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News in American History

The Germany Residency Program

DEADLINE: APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY OCTOBER 3, 2016.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the OAH International Committee is pleased to announce the continuation of the Residency Program in American History—Germany (Germany Residency Program) at the University of Tübingen.

The committee seeks applications from OAH members who are established scholars affiliated with an American or Canadian University interested in leading an advanced undergraduate/graduate student seminar focusing on one aspect of U.S. History.

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Posted: September 18, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization


The Japan Residencies Program

Deadline: Applications must be submitted by October 3, 2016.

In cooperation with and support from the Japan-United States Friendship Commission, the OAH and the Japanese Association for American Studies (JAAS) plan to send two American scholars to Japanese universities for two-week residencies in the summer of 2017, pending funding.

The committee seeks applications from OAH members who are established American scholars affiliated with an American or Canadian university interested in teaching advanced undergraduates and graduate students in seminars and courses focusing on the U.S. History topics requested by the host institutions.

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Posted: September 17, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization


Friend of History Award

NOMINATION DEADLINE: October 3, 2016

First given in 2005, the Friend of History Award recognizes an institution or organization, or an individual working primarily outside college or university settings, for outstanding support of historical research, the public presentation of American history, or the work of the OAH. Recipients will be selected by the OAH Executive Committee from nominations that should include a statement of no more than five pages describing the nominee's distinguished contributions and, if for an individual, a CV of no more than five pages.

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Posted: September 16, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization


The Department of Black Studies, University of Missouri: 2016 Black Studies Fall Conference

On October 14-15, 2016, the Department of Black Studies, University of Missouri, Columbia campus, will host its annual Black Studies Fall Conference to explore the theme of Black Resistance in the Americas: Slavery and its Aftermath. This event is FREE and Open to the public. The keynote address, "We Fight!" Red Tails, Black Soldiers, and the Civil Rights Movement will be given by OAH Distinguished Lecturer Prof. Carol Anderson, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor and Chair of African American Studies, Emory University, Atlanta.

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Posted: September 16, 2016
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


America in Class Webinars

The Organization of American Historians is partnering with the National Humanities Center to provide a free webinar for educators entitled "Teaching the Great Depression with John Steinbeck" as part of the Center's America in Class series. The webinar, held on April 13, 2017, will be 90-minutes long and will be delivered by OAH Distinguished Lecturer David Wrobel. 

CEU credit is available upon completion. Virtual seats for the webinar are limited. Educators can use the following link to sign up for this webinar or any others in the year long America in Class series, September 2016 through April 2017: http://americainclass.org/webinars/

Posted: September 16, 2016
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Call for Entries: SHFG Thomas Jefferson Prize

The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) seeks entries for its 2017 Thomas Jefferson Prize for documentary histories published in 2015 or 2016. The prize recognizes the editor(s) of a single volume or one or more volumes in a project that contributes significantly to the understanding of the history of the federal government. It will be awarded at the SHFG annual meeting in Spring 2017. See www.shfg.org for a list of past winners and general requirements for all SHFG prizes.

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Posted: September 7, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


Immigration and Ethnic History Society George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award

The Immigration and Ethnic History Society Announces competition for the 2016 George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award. It invites applications from any Ph.D. candidate who will have completed qualifying exams by December 15, 2016, and whose thesis focuses on American immigration, emigration, or ethnic history. The award provides two grants of $1000 each for expenses to be incurred in researching the dissertation. Applicants must submit a three-page to five-page descriptive proposal in English discussing the significance of the work, the methodology, sources, and collections to be consulted. Also included must be a proposed budget, a brief curriculum vitae, and a supporting letter from the major advisor. To be considered for the award, all applicants must submit their materials via email to all committee members by December 15, 2016.

Committee Members for the George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award:

Hidetaka Hirota (Chair of the Committee) hhirota@ccny.cuny.edu

Michael Bustamante, mbustama@fiu.edu

Leigh Ann Wilson, lawilson@brandman.edu

For More Information: http://iehs.org/online/george-e-pozzetta-dissertation-award/

Posted: September 6, 2016
Tagged: Grants


Peter K. New Student Research Competition/Award

The Society for Applied Anthropology sponsors an annual research competition for students (graduate and undergraduate) in the social and behavioral sciences.

Three cash prizes will be awarded:

In addition, each of the three winners will receive travel funds ($350) to attend the annual meeting of SfAA (in Santa Fe, NM, in March, 2017). A Baccarat crystal trophy will be presented to the first place winner.

The competition and award honors the late Peter Kong-ming New, a distinguished medical sociologist-anthropologist. The deadline for receipt of submissions is December 31, 2016.

Please go to the SfAA web site (https://www.sfaa.net/about/prizes/student-awards/peter-new/) for additional information on the New Competition and Award.

Posted: September 6, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


100th Anniversary of National Parks Service

Happy 100th Birthday to the National Park Service! They are celebrating with free admission to all National Parks August 25th through August 28th. Get out and #FindYourPark / #EncuentraTuParque!

For more information, visit their site - https://www.nps.gov/subjects/centennial/birthday-invitation.htm

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Posted: August 25, 2016
Tagged: Miscellaneous


Civil War Governors of Kentucky Seeks Graduate Research Associates 2016-17

The Kentucky Historical Society seeks eight Graduate Research Associates (GRAs) familiar with 19th century United States history to write short informational entries for the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition (CWG-K). GRAs will receive a stipend of $5,000 each and can work remotely from their home institutions.

Each GRA will annotate 150 assigned documents each. Each GRA must be a graduate student in at least the second year of a M.A. program in history or a related humanities discipline. Preference will be given to candidates who are enrolled in graduate programs at Kentucky universities, though applicants worldwide are encouraged to apply. The stipends are funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a branch of the National Archives.

Visit this link (http://civilwargovernors.org/graduate-research-associates-2016-17/) for more information and application instructions, or contact Tony Curtis at tony.curtis@ky.gov.

CWG-K is an annotated, searchable, and freely-accessible online edition of documents associated with the chief executives of the commonwealth, 1860-1865. Yet CWG-K is not solely about the five governors; it is about reconstructing the lost lives and voices of tens of thousands of Kentuckians who interacted with the office of the governor during the war years. CWG-K will identify, research, and link together every person, place, and organization found in its documents. This web of hundreds of thousands of networked nodes will dramatically expand the number of actors in Kentucky and U.S. history, show scholars new patterns and hidden relationships, and recognize the humanity and agency of historically marginalized people. To see the project's work to date, visit discovery.civilwargovernors.org.

Posted: August 24, 2016
Tagged: Miscellaneous


The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Freedom

A conference in the Ethyle R. Wolfe Series on Classical Studies and the Contemporary World
May 19-20, 2017
Brooklyn College, City University of New York

The rhetorics of freedom and liberty permeate the political discourse of the present and Greco-Roman antiquity. Speakers judge this language and its associated symbols positively, and assume their audiences do as well. But the principles defining freedom, and its associated values, can and do shift dramatically from one context to another. In short we can all agree freedom is good, but we cannot agree what it means to be free. One of the key sites of contention is who needs to sacrifice what in order to achieve liberty and what costs must be paid to preserve freedom. The pursuit of liberty is directly linked to whose freedom matters as well as who bears - and who is assumed to bear - the associated costs. All of this is especially true any discussion of slavery.

This conference will bring scholars from numerous disciplines into conversation across the historical timeline to examine how debt, value and payment work to create freedom, liberty and slavery. Although these are slippery concepts, rather than simply viewing these terms as rhetorical devices that make freedom seem worthwhile, we deploy debt, value, and payment as analytical tools for understanding why slavery harms and why freedom matters. Because various discourses - ranging from religion to science and from ethics to economics - use these terms to describe freedom, whether as physical labor or a mental activity, we will also investigate debt, value and payment themselves. Often our methods of assessments bleed one into another, especially in conversations regarding individual and shared liberties.

By juxtaposing the different methodologies scholars use to ask "what does freedom cost?" from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present, we will explore overlapping areas of research and expand the existing conversations in each discipline. In addition to providing vocabularies, practices and theories of freedom that we still use today, Ancient Greece and Rome provide many examples of peoples who lacked freedom but strove for it, including slaves, women and conquered peoples. By examining Greco-Roman antiquity and modernity, we bring to light recurrent historical patterns of the costs that people have and continue pay for freedom.

Our ultimate goal is to produce a rigorous edited volume of the most substantial and unified conference contributions for publication by a major university press.
Our confirmed keynote speakers include, Orlando Patterson (John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Harvard University), Saidiya Hartman (Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University) and Deborah Kamen (Associate Professor, Classics, University of Washington). We are seeking contributions for at least four panels of 3-4 participants each. We hope to attract participation from a wide range of academic disciplines and from scholars at all levels, and will try to reflect this diversity in our creation of each broad panel. Examples of possible panel titles might be: "Themes of Freedom and Payment in the Novel", "The Economics of Emancipation", "Cross-Cultural Political Theories of Sacrifices and Liberty", "Comparative Histories of Debt-Bondage", or "The Shifting Demographics of Civil Liberties".

We will be offering a minimum of six bursaries of up to 500 dollars to be awarded on the basis of greatest need, taking into account access to institutional funding and the distance of the conference from the participant's home institution.

October 31, 2016 is the deadline for the submission of abstracts. Please include the following as separate files: (1) title, abstract of 300-500 words, a one page bibliography (no self identifying information please!); (2) your name, title of your proposed talk, institutional affiliation, short academic biography, and an indication of whether you would like to be consider for a bursary, a budget for the amount requested, and any information we should take into consideration when making our bursary allocations.

These two files (PDF or MSWord preferred) should be sent to: c-f-p@debtandslavery.com

General questions on this conference should be sent to: queries@debtandslavery.com

We hope to notify successful applicants by November 15.

March 31, 2017 will be the deadline for submission of draft papers for pre-circulation among fellow panelists and organizers.

We will also invite poster submissions from undergraduates conducting research on related themes; the deadline for poster proposals will be March 1, 2017.

Please note that deadlines are subject to change. For the most recent announcements about deadlines, see our website: https://debtandslavery.com/

Posted: August 18, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


WashU Libraries Film & Media Archive Acquires Paradigm Productions Collection

Washington University Libraries' Film & Media Archive has acquired materials related to two films produced by independent documentary company Paradigm Productions. The donation of 53 boxes includes original interviews, photographs, b-roll footage, and research files for two of Paradigm's films, The Good War and Those Who Refused to Fight It (2000) and Race Is the Place (2005).

Co-directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Tejada-Flores, The Good War and Those Who Refused to Fight It uncovers the history of American conscientious objectors during World War II, whose nonconformist beliefs resulted in widespread public ridicule, endangerment, and sometimes imprisonment. The PBS-aired film, narrated by actor Ed Asner and featuring interviews with conscientious objectors, received the Organization of American Historians' Erik Barnouw Award for historical filmmaking and the American Historical Association's John E. O'Connor Film Award.

Race Is the Place, directed by Raymond Telles and Tejada-Flores, explores the contours of race, creative expression, and presentation via interviews and performances by such significant names as Amiri Baraka, Michael Franti, Faith Ringgold, Culture Clash, and Mayda del Valle. The documentary premiered on the Emmy Award-winning PBS series Independent Lens in November 2005.

Located in Berkeley, California, Paradigm Productions was founded in 1990 by filmmakers Tejada-Flores and Telles. It produces progressive documentary films with a sensitivity to issues of social justice and inclusion.

Tejada-Flores has worked in television since 1969 and has directed documentaries on such diverse topics as lowriding culture, farmworkers' rights in Honduras, and the life of famous Mexican artist Diego Rivera. He also co-directed The Fight in the Fields (1997), which many consider to be the definitive documentary on civil rights activist and organizer Cesar Chavez. Tejada-Flores also served as a producer for the PBS series The Great Depression (1992), a documentary series that is housed in the Film & Media Archive as part of the Henry Hampton Collection. Tejada-Flores has been the recipient of a CINE Golden Eagle and a James Phelan Award for Video.

Telles has spent 25 years in documentary film and television, during which he has produced and directed for Dateline, Nightline, and PBS. He has produced and directed over 30 documentaries, including The Fight in the Fields, which screened in competition at the Sundance Film Festival in 1997 and aired on PBS. Telles has received many awards, including three Emmy Awards and two CINE Golden Eagles.

All materials in the Paradigm Productions Collection will be available for research to faculty, students, and the public on-site in the Washington University Libraries. Select materials also will be made available online.

About the Film & Media Archive
A unit of Washington University Libraries, the Film & Media Archive collects, preserves, and makes accessible documentary film and other media that chronicle political and social injustice of the 20th century and beyond with an emphasis on the African American experience. The Archive also preserves the documentary filmmaking process in its entirety through the acquisition of production elements and supporting materials, such as original filmed interviews and outtakes, rare stock footage, photographs, producers' research and notes, treatments, scripts, storyboards, and correspondence.

The Archive holds 6,500,000 feet of film, 1,300 linear feet of manuscripts, nearly 20,000 videotapes, over 10,000 audiotapes and reels, and a significant library of books, CDs and DVDs.

The Archive was established in 2001 after the Libraries acquired the collections of Blackside Inc., the largest African-American-owned film production company of its day. Founded by Washington University alumnus Henry Hampton, Blackside produced films on civil rights, democracy, and the arts, including the award-winning series Eyes on the Prize.

For more information, contact Brian Woodman, Curator of Film & Media Archive, at (314) 935-3301 or woodmanb@wustl.edu, or go to http://library.wustl.edu/washington-university-libraries-film-media-archive-acquires-paradigm-productions-collection/

Posted: August 15, 2016
Tagged: Miscellaneous


WashU Libraries Film & Media Archive Completes Preservation of ‘More Than One Thing’

Washington University Libraries' Film & Media Archive has successfully completed the preservation of the rare short film More Than One Thing (1969). The project was completed with the support of a Basic Preservation Grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF).

More Than One Thing, directed by Washington University MFA student Steven Carver, tells of the dreams and aspirations of Billy Towns, an African American teenager growing up in the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing project. The film features gorgeous black and white imagery of Pruitt-Igoe and the surrounding environment, as well as the personal reflections of young Billy via narration. The Archive houses the only existing prints of the film, donated by the filmmaker. The preservation project resulted in the generation of a 16mm duplicate negative, 16mm full-coat magnetic track, 16mm negative optical track, 16mm composite print, a digital HD transfer, and a Blu-ray access copy.

Footage from the film was used extensively in the award-winning documentary The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (2011). The newly preserved film will be featured as part of St. Louis International Film Festival in November 2016.

Carver went on to a successful career in filmmaking and photography, directing such movies as Big Bad Mama (1974) and Lone Wolf McQuade (1983). Carver now owns and operates Image Studios Lab & Darkroom in Los Angeles.

Access copies of More Than One Thing also will be available for loan to outside institutions to screen the film for educational purposes.

About the Film & Media Archive
A unit of Washington University Libraries, the Film & Media Archive collects, preserves, and makes accessible documentary film and other media that chronicle political and social injustice of the 20th century and beyond with an emphasis on the African American experience. The Archive also preserves the documentary filmmaking process in its entirety through the acquisition of production elements and supporting materials, such as original filmed interviews and outtakes, rare stock footage, photographs, producers' research and notes, treatments, scripts, storyboards, and correspondence.

The Archive holds 6,500,000 feet of film, 1,300 linear feet of manuscripts, nearly 20,000 videotapes, over 10,000 audiotapes and reels, and a significant library of books, CDs and DVDs.

The Archive was established in 2001 after the Libraries acquired the collections of Blackside Inc., the largest African-American-owned film production company of its day. Founded by Washington University alumnus Henry Hampton, Blackside produced films on civil rights, democracy, and the arts, including the award-winning series Eyes on the Prize.

For more information, contact Brian Woodman, Curator of Film & Media Archive, at (314) 935-3301 or woodmanb@wustl.edu

Posted: August 10, 2016
Tagged: Grants


NEH Announces $79 Million for Nearly 300 Humanities Projects and Programs Nationwide

In its 50th anniversary year, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced $79 million in grants for 290 humanities projects and programs across the United States. The grants will be awarded in 14 humanities fields or areas and also include $42.8 million in annual operating support for the national network of state and local humanities councils.

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Posted: August 10, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


OAH Mourns the Passing of Allan G. Bogue

The OAH is saddened to learn of the passing of Allan G. Bogue. He died on August 1, 2016 at the age of 95. He served as president of the Organization of American Historians from 1982 to 1983.

Bogue was born May 12, 1921. He was as a Lecturer in Economics and History at the University of Ontario, 1949-1952; an Assistant Professor at State University of Iowa, and the Chair of the Department of History, State University of Iowa, 1959-1963. In 1964 he became a Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 1968 he became the Frederick Jackson Turner Professor of History, a position he held until his retirement in 1991. He was Chairman of the History Department from 1972-1973. He also served as a visiting professor at various universities including the Thord-Gray Lecturing Fellow, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1968 and in 1971-1972, was a visiting professor at Harvard University.

Bogue has won numerous awards for his work including, a Guggenheim Fellowship, 1970, Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Fellow (Cal Tech), 1975. He was elected and inducted into the National Academy of Sciences, 1985-1986 and shared in the Caughey Prize for best book in Western American history in previous year, 1995. He wrote 7 books including From Prairie to Corn Belt: Farming on the Illinois and Iowa Prairies in the Nineteenth Century, 1963, and Frederick Jackson Turner: Strange Roads Going Down, 1998. He also collaborated on 12 other books and published 73 articles during his career.

He was a fellow of the Agricultural History Society, an honorary life member of the Western History Association, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Margaret Bogue, Professor Emerita of the History Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison and three daughters.

Allan Bogue's full obituary can be read here.

Posted: August 8, 2016
Tagged: In Memoriam


Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

We are delighted to announce that Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is now accepting submissions for our premiere issue to be published in Spring 2017. A semiannual peer-reviewed publication from the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS will be available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries' relationships with their unique environments. LCHS brings together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library workers and users. There are no limits of time and space, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, and academic libraries, special collections and manuscripts). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women's Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 1, issue 1, are due August 29, 2016.

Manuscripts may be submitted electronically through LCHS's Editorial Manager system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/default.aspx. They must also conform to the instructions for authors at http://bit.ly/LCHScfp1.

We are excited to see this journal become a reality and welcome your thoughts (and submissions!) as we create a new platform for studying libraries within their broader humanistic and social contexts.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

Posted: August 3, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


A Workshop on Legal Migrations, Vulnerability, and Resilience

Dec. 9-10 2016, Emory University

This workshop will interrogate the experience of traversing borders between legal forms through the lens of vulnerability theory. Contemporary legal scholarship most often devotes attention to status categories conceived as static positions of relative privilege or disadvantage. Vulnerability theory, which challenges the dominant conception of the universal politico-legal subject as an autonomous, independent, and static adult, shifts us toward a dynamic lens of analysis. Vulnerability theory focuses on the evolution of human needs across a life course, asking how law does and should respond to dependence and foster resilience over time. The theory recognizes that human beings are constantly susceptible to change, positive and negative, in our bodily, social, and environmental circumstances. This workshop will explore how we might understand the processes of 'legal migration' as dynamic responses to human and institutional vulnerability.

We are concerned, in particular, with legal migration processes as opportunities to foster resilience. Vulnerability is both universal and constant. Resilience, by contrast, may be created and fostered by the distribution of assets: social, political, environmental, economic, and cultural. The workshop asks how law might foster resilience as individuals and groups migrate between legal forms. In what ways does this migration foster resilience, reorder dependencies, or expose different forms of vulnerability? How do "legal migrants" change the institutions and categories they inhabit? The advent of same-sex marriage, for example, provides the occasion to study the migration of tens of thousands of couples from civil unions or a status of legal non-recognition to the privileged status of marriage. We invite scholars to consider multiple experiences of legal migration: from non-married to married; child to adult; not guilty to guilty; migrant to asylum seeker and possibly ci tizen; contractual agents to partners; union member to sovereign nation.

We encourage participation from scholars in multiple disciplines including law, the social sciences, and humanities, and welcome papers which address the response to human and institutional vulnerability occasioned by processes of migration. Papers are invited to examine social experience as well as legal formalities, while topics may vary widely from transitions in corporate entity or financial institution status (particularly in contexts of economic development or flux); shifts in intellectual property treatment; the migration process of immigrants, asylum seekers, or business entities across sovereign borders; to the criminal justice process. Papers which engage vulnerability theory as a central tool of analysis are most warmly welcomed.

Submissions Procedure:
Email a proposal of several paragraphs as a Word or PDF document by September 16, 2016 to Rachel Ezrol, rezrol@emory.edu.

Decisions will be made by September 30, 2016 and working paper drafts will be due November 23, 2016 so they can be duplicated and distributed prior to the Workshop.

Workshop Details:
The Workshop begins Friday, December 9 at 4PM at Emory University School of Law. Dinner follows Friday's session. Panels continue on Saturday, December 10 from 9 AM to 5 PM; breakfast and lunch will be provided.

For More Information: http://web.gs.emory.edu/vulnerability

Posted: August 3, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Carla Hayden Confirmed as 14th Librarian of Congress

The Senate confirmed the nomination of Dr. Carla Hayden to serve as the nation's 14th Librarian of Congress on July 13, 2016.  Dr. Hayden the first female and the first African American to lead the Library of Congress. View her confirmation testimony here.  

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Posted: July 19, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


National History Day Seeks Teachers for WWII Project

NHD is seeking 18 experienced educators for a journey to San Francisco, Honolulu, and Manila to research and develop classroom materials for WWII. The travel for this program is fully funded for the teachers, they only have to pay to get to Washington, D.C. Travel overseas, room and board, and courses are all paid for.  Deadline for applications is September 2, 2016. 

Read more here. 

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Posted: July 19, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


American Library Association and Bazan ED Seek Volunteers

ALA and Bazan ED seek historians knowledgeable about the slave trade in America to volunteer to conduct a free public lecture on the topic of Slaver, Resistance, and Abolition. This free public lecture series will take place at libraries, museums, and schools throughout the United States between August 21 and October 30, 2016, and is inspired by the new film "The Birth of a Nation," which depicts Nat Turner's rebellion.

Click here for more information or to volunteer.

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Posted: July 19, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession