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Cornell University College of Human Ecology History of Home Economics Fellowship

The College of Human Ecology at Cornell University is accepting applications for the 2017 Dean's Fellowship in the History of Home Economics. To learn more about the history of the fellowship visit: http://www.human.cornell.edu/fellowship/fellowship_exhibit_home.cfm

We invite faculty members, research scholars, and advanced graduate students (must be eligible to work in the United States) with demonstrated background and experience in historical studies to apply for this post-graduate opportunity. The fellowship recipient will receive an award of $6,500 for a summer or sabbatical residency of approximately six weeks to use the unique resources available from the College and the Cornell University Library system in pursuit of scholarly research in the history of Home Economics and its impact on American society.

At the conclusion of the residency the fellowship recipient will provide a final report to the dean, including a bibliography of research pursued, and preservation recommendations for pertinent library and archival holdings. In addition, the recipient will be invited to give a public presentation on their research at a later date. Research projects should be intended for publication.

Relevant historical subject areas may include, but are not limited to: the role of women in the family and society, the history of women in higher education, the history of food, nutrition, housing, consumer economics, the family, child development, design, clothing and textiles among other key topics in American social history. We welcome applications in which the historical subject area may inform the investigation of contemporary societal issues.

The deadline for receipt of all application materials is Friday, March 3, 2017. For additional information, see: http://www.human.cornell.edu/fellowship/ Please circulate this announcement to your professional networks.

Posted: November 8, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


NCH Intervenes to Preserve History Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center

This summer, the NCH became aware that the history office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) was likely to be defunded and closed at the end of the 2016 fiscal year on September 30. The NCH working collaboratively with the OAH, the AHA and the Society for History in the Federal Government was able to convince NASA leadership to provide the funding necessary to keep the JSC office open with the resources it needs to be fully staffed and maintain the same excellent level of service to the historical community and the public. For more information, click here.

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession


The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities offers residential fellowships to scholars and writers in the humanities. 

All Fellows have private offices with access to photocopiers and printers, as well as University of Virginia faculty privileges, including daily delivery of library materials, access to recreational facilities, and invitations to lectures and events. 

Applicants should have completed most of their research before the start of the fellowship period which should be devoted primarily to writing. We do not support dissertation research or writing, and only occasionally award post-doctoral fellowships.

We welcome proposals on subjects with broad interest in any area of the humanities, including but not limited to the history, literature, folk life, and historical and contemporary cultures of Virginia and the South Atlantic United States.

The deadline each year is December 1 for the next academic year.

For more information, visit virginiahumanities.org or contact vfhfellowships@virginia.edu.

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


Summer Institute on Objects, Places and the Digital Humanities

June 19-23, 2017 & June 2018

The Summer Institute on Objects, Places, and the Digital Humanities at the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina will focus on the theory and practice of digital work for topics in art, architectural, urban history or material culture. The two-year Institute will provide "hands-on" training with tools for geospatial mapping, 3D modeling, photogrammetry, and data collection and visualization.

Participants will develop a digital component to a research project related to the lives of things as interrogations of meaning, circulation, and change over the long life of places and objects. Participants will examine how modeling, database and mapping tools can move research in new directions, reframing evidence towards new questions and expanding scholarship into new arenas of research and public outreach.

The workshop is intended for mid-career scholars engaged in research that can be expanded to include a digital dimension. No previous experience in digital scholarship required. The Institute will be led by Caroline Bruzelius and Mark Olson, both in the Department Art, Art History &Visual Studies and co-founders of the Wired! lab at Duke University. Application may be made until midnight February 21, 2015. Instructions are available via http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/digital-humanities/

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


The Normandy: Sacrifice for Freedom Albert H. Small Student & Teacher Institute

The Normandy: Sacrifice for Freedom® Albert H. Small Student & Teacher Institute takes students and teachers on the journey of a lifetime to explore WWII history through the life of a Silent Hero who is memorialized in the Normandy American Cemetery. This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. Albert H. Small.

Applications are now being accepted and it is free to apply:

• All applicants must be available June 17–29, 2017.
• All courses, materials, and overseas travel are covered for accepted teachers and students.
• Applications are due by November 30, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. ET.
• All participants must apply as one team.
• Students must be either a sophomore or junior in high school as of fall 2016.
• Teachers can be middle or high school teachers.
• All applications must be fully completed and submitted as a single PDF document.

For More Information: https://nhd.org/normandy-sacrifice-freedom

In June 2017, fifteen student/teacher teams will engage in a rigorous study of D-Day and World War II. Beginning in January, students and teachers will engage in an online class led by World War II historians, which includes weekly readings and online discussions with their peers. Additionally, teachers will aid students in the historical study of a Silent Hero buried in or memorialized at the Normandy American Cemetery whose story has not been previously told. With help from a research volunteer from the National Archives and Records Administration, students will research and learn about the life of a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, or Coast Guardsman in order to build a website once they return from France.

In June, the teams will travel to Washington, D.C., where the students and teachers will be immersed in lectures and activities presented by World War II historians and they will participate in a scholarly study of the war memorials in the D.C. area in order to understand the cost of war.

On the final leg of the journey, the group will travel to France and walk in the footsteps of history in Normandy. In addition to learning from local historians and curators, students will study and make presentations on various aspects of the Normandy Campaign that they have individually studied throughout the year. The Washington, D.C. and Normandy portions of the institute will require significant walking. Please be sure that you are able to walk up to two miles on uneven terrain, in variable weather. Please be aware that due to health issues this is a tobacco free trip.

The last day in Normandy will be a day of remembrance. The students will present a eulogy at the grave of a Silent Hero buried at the Normandy American Cemetery based on their individual research of a member of the U.S. military who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Teams will return to the U.S. together, teachers are required to return from France with their student and accompany them to their final destination. Once the teams return from France, teachers will help their students as they work to build their Silent Hero websites, which will be used to immortalize and pass on the memory of American sacrifice to later generations.

Please note that due to logistical arrangements, family members are not able to accompany the teams on the program.

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


Congress Creates Commission to Prepare for USA's 250th Anniversary

In July 2016, Congress passed legislation (Public Law 114-196) establishing the U.S. Semiquincentennial Commission to begin planning for the nation's 250th anniversary in 2026. NCH will be working to ensure qualified historians with expertise in the field are included on the commission. The commission will be comprised of 8 members of congress, 16 private citizens, and 8 federal officials. For more information, click here.

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


National Women's History Museum Commission Update

The American Museum of Women's History Congressional Commission is in the process of wrapping up its work. Over the past year, the commission has received input from historians with expertise in women's history and other stakeholders. A report to the President and Congress must be submitted by November 16, 2016. For more information, click here.

Posted: November 4, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


Agrarian Reform and Resistance: The Euro-American World, 1815-1914

Call for Papers for an International Conference on Agrarian Reform and Resistance in an 'Age of Globalization': The Euro-American World, 1815-1914

National University of Ireland, Galway
2-3 June 2017

The purpose of this conference is to explore the myriad experiences of agrarian reform and resistance that characterized rural regions of Europe and the Americas, whether based on either free or unfree labour, between 1815 and 1914. In this period, the economic changes associated with the influence of the Industrial Revolution transcended national boundaries, profoundly affecting rural societies by transforming patterns of demand for agricultural commodities. In response to these global processes, 'progressive' landowners, serfowners and slaveholders throughout the Euro-American world endeavoured to rationalize their management of land and labour while embracing scientific farming techniques and technological innovations. The resulting drives for 'improvement' and better market integration typically exacerbated the fundamental economic, political and social inequalities that prevailed in most agrarian regions. In all those regions, the proprietors' effor ts were often resisted by the diverse range of unfree and free labourers who produced agricultural commodities for sale on the world market, including slaves, serfs, sharecroppers, tenants and peasant proprietors. This conference welcomes scholars of rural Europe and the Americas to discuss the possibilities for comparative and transnational research within and between the different agrarian regions of the Euro-American world focusing on the above issues.

Scholars are invited to submit proposals for papers on agrarian reform and resistance, with a special emphasis on the following themes:

- Links between agricultural reformers and landed interests in the Euro-American world.
- Economic, political and social implications of agrarian modernization in local, national or international contexts.
- Strategies of resistance and radical developments among agricultural workers, free and/or unfree.
- The relationship between agricultural improvement and modernity/capitalism in free and unfree labour systems.
- Free and unfree workers' displacement and migration.

We invite prospective speakers of all career levels, including doctoral students, to submit abstracts for 20 minute papers. Each paper proposal should include a 250 word abstract and a one page CV. Please send to agrarianworldconference@gmail.com by the deadline of 6 January 2017.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Sven Beckert (Harvard University)

This conference is a joint initiative of Cathal Smith and Joe Regan at the Centre for the Investigation of Transnational Encounters (CITE) and the Irish Centre for the Histories of Labour and Class (ICHLC) and is hosted by the Moore Institute at the National University of Ireland, Galway.

Posted: November 2, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Tachau Teacher of the Year Award

DEADLINE: APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Mary K. Bonsteel Tachau Teacher of the Year Award is given annually by the Organization of American Historians in recognition of the contributions made by precollegiate teachers to improve history education within the field of American history. The award, to be given for activities which enhance the intellectual development of other history teachers and/or students, memorializes the career of Mary K. Bonsteel Tachau, University of Louisville, for her pathbreaking efforts to build bridges between university and precollegiate history teachers.

Read More>>

Read more >

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes, News of the Organization


Accepting Applications - Tyson Scholars of American Art

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art invites applications for the 2017-2018 Tyson Scholars of American Art Program. The residential program supports full-time scholarship in the history of American art, architecture, visual and material culture from the colonial period to the present. To support their research, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Housing is provided at the Crystal Bridges Farmhouse, within easy walking distance from the Museum via wooded trails and approximately 1.5 miles from downtown Bentonville. Scholars have private bed- and bathrooms in the house, and share comfortable indoor and outdoor common spaces including an expansive yard, patio, and swimming pool.

The program is open to scholars holding a PhD (or equivalent) as well as to PhD candidates. Applicants may be affiliated with a university, museum, or independent. Scholars will be selected on the basis of their potential to advance understanding of American art and to intersect meaningfully with aspects of Crystal Bridges' collections, architecture, or landscape. Projects with a synthetic, interdisciplinary focus that seek to expand boundaries of research or traditional categories of investigation are particularly encouraged. Up to three Scholars may be in residence at a time, with terms ranging from six weeks to nine months. In addition to housing, Scholars are provided office or carrel space in the curatorial wing of Crystal Bridges' Library. Stipends vary depending on the duration of residency, ranging from $15,000 to $30,000 per semester. Additional funds for research travel during the residency period are available upon application.

Further information about the Tyson Scholars Program, application instructions, and application form can be found at http://crystalbridges.org/tyson-scholars/. Applicants are advised to contact Crystal Bridges' curators and librarians for specific details about the Museum's collections related to their research. The application deadline for any proposed length of term during the 2017–2018 academic year is January 13, 2017.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


2017 John Wesley Powell Prize

The Society for History in the Federal Government invites nominations for the 2017 John Wesley Powell Prize, deadline November 30, 2016. The Powell Prize commemorates the explorer and federal administrator whose work demonstrated early recognition of the importance of historic preservation and historical display.

The John Wesley Powell Prize alternates annually in recognizing excellence in the fields of historic preservation and historical displays. In 2017, the prize will be awarded to either an individual or to principal collaborators for a single major historic display or exhibit project completed in 2015 or 2016. The award for historic display is given for any form of interpretive historical presentation including, but not limited to, museum exhibits, historical films, CD/DVDs, websites, or multi-media displays. The winner will be announced in the spring of 2017 at the annual meeting of the SHFG. Eligible entrants include any agency or unit of the federal government or non-governmental organizations, including federal contractors, conducting eligible activities on behalf of a unit of the federal government.

For More Information: http://shfg.org/shfg/awards/awards-requirements/

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


Franklin Research Grants 2016-2017

The American Philosophical Society invites scholars holding the Ph.D. to apply to its program of small grants that support the cost of research leading to publication in all areas of knowledge. The Franklin program is particularly designed to help meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses.

Awards range from $1,000 to $6,000, and the 2016 deadline is December 1.

For further details and application instructions, please visit www.amphilsoc.org/grants/franklin or contact Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, at LMusumeci@amphilsoc.org or 215-440-3429.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Grants


Phillips Fund for Native American Research

The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada. The grants are intended for such costs as travel, tapes, films, and consultants' fees but not for the purchase of books or permanent equipment.

The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on masters theses or doctoral dissertations. The average award is about $3,000; grants do not exceed $3,500. Grants are given for one year following the date of the award.

The application deadline is March 1, 2017.

For further details and application instructions, please visit www.amphilsoc.org/grants/phillips or contact Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, at LMusumeci@amphilsoc.org or 215-440-3429.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Grants


American Philosophical Society Library Resident Research Fellowship

The American Philosophical Society Library offers short-term residential fellowships for conducting research in its collections. We are a leading international center for research in the history of American science and technology and its European roots, as well as early American history and culture.

Applicants may be holders of the Ph.D. or its equivalent, Ph.D. candidates who have passed their preliminary examinations, or independent scholars.

Applicants in any relevant field of scholarship may apply. Candidates who live 75 or more miles from Philadelphia receive some preference.

A stipend of $3,000 per month is awarded for a minimum of one month and a maximum of three months.

The application deadline is March 1, 2017.

For further details and application instructions, please visit www.amphilsoc.org/library/short-term-fellowships or contact LibFellows@amphilsoc.org or 215-440-3443.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


2018 Quatuor Coronati Conference: Freemasons in the Transatlantic Worlds during the long eighteenth century

September 14-16, 2018. Alexandria, Virginia, George Washington Masonic National Memorial.

The Academic Committee of the 2018 Quatuor Coronati Conference, co-sponsored by Quatuor Coronati Masonic Lodge No. 2076 of the United Grand Lodge of England, and the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, invite proposals for papers presenting new research in the form of biographical or prosopographical findings in the history of Anglo-American Freemasonry during the long eighteenth century, including studies of freemasons in or from Britain, Ireland, all of North America and the Caribbean. Early and mid-career academics are particularly encouraged to apply, though proposals from senior and independent scholars are also welcomed.

Abstracts/proposals of up to 500 words along with a brief CV should be submitted in the body of an email to: susan.sommers@stvincent.edu with "QC 2018" in the subject line. The closing date for submissions is May 1, 2017.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The Mary Baker Eddy Library Fellowship

The Mary Baker Eddy Library in Boston is now accepting online applications for our Summer 2017 Research Fellowships. The fellowship program is open to academic scholars, independent researchers, and graduate students. The collections center on the papers of Mary Baker Eddy and records documenting the history of Christian Science. Areas of research may include women's history, spirituality and health, religious studies, nineteenth-century history, architecture, journalism, and others. Stipend provided. Apply at our website by February 6, 2017. For further information regarding Library collections and the fellowship program, please visit http://www.marybakereddylibrary.org/fellowships or contact 617-450-7124, fellowships@mbelibrary.org.

For More Information: http://www.marybakereddylibrary.org/research/fellows/

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


Nancy Weiss Malkiel Scholars Award

The Nancy Weiss Malkiel Scholars Award Program is now accepting applications through December 15, 2016. This opportunity is for tenure-track faculty who are committed not only to research and teaching but also to building a more inclusive scholarly community. Applicants may not be going up for tenure during the award year (2017–18).

Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Malkiel Scholars Award offers a $17,500 stipend—$10,000 to be used for summer research support and $7,500 for research assistance during the academic year. While Malkiel Scholars may be working in any field of the humanities or social sciences, preference will be given to those whose work relates to 20th- and 21st-century American history, politics, culture, and society, with emphases including but not limited to African American issues, women's issues, and/or higher education.

Additional information is available at www.woodrow.org/nwm.

To download a one page brochure click here.

Posted: October 25, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


2017 HABS/SAH Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship for Student Architectural Historians

Attention Student Architectural Historians!

Spend your summer conducting research on a nationally significant U.S. building or site and preparing a history to become part of the permanent HABS collection. The HABS/SAH Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship, a joint program of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) and the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH), permits a graduate student in architectural history or a related field to work on a 12-week HABS history project during the summer of 2017. The Fellow's research interests and goals will inform the building or site selected for documentation by HABS staff. HABS is a program of the National Park Service and the Fellow is usually stationed at our Washington, DC office. The award consists of a $10,000 stipend, and SAH conference registration and travel expenses up to $1,000.

Please visit our website for application instructions.

For More Information: http://www.nps.gov/hdp/jobs/tompkins.htm

Application Deadline - Dec. 31, 2016.

Posted: October 25, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


Legacies of the Manhattan Project at 75 Years

The Manhattan Project was, arguably, the defining event of the twentieth century. More even than the Second World War itself, the Manhattan Project and its Cold War legacy altered the course of world history. For decades shrouded in secrecy and nourished by fear, we are only now—some seventy-five years on—beginning to understand the full effects of that event and its complex aftermath.

Predictably, then, the various legacies of the Manhattan Project have been central to a remarkably diverse and cross-disciplinary body of scholarship. Moreover, ongoing declassification of Manhattan Project-era materials and opening of archives has allowed access to new sources that have forced reevaluations of key decisions and outcomes in virtually every field of research touching on the atomic and nuclear age.

"Legacies of the Manhattan Project" will bring these disparate academic conversations together at a key moment for understanding the origins and consequences of our nuclear past, present, and future.

We invite papers that deal with any aspect of this topic, regardless of disciplinary perspective. Possible themes include (but are not limited to) reconsiderations of

· the rise of the military-industrial complex
· the history of science and technology
· the sociology and politics of the Cold War
· environmental impacts and waste remediation
· literatures of the environment
· the impact of technology on the American West and its
indigenous and settler cultures.

We welcome submissions from both established and emerging scholars for 20 minute panel papers, panel proposals of 3-4 panelists, and plenary sessions of no more than 60 minutes.

Please direct abstracts (not to exceed 250 words) and inquiries to ourhanfordhistory@tricity.wsu.edu no later than January 6, 2017.

For More Information: http://www.tricities.wsu.edu/hanfordhistory

Posted: October 19, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Massachusetts Historical Society Fellowships

The first of our deadlines, for MHS-NEH support, is January 15, 2017!

The Massachusetts Historical Society will offer more than three dozen research fellowships for the academic year 2017-2018, including two MHS-NEH Long-term Fellowships made possible by an award from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The stipend, governed by an NEH formula, is $4,200 per month for a minimum of four months and a maximum of twelve months. The Society adds a monthly supplement, payable directly to the MHS-NEH Fellow, of $562.50.

MHS Short-term Fellowships carry a stipend of $2,000 to support four or more weeks of research in the Society's collections. The Boston Athenaeum and the MHS will offer one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, its Origins, and Consequences for at least four weeks at each institution. This fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000. The Society also participates in the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium of twenty-two organizations. These grants provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research conducted at three or more participating institutions.

For more information, please visit www.masshist.org/research/fellowships, email fellowships@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568. MHS-NEH application deadline: January 15, 2017. New England Regional Fellowship Consortium deadline: February 1, 2017. Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship deadline: February 15, 2017. MHS Short-term Fellowship deadline: March 1, 2017.

Posted: October 19, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships