Library or in other Boston-area libraries, present his or her work at a seminar, and interact with HBS faculty.

The Thomas K. McCraw Fellow will receive a stipend of $7,000 to cover travel and living expenses. Fellows are expected to be in residence for a minimum of two months. Recipients of the fellowship will receive work space, an e-mail account, a phone, a computer, an ID card, and access to the University's libraries and to the HBS Intranet for the duration of the appointment. Applicants should send a cover letter, a CV, and a two- to three-page research proposal to Walter A. Friedman via e-mail at wfriedman@hbs.edu. Applications for the fellowship should arrive no later than October 2, 2017. The applicant should also arrange for two letters of reference, sent directly by the recommender, to arrive at the above email address by October 2, 2017. The fellow will be announced by the beginning of November.

Harvard University is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

For More Information: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/fellowships/Pages/default.aspx

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Fellowships


Alfred D. Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History

The Alfred D. Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History Program invites established scholars in business history based outside the United States to spend a period of time in residence at Harvard Business School. The Chandler International Visiting Scholar is expected to interact with faculty and researchers, present work at research seminars, and conduct business history research.

Recipients will be given a $7,000 stipend (payable at the end of their visit), office space, an e-mail account, phone, computer, ID card, and access to the University's libraries and the HBS Intranet. The program requires a two-month minimum length of stay. Scholars may stay up to a maximum of six months. Applicants should indicate when, during the calendar year, they would like to be in residence at the School. It is expected that the recipient will be actively engaged in the intellectual life of the business history group. Applicants should send a cover letter, a CV, and a two- to three-page research proposal to Walter A. Friedman via e-mail at wfriedman@hbs.edu. Applications for the fellowship should arrive no later than October 2, 2017. The applicant should also arrange for two letters of reference, sent directly by the recommender, to arrive at the above email address by October 2, 2017. The visiting scholar will be announced by the beginning of November.

Harvard University is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

For More Information: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/fellowships/Pages/default.aspx

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Fellowships


Alfred D. Chandler Jr. Travel Grant

The purpose of this grant is to facilitate library and archival research in business or economic history. Individual grants range from $1,000 to $3,000. Three categories of applicants will be eligible for grants: 1) Harvard University graduate students in history, economics, or business administration, whose research requires travel to distant archives or repositories; 2) graduate students or nontenured faculty in those fields from other universities, in the U.S. and abroad, whose research requires travel to Baker Library and other local archives; and 3) Harvard College undergraduates writing senior theses in these fields whose research requires travel away from Cambridge.

To apply, send a CV, a summary of past academic research (of 1-2 pages), and a detailed description of the research you wish to undertake (of 2-3 pages). Applicants must indicate the amount of money requested (up to $3,000). Please also arrange to have one letter of reference sent via email directly from the recommender to Walter A. Friedman. The deadline for receipt of applications is November 1, 2017. All materials should be sent to Walter A. Friedman via e-mail at wfriedman@hbs.edu.

Harvard University is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

For More Information: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/fellowships/Pages/default.aspx

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Grants


Harvard-Newcomen Postdoctoral Fellowship in Business History

To be awarded for twelve months' residence, study, and research at Harvard Business School. The fellowship is open to scholars who, within the last ten years, have received a Ph.D. in history, economics, or a related discipline. The fellowship has two purposes: The first is to enable scholars to engage in research that will benefit from the resources of Harvard Business School and the larger Boston scholarly community. A travel fund and a book fund will be provided.

The second purpose is to provide an opportunity for the fellow to participate in the activities of Harvard Business School. This can take several forms. The fellow can research and write a case, under the direction of a senior faculty member, to be used in one of the business history courses. She or he might also organize a research conference under the auspices of the Business History Initiative, or assist the Initiative's ongoing projects in other ways. Finally, the fellow is strongly encouraged to submit an article to Business History Review during his or her year at the School. Applicants should submit a CV, undergraduate transcript and graduate-school record, thesis abstract, and writing sample (such as an article or a book chapter). Applicants should also state the topics, objectives, and design for the specific research to be undertaken. Finally, applicants should indicate the names of three people who will write references on their behalf. The three letters of recommend ation are to be submitted by the writers directly by October 16, 2017. It is the responsibility of the applicant to solicit these letters. The fellowship will be decided and all applicants notified by mid-January. The Fellowship will begin July 1, 2018. Applications should be received no later than October 16 and submitted online to: https://poplar.hbs.edu/ofr/register/registerApplicant.htm. Please direct your recommenders to visit: https://poplar.hbs.edu/ofr/upload/startUploadRecommendation.htm.

Harvard University is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

For More Information: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/fellowships/Pages/default.aspx

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Fellowships


IAS/School of Social Science Fellowships

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, invites about twenty scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science, law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy, literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground for roughly half the scholars; for 2018-19 the focus will be Crisis and Critique. The application deadline is November 1, 2017. Applications must be submitted through the Institute's online application system, which can be found, along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu.

Posted: May 2, 2017
Tagged: Fellowships


More than the Madeleine: Food in Memory and Ima

Claude Levi-Strauss posited that food has to be "good to think" before it is "good to eat." That contemplative moment of judgement compels us both to remember and to imagine, making the two processes an integral part of eating. Memory tells us what is safe (or not!) to eat, provides us with our culinary traditions, and is the source of our cravings. Imagination helps us to determine what to do when confronted with new substances that we have yet to classify as edible, desirable, nutritious, or delicious. Without imagination and adaptation our foodways would be predictable, boring, and static. While memory has to do with past experiences, the abiding, the familiar, and one's own cultural groups, imagination is about the future, the possible, the alien, the little known, and the other. Yet this culinary dichotomy is not so clear-cut: new foods are often made palatable by using familiar ingredients and techniques, as with sushi rolls filled with corned beef or cream cheese, for example. And not only are our memories imperfect, but they cannot account for change, whether newly developed preferences or foods that do not match up to our sensuously rich memories of them. Other foods, meanwhile, are forgotten or fail to stimulate the imagination.

This edited volume interrogates the process of our engagement with food through memory and imagination, be it in anticipation or remembrance of a meal. We wish to include work from a wide variety of disciplines that spans the globe and touches upon different periods in human history.

Potential themes may include:

Cultural constructions of collective food memories, nostalgic dishes, or imagined cuisines as tied to religion, nation, or class.
The use of memory or imagination in food advertising, literature, or art
The use of memory or imagination by chefs, on menus, or in kitchen/restaurant designs
Food scientists' approach to recreating flavors, inventing new tastes, etc.
Phenomenological perspectives on taste, the senses, and memory or imagination
Ways in which memory is disrupted, fragmented, or reimagined
Forgetting foods and culinary traditions
The reinterpretation / reimagination that occurs as foods circulate through time and space
Processes (historical, social, biophysical) whereby foods become edible / inedible, palatable / disgusting

We have interest from a well-respected publisher who has asked for a full proposal.

Please send 250-300 word abstract and 150 word bio to Dr. Beth Forrest and Dr. Greg de St. Maurice by July 15, 2017. Full manuscripts for accepted papers will be due in early spring 2018.

gregdestmaurice@gmail.com
beth.m.forrest@gmail.com

Dr. Greg de St. Maurice
Postdoctoral Fellow
Culinaria Research Center, University of Toronto
Air Liquide Research Fellow, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

Dr. Beth Forrest
Professor of Liberal Arts and Food Studies
Culinary Institute of America

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


American Journalism Historians Association

The American Journalism Historians Association invites paper entries, panel proposals, and abstracts of research in progress on any facet of media history for its 36th annual convention to be held October 12-14, 2017, in Little Rock, Arkansas. More information on the 2017 AJHA convention is available at ajhaonline.org.

The deadline for all submissions is June 1, 2017.

The AJHA views journalism history broadly, embracing print, broadcasting, advertising, public relations, and other forms of mass communication that have been inextricably intertwined with the human past. Because the AJHA requires presentation of original material, research papers and panels submitted to the convention should not have been submitted to or accepted by another convention or publication.

RESEARCH PAPERS

Authors may submit only one research paper. They also may submit one Research in Progress abstract but only on a significantly different topic. Research entries must be no longer than 25 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, not including notes. The Chicago Manual of Style is recommended but not required.

Papers must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please send the following:

Send papers to ajhapapers@gmail.com.

Authors of accepted papers must register for the convention and attend in order to present their research.

Accepted papers are eligible for several awards, including the following:
David Sloan Award for the outstanding faculty research paper ($250 prize).
Robert Lance Award for outstanding student research paper ($100 prize).
Jean Palmegiano Award for outstanding international/transnational journalism history research paper ($150 prize)
J. William Snorgrass Award for outstanding minority-journalism research paper.
Maurine Beasley Award for outstanding women's-history research paper.
Wally Eberhard Award for outstanding research in media and war.

Research Chair Michael Fuhlhage (michael.fuhlhage@wayne.edu) of Wayne State University is coordinating paper submissions. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their papers have been accepted.

PANELS

Preference will be given to proposals that involve the audience and panelists in meaningful discussion or debate on original topics relevant to journalism history. Preference also will be given to panels that present diverse perspectives on their topics. Entries must be no longer than three pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with one-inch margins. Panel participants must register for and attend the convention.

Panel proposals must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please include the following:

Send proposals to ajhapanels@gmail.com.

No individual may be on more than one panel. Panel organizers must make sure panelists have not agreed to serve on multiple panels. Panel organizers also must secure commitment from panelists to participate before submitting the proposal. Moderators are discussion facilitators and may not serve as panelists. Failure to adhere to the guidelines will lead to rejection of the proposal.

Panelists may submit a research paper and/or research in progress abstract.

Tracy Lucht (tlucht@iastate.edu) of Iowa State University is coordinating the panel competition. Authors of panel proposals will be notified in mid-July whether their panels have been accepted.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

The Research in Progress category is for work that will NOT be completed before the conference. Participants will give an overview of their research purpose and progress, not a paper presentation, as the category's purpose is to allow for discussion and feedback on work in progress. RIP authors may also submit a research paper on a significantly different topic.

For research in progress submissions, send a blind abstract of your study. Include the proposal title in the abstract. The abstract should include a clear purpose statement as well as a brief description of your primary sources. Abstracts must be no longer than two pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with 1-inch margins, excluding notes.

Primary sources should be described in detail in another double-spaced page.

Entries that do not follow these guidelines will be rejected.

The AJHA Research in Progress competition is administered electronically.

Send research in progress proposals to ajharip@gmail.com. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their proposals have been accepted.

Authors whose work is accepted must register for and attend the convention.

Melita Garza (melita.garza@tcu.edu) of Texas Christian University is coordinating the Research in Progress competition.

For More Information: https://ajha.wildapricot.org/2017call

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Historians Tell Their Stories: Family and Nation during the F.D.R. Years

In today's United States, the conflict between conservatives and progressives, traditionalists and modernists, dominates politics and regularly paralyzes the governing process. This divide can be traced back to various times in American history. During the periods comprising the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration (the Great Depression, New Deal, and to a lesser degree World War II) it was resurgent. Even today, a split remains between members of families for whom Roosevelt personified the devil and those for whom he was a true hero, for whom Eleanor Roosevelt was a traitor to conservative visions of womanhood and those for whom she was an independent and strong individual who served as role model for young professional women.

Seen through the dual prism that historians can bring to family history and national history, aspects of the Roosevelt presidency provide spaces in which the meaning of American conservativism and progressivism (with both small "p" and capital "P") can be explored. What light can historians shed on some of the origins of this rift through the telling of their family histories during the Roosevelt years? Where are the intersections between the professional work of historians and their memories of family life, or of stories handed down of family life, during the Roosevelt period?

One inspiration for this project comes from Roy Rosenzweig and David Thelen's 1998 The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life. Rosenzweig and Thelen uncovered what they called the American "popular historical consciousness at its most obvious source – the perspectives of a cross section of Americans." (5) In exploring attitudes towards professional history, they pointed out that Americans they interviewed "placed national events within their familial stories or made national personages into familiar figures in personal narrative.... Popular historical narratives veered off in different directions from the textbook narratives of linear progress associated with capital "H" history. Americans engaged larger pasts on their own terms." (116)

As professional historians are themselves members of the larger American public whose memories and attitudes Rosenzweig and Thelen investigated, this book will explore the connections historians create between past and present, family history, and the nation's history. How do professional historians tell family stories? What surprises does the telling reveal? How has their disciplinary perspective been affected by their family history? My hope is that historians will use their knowledge of history to broaden and place into context their family stories. This would illuminate both sides of the historical narrative, both national and familial. It would allow professional writers and teachers of history to share their personal pasts. It would also demonstrate that in spite of Rosenzweig and Thelen's finding that the general public has little taste or even use for professional history, perhaps historians do know how to tell a good story after all.

Proposals of no more than 300 words should be sent to Marie Bolton (Associate Professor of American History, University Clermont Auvergne/CHEC, France) at marie.bolton@uca.fr along with a brief cv by July 1, 2017.

Posted: April 25, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 National Underground Railroad Conference – Please Join Us!

The OAH is pleased to be partnering once again with the National Park Service's Network to Freedom Program to help support the NPS National Underground Railroad Conference.
This year's conference, "On the Edge of Freedom: Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad in the Borderlands," will be held in Cambridge, Maryland, May 18-21, 2017. 

Read More>>

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Posted: April 25, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession, News of the Organization, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Poland in the Heart of European History

Poland in the Heart of European History is open to professionally active history teachers and educators working at schools and other education institutions.

The Institute of National Remembrance covers accommodation costs, meals, museum tickets etc. Travel expenses will be reimbursed up to € 300. Insurance is not included.

Apply online at www.pamiec.pl/pheh until 28th of May 2017

Application results will be sent to all applicants on the 1st of June 2017.

For more information visit www.pamiec.pl/pheh or contact the coordinator: anna.brojer@ipn.gov.pl

Posted: April 20, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia