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Save Princeton Coalition Update

The Daily Princetonian ran an editorial expressing support for the preservation of Maxwell's Field, a portion of the Princeton Battlefield which has recently been purchased by the Insitute for Advanced Studies. The IAS plans to develop faculty housing on the land. The National Coalition for History, of which the OAH is a member, recently took out an advertisement in the Chronicle of Higher Education, urging the IAS to preserve Maxwell's Field.

The Daily Princetonian editorial can be read in full here.

The open letter can be read here. 

Posted: April 29, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


The Future of the African-American Past

The American Historical Association and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture announce a landmark international conference to mark the opening of the museum. 

Conference Sessions:

Registration is Free of Charge.

College and University departments that fund graduate student travel to the conference can be listed as a sponsor. Learn more by contacting Dana Schaffer (dschaffer@historians.org).

For more details visit futureafampast.si.edu 

Posted: April 29, 2016
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Transnational American Studies Institute Dissertation Prize

A Dissertation Prize in the amount of € 1000 will be awarded annually for outstanding Ph.D. work in the field of transnational American studies. It is sponsored by the future Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany.

Eligible for submission are dissertations completed at either a German or a foreign university in transnational American Studies and related fields, such as Early American Studies, Indigenous Studies, Life Writing, Ecology, Transnational History, Asian American/Pacific Studies, Material and Media Studies, Religious Studies, International Politics, and Economy.

Unpublished manuscripts of dissertations, defended in the last two years, written in German or English, will be evaluated by an international panel to select the award winner.

The award ceremony takes place annually in November. At this occasion the award recipient will be asked to give a presentation on his/her work.

In order to apply for the Obama Institute Dissertation Prize, please submit:

· a cover letter
· one copy of your dissertation
· abstract of your dissertation (two pages)
· two letters of reference (e.g. the supervisors' dissertation reports)
· your CV

The deadline for submission is July 31, 2016.

Please send your application to the following address:

Institute for Transnational American Studies
Obama Dissertation Prize
Fachbereich 05 Philosophie – Philologie
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz (JGU)
Jacob-Welder-Weg 18
55128 Mainz
Germany

For More Information: http://obama-institute.com/opportunities/obama-dissertation-prize/

Posted: April 28, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


Upcoming Deadline for Submissions for Willi Paul Adams Award

Posted: April 26, 2016
Tagged: None


New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance Authors’ Awards Program

The New Jersey authors' awards were instituted in 1994 to encourage and celebrate books about New Jersey. Awards are considered for works in five, non-fiction categories:

All works nominated should provide a new understanding of New Jersey's history and culture, demonstrate evidence of original research in the application of New Jersey resources and/or reveal new insights into a topic. The work must have appeared in the previous two calendar years: 2014 or 2015. There is no in-state residency requirement for authors/editors/compilers.

All works should utilize appropriate primary resources. Although the principle criterion for an award to a scholarly or reference work is the well-written provision of information, a nominated work will also be judged upon its ability to provide full citations for the text, endnotes, footnotes, photographs, illustrations, maps and charts. A complete bibliography or list of references is also expected. Citations should adhere to standard style manuals, such as the Chicago Manual of Style, Turabian's Manual for Writers of Term Papers, the MLA Style Manual, etc.

The authors' awards will also recognize those who edit or compile primary, largely untapped, resources–or a collection of essays or articles–and make them widely available by publication in print or on the web. The published primary resource or edited work should be accompanied by commentary and/or explanatory annotations. They will also be held to the same criteria as scholarly and reference works mentioned above.

Nominations by the author/compiler or other submitters will be accepted from January 12, 2016 through May 30, 2016 by the author/compiler or other submitters. The nomination packet must include an explanatory cover letter (stating for which category the work is nominated) and the nominee's resume. These should be e-mailed to Deborah Mercer at dmercer@njstatelib.org with "NJSAA Author Award" in the subject line. In addition, five copies of the publication proposed for the award must be mailed to the NJ Authors' Awards Committee, c/o Deborah Mercer, New Jersey State Library, P.O. Box 520, 185 W. State Street, Trenton, NJ 08625. Items in electronic format may simply be sent to Deborah Mercer at the e-mail address above. All materials must be received by May 30, 2016.

The full committee reads and reviews all nominations and deliberates over the summer. If more than one work is nominated for a specific category, the committee will choose the one that most closely meets the criteria. If no nominations conform to the criteria, the committee may refrain from giving an award that year.

Winners will be selected and then reported to the New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance membership at its fall meeting. All nominees are notified prior to this meeting and announcements are made to various listservs. The awardees receive a certificate of recognition and have the opportunity to discuss their book before a statewide audience at an author panel in conjunction with one of the NJSAA meetings.

Additional information on the award (including past winners) and the Academic Alliance may be found at: http://www.njsaa.org.

Committee members include: Benjamin Beede, Laura Poll, Harriet Sepinwall, Richard Veit and Deborah Mercer, chair.

Posted: April 25, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


Fulbright US Scholar Award: Mary Ball Washington Award in American History

Commencing September 2017 and based at University College Dublin School of History, the successful candidate will conduct a combination of teaching and research, with the teaching component of the grant to be agreed upon with the Head of School. The Scholar will have the opportunity to conduct and present his/her own research, and will be expected to mentor graduate students and contribute to the school's Distinguished Lecture Series.

This Award is for U.S. citizens and open to academics only. Ph.D. (or other terminal degree) plus teaching experience at college/university level and tenure required. A letter of invitation from the host University is required.

Application Deadline: 1 August 2016

For More Information: http://catalog.cies.org/viewAward.aspx?n=7519&dc=EI

Posted: April 19, 2016
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


Long Beach Indie Film, Media and Music Conference

Long Beach Indie Film, Media, and Music Conference
www.longbeachindie.com
August 31-September 4, 2016 (Submission Deadline May 6, 2016)

The Long Beach Indie International Film, Media, and Music Festival is looking for scholars, filmmakers, archivists, musicians, directors, bloggers, and journalists to bring their intellect, art, and energy to our 2016 Film, Media, and Music Conference.

We invite individual papers and full panels representing any topic (e.g. theory, production, history, criticism, preservation, etc.) related to film, television, music, mass communication, digital media, and/or the entertainment industry broadly defined.

We are also issuing a special call for papers interrogating and/or celebrating the theme: "Gender, Race and the Entertainment Industry."

Bringing together scholars and entertainment industry professionals, the conference occurs in the middle of the five-day Long Beach Indie International Film, Media and Music Festival. (The majority of the paper presentations occur September 2-3, 2016). Official festival venues include the Cinemark at the Pike Theaters, the Long Beach Convention Center, and the Renaissance Hotel Long Beach.

Celebrating global diversity is the mission of Long Beach Indie and we would love to see that expressed in paper submissions. Come spend Labor Day Weekend in beautiful Long Beach, California.

Submission Deadline: May 6, 2016
Notification Date: May 15, 2016

Posted: April 4, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCH Marks Numerous Achievements in 2015

By Lee White

In an extremely productive 2015, the National Coalition for History achieved numerous major goals. Foremost among these was the restoration of funding for K–12 history education in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

In addition, unexpected issues allowed NCH to reinforce its role as the preeminent public voice for history, archives, and our other constituencies. For example, we submitted comments to the federal government regarding the treatment of oral history in research, as well as a letter to the secretary of state and the archivist of the United States expressing concern over the handling of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's e-mails.

We also launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components. This improved our efforts to educate our constituent organizations (and potential members) about the important contributions the coalition has made in the past and how we will continue to play a vital role in policy making in the future.

Some issues, such as making the case for federal funding for history-related programs, will always remain at the core of NCH's agenda. But the coalition is now poised to continue to expand beyond Washington, truly making it the National Coalition for History.

Below is a summary of NCH's major accomplishments in 2015:

ESSA includes four sections that provide funding streams for K–12 history and civics education. Two sections are specifically earmarked for those subjects and two sections establish grant programs in which the subjects are eligible for competitive funding.

NCH is already working to ensure that the new programs authorized in the law are funded during the fiscal year (FY) 2017 congressional appropriations process.

Fiscal Year 2016 Federal Funding for History-Related Agencies and Programs

On December 18, Congress approved a $1.15 trillion omnibus appropriations bill that will fund the federal government for the rest of FY '16. Several positive developments came from the bill. For example, the National Endowment for the Humanities budget was increased for the first time in six years, by $2 million, up to $148 million. And potentially severe cuts in the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays International Education programs were defeated.

Of particular note is the level funding received by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) this fiscal year. The original appropriations bill considered in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee would have cut NHPRC's FY '16 budget by 40 percent, from $5 million in FY '15 to $3 million. The situation allowed NCH to use the contacts gained from the Congressional History Caucus (see below), and the cut was rescinded at the House Appropriations Committee markup. NHPRC was the only program in the entire bill to have funding restored.

As we have said in the past, the fact that Congress did not go so far as to cut funding for our interests is a true victory, given today's budget climate.

NCH Submits Comments on Human Subjects Research in HHS Rule

In September, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and 15 other federal departments and agencies announced that they were considering revisions to the regulations for the protection of human subjects in research.

The proposed rule specified "oral history, journalism, biography, and historical scholarship activities that focus directly on the specific individuals about whom the information is collected" as potentially exempt from "the scope of the Common Rule" (that is, the requirement that institutional review boards approve all research involving human subjects). The recommendations also acknowledged that oral history, and historical studies in general, already employ well-­developed codes of ethical conduct. Finally, the draft rule recognized the importance and value of identifying individual historical actors in history; IRBs often require human subjects to be given anonymity.

The Oral History Association's (OHA) executive director, the late Clifford Kuhn, took the lead in preparing draft comments on the proposed rule. The comments strongly endorsed the recommendation to exclude oral history from the Common Rule. NCH used the OHA's paper as the basis for a letter submitted to the HHS on October 30 (see http://historycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/NCH-HHS-Human-Subjects-Proposed-Rule-10-30-15.pdf).

National Women's History Museum Commission

In December 2014, President Obama signed legislation establishing a commission to study the potential creation of a National Women's History Museum. In 2015, the panel's members were appointed, and they are now ramping up the commission's activities. They recently launched a website and social media presence (www.womens historycommission.org). The commission is tasked with submitting a report to the president and Congress by no later than November 18, 2016.

The commission has solicited input from leading authorities and experts on women's history, professionals from the museum and curatorial fields, prominent American women, and influential women's organizations from across the country. A "scholar's summit" was held in January. I recently met with the commission's executive director and research director and expressed NCH's interest in assisting in whatever way we can in its work.

Congressional History Caucus

Throughout 2015 NCH worked to recruit members to the Congressional History Caucus and assist it in its mission of promoting history on Capitol Hill. We currently have 23 members in the House caucus, an increase from the end of the last session.

Our website (historycoalition.org) includes a "how-to" page to allow NCH organizations and their members to recruit members of Congress to the caucus. We continued to promote the "Dear Colleague" letter urging representatives to join the caucus. Every House office was contacted at least once by an NCH staff member. NCH member organizations sent solicitations to their constituents urging them to contact their congressional representative to have them join. More information on the History Caucus can be found at historycoalition.org/congressional-history-caucus.

NCH anticipates an equally productive 2016. Stay tuned.

Lee White is executive director of the National Coalition for History.

Posted: April 4, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


National Coalition For History 2015 Annual Report

Prepared by Lee White, Executive Director, December 28, 2015

2015 was an extremely successful and productive year for the National Coalition for History which saw the achievement of numerous major accomplishments in 2015. Foremost among these was the restoration of funding for K-12 history education in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), was brought to fruition.

In addition, unexpected issues arose that allowed NCH to reinforce its role as the preeminent public voice for history, archives and our other constituencies. These included submitting comments to the federal government on the treatment of oral history in research and a letter to the Secretary of State and the Archivist of the United States expressing concern over the handling of former-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails.

NCH improved in our efforts to educate our constituent organizations (and potential members) about our important contributions in the past, and how the coalition will continue to play a vital role in policy making in the future. NCH launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components.

Issues such as making the case for federal funding for history-related programs will always remain at the core of NCH's agenda. However, in 2016 the coalition is poised to continue to transform itself beyond Washington to truly make it the "National" Coalition for History.

Below is a summary of NCH's major accomplishments in 2015:

Restoration of federal funding for K-12 history/civics education

After nearly a decade of false starts, President Obama has signed a new education law (Public Law 114-95) to replace the controversial No Child Left Behind Act; which was passed in 2001. On December 9, the US Senate voted 85–12 to approve the conference report to a bill (S. 1177) to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. On December 2, the House had approved the report by a vote of 359–64.

Most importantly for the historical community, the new law—the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—restores targeted federal funding for K–12 history and civics education. NCH and the coalition's member organizations have engaged in advocacy efforts for nearly five years to achieve this goal. Given the elimination of federal funding for over 60 programs in the bill, restoration of funding for history education is a major accomplishment.

ESSA includes four sections that provide funding streams for K–12 history and civics education. Two sections are specifically earmarked for those subjects and two sections establish grant programs in which the subjects are eligible for competitive funding.

NCH is already working to ensure the new programs authorized in the law are funded during the FY '17 congressional appropriations process.

FY '16 Federal Funding for History-Related Agencies and Programs

On December 18, Congress approved a $1.15 trillion omnibus appropriations bill that will fund the federal government for the rest of fiscal year 2016. For example, the NEH budget was increased for the first time in six years by $2 million up to a level of $148 million. Potentially severe cuts in the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays International Education programs were defeated.
Of particular note is the level funding the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) received this fiscal year. The original appropriations bill considered in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee would have cut NHPRC's FY' 16 budget by 40 percent from the FY' 15 level of $5 million to $3 million. The situation allowed NCH to use the contacts gained from the Congressional History Caucus, and the cut was rescinded at the House Appropriations Committee markup. The NHPRC was only program in the entire bill to have funding restored.

This has become a mantra in recent years, but the fact that our interests survived intact should be considered a victory in this budget climate.

NCH comments on Human Subjects Research in HHS Rule

In September, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and fifteen other federal departments and agencies announced proposed revisions to the regulations for protection of human subjects in research.

The draft rule stated that "oral history, journalism, biography, and historical scholarship activities that focus directly on the specific individuals about whom the information is collected" be explicitly excluded from "the scope of the Common Rule." Moreover, the recommendations acknowledged the importance and value within oral history, and historical studies more generally, to identify individual actors in history, and recognized that there already existed discipline-specific codes of ethical conduct.

The Oral History Association's (OHA) executive director, the late Dr. Clifford Kuhn, took the lead in preparing draft comments on the proposed rule. The comments strongly endorsed the recommendation to exclude oral history from the Common Rule. NCH used the OHA's paper as the basis for a letter submitted to the HHS on October 30. (http://historycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/NCH-HHS-Human-Subjects-Proposed-Rule-10-30-15.pdf)

National Women's History Museum Commission

In December 2014, President Obama signed legislation establishing a commission to study the potential creation of a National Women's History Museum. In 2015, the panel's members were appointed, and they are now ramping up the commission's activities. They recently launched a website and social media presence (http://www.womenshistorycommission.org). The commission is tasked with submitting a report to the president and Congress by no later than November 18, 2016.

The commission has solicited input from leading authorities and experts on women's history, professionals from the museum and curatorial fields, prominent American women, and influential women's organizations from across the country. A "scholar's summit" was held in January 2016. I recently met with the commission's executive director and research director and expressed NCH's interest in assisting in whatever way we can in its work.

Congressional History Caucus

Throughout 2015 NCH worked to recruit members and assist the Congressional History Caucus in achieving its mission of promoting history on Capitol Hill. We currently have 23 members in the House caucus, which is more than we had at the end of the last session.

Our website includes a "how-to" page to allow NCH organizations and their members to recruit Members of Congress for the caucus. We continued to promote the "Dear Colleague letter" urging representatives to join the caucus. Every House office was contacted at least once by NCH staff. NCH member organizations sent solicitations to their members urging them to contact their House member and urge them to join. More information on the History Caucus can be found at (http://historycoalition.org/congressional-history-caucus)

NCH Organizational Update

As noted above, NCH launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components. As a result, NCH was able to expand the frequency of communications with the full membership not just the policy board. Staff developed an infographic to highlight NCH's achievements to existing members, and to solicit new and lapsed organizations to join the coalition. Staff completed a "re-branding" project which included the development of a new logo for NCH for use on letterhead, the website, social media, business cards, etc. Emails recruiting new members were sent to numerous target organizations for follow-up. After the launch of the website, the interns devoted nearly all of their time on membership recruitment and retention.

Posted: April 4, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


Theme Sessions on the Gulf South in Peace and War

October 13-15, 2016

Mobile, Alabama

The Gulf South History and Humanities Conference is an annual event sponsored by the Gulf South Historical Association, a consortium of Gulf South colleges and universities from the states of Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.

Years ending in "6" have frequently marked times of transition between peace and war: 1819, 1866, 1916, and 1946 in particular. The 34th Annual Gulf South History and Humanities Conference, hosted by the University of South Alabama, welcomes all researchers and scholars to propose papers on such liminal periods, but all topics, panels, roundtables, performances, and workshops, exploring all aspects of the history, ethnography, archaeology, development, and cultures of the Gulf South and Circum-Caribbean are encouraged. 

The registration fee includes a Thursday evening reception at the Admiral Hotel, all conference sessions, and a free one-year membership in the Association. Tickets for the banquet, annual keynote address, and a courtesy cocktail reception are all included in the additional banquet fee. 

Proposals must be postmarked by the July 15, 2016 submission deadline. To submit an individual paper, send a Word document attachment containing a title, 150 word abstract and one-page vita. To submit for the theme panel, send a Word document attachment containing a title and brief (150 word) description of the theme, 150 word absract for each paper, a one-page vita for each presenter and the suggested chair/discussant. To submit for the roundtable forums or discussions, send a Word document attachment containing a title and brief (150 word) description of the topic and a complete list of the participants and moderator/discussant with one-page vitas.

All submissions should be sent via email to the program chair, Dr. Donald DeVore, at ddvore@southalabama.edu. Please put "2016 Gulf South Paper" in the email subject line. Or, send a hard copy to Dr. Donald DeVore, Department of History, 5991 USA Drive North, Room 334, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688. Expect an email confirmation once your submission has been received.

For hotel reservations, contact The Admiral Hotel at http://group.curiocollection.com/GulfSouthHistoryandHumanitiesConference or 251-432-8000 (844-442-8746 toll-free). Conference room rates are $99.00/night, single or double occupancy. Please book before 12 September 2016 to guarantee the conference rate. 

Posted: March 29, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


National History Day Graduate Courses for Teachers 2016-17

Introduction to Project-Based Learning Through the NHD Curriculum Framework 

Graduate credits offered through the University of San Diego

The following courses require either five years of NHD experience or completion of the Introduction to Project-Based Learning Course:

Developing Websites to Facilitate Historical Thinking Skills

Conducting Historical Research in the NHD Model

Developing Exhibits to Facilitate Historical Thinking Skills 

Writing and Editing for NHD

Developing Documentaries to Facilitate Historical Thinking Skills 

Developing Performances to Facilitate Historical Thinking Skills

For More Information: nhd.org/OnlineEducation

Posted: March 28, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


Symposium Announcement: "A New Materialism?" April 1-2 at the University of Michigan

"A New Materialism? Rethinking the History of Global Capitalism at the Nexus of Culture and Political Economy."

April 1-2, 2016 at the University of Michigan
An Eisenberg Institute Forum

This two-day symposium will showcase original essays from leading cultural, intellectual, urban, labor, and literary historians engaged with various forms of global capitalism. The papers stretch across two centuries and several continents: from antebellum shoe factories and disaster relief camps in the Jim Crow South to the strange career of black liberalism and the fashion runways of the 1970s. We begin with a pair of questions. What would it look like to write critical histories of capitalism unencumbered by the reductionist logics of historiographical "turns"? And how might we begin to think across the conceptual zero sums (culture vs. economy, discourse vs. material conditions, semiotics vs. big structures) that have so often circumscribed discussion in this area?

Rather than presenting the "new history of capitalism "as a turn "beyond" or "away from" previous modes of questioning, we seek to bridge and disrupt, combine and complicate.

On April 1st, there will be three panels featuring pre-circulated faculty papers, a formal comment, and intensive discussion building on previously posted online responses.

On April 2nd, there will be two final panels driven by questions and presentations from Ph.D. students and postdocs at five different institutions.

Confirmed panelists:
• Howard Brick (Michigan)
• Elspeth Brown (Toronto)
• Kathleen Brown (Penn)
• Nathan Connolly (NYU)
• Jay Cook (Michigan)
• Konstantin Dierks (Indiana)
• Geoff Eley (Michigan)
• Nan Enstad (Wisconsin)
• Alison Isenberg (Princeton)
• Susan Scott Parrish (Michigan)
• Seth Rockman (Brown)
• Andrew Zimmerman (George Washington)

For additional information and registration instructions, please see the symposium website: http://sites.lsa.umich.edu/newmaterialism/

Posted: March 24, 2016
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


John Nolen Research Fund, Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University

The John Nolen Research Fund, established through the generosity of the Nolen family, provides assistance to scholars to conduct research in the John Nolen Papers and allied collections in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of the Cornell University Library. Any qualified researcher interested in the history of city and regional planning before 1950 with a project that can be augmented by using the Nolen Papers is eligible to apply. Applications are due by April 30, 2016; awards will be made by May 31 for support to begin on July 1, 2016. For fellowship information and application requirements, please visit https://rare.library.cornell.edu/services/funding/nolen

Posted: March 24, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


Fully-funded, full-time, PhD Studentship in History, University of Worcester, UK

Applications are invited for a fully-funded, full-time, PhD studentship at the University of Worcester (UK) in History, aligned with the expertise of one or more of our History researchers. This is one of a number of research projects in competition for one PhD Studentship in History. The project which receives the best applicant will be awarded the funding.

The USA and World War II: This topic will explore social, political, intellectual and cultural aspects of the United States during World War Two and can address both home and/or war fronts but not military history. Applications considering propaganda (in any medium), psychological warfare, or race and gender are especially encouraged.

Closing date: Monday 6th June 2016

For More Info: https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=73902&LID=3056

Posted: March 24, 2016
Tagged: Miscellaneous


Celebrate the Five Year Anniversary of Community Transcription with the Papers of the War Department

Celebrate the five year anniversary of community sourced transcription with the Papers of the War Department 1784-1800 (http://wardepartmentpapers.org). An ongoing innovative documentary editing project, the Papers of the War Department is comprised of 0ver 42,000 digitized manuscript documents made freely accessible on the web by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) (http://chnm.gmu.edu/). In 2011, RRCHNM embarked on the effort to engage the larger community of citizen historians in the process of transcribing these important documents. By transcribing the digitized manuscripts, users contribute to the collection's usability and searchability. March 17, 2016 marks five years since the launch of the community transcription project Papers of the War Department and we are delighted at its success thus far.

After a devastating fire at the United States War Office in 1800, what has been considered the "national archive" of its time was thought lost. The collection was reassembled from scattered fragments found in over 200 diverse repositories before being transferred to the RRCHNM in 2006. These documents are invaluable sources of information on militia and army matters in the Early Republic. The War Department was responsible for frontier diplomacy, Indian affairs, veteran affairs as well as being a considerable commercial goods consumer.

Since inviting members of the community to assist with the transcription effort in 2011, the Papers of the War Department has amassed 2,538 registered users. These users come from varying backgrounds including genealogists, public historians, students and educators from all levels of educational institutions, and members of Native American tribes. With the help from these community transcribers, the Papers of the War Department now has over 1,500 documents transcribed, totaling 6,279 pages. Without the hard work and dedication of our community transcribers, the Papers of the War Department would not have been as successful. We are ecstatic with the contributions the project has received over these first five years and look forward to seeing its continued growth.

The Papers of the War Department was made possible through funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Since 1994, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. The Center itself is a democratic, collaborative space where over fifty scholars, technologists, and researchers work together to advance the state of the art. RRCHNM uses digital media and technology to preserve and present history online, transform scholarship across the humanities, and advance historical education and understanding. Each year RRCHNM's many project websites receive over 20 million visitors, and over a million people rely on its digital tools to teach, learn, and conduct research. Their work has been recognized with major awards and grants from the American Historical Association, National Humanities Center, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Council on Public History, U.S. Department of Education, Library of Congress, Institute of Museum and Library Services, American Council of Learned Societies, and the Mellon, Sloan, Hewlett, Rockefeller, Gould, Delmas, and Kellogg foundations.

Posted: March 24, 2016
Tagged: Miscellaneous


The Southern Quarterly

General issue. Submission deadline: September 30, 2016. The Southern Quarterly invites submissions on all topics related to Southern studies, particularly modern and contemporary Southern poetry by women, Southern architecture, the novels and films of John Grisham, and representations of the South in cyberspace. Send manuscripts as an email attachment in Word format to: SouthernQuarterly@gmail.com. Submission guidelines and the full call for papers can be found on our website: www.usm.edu/soq. The Southern Quarterly is an internationally-known scholarly journal devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Southern arts and culture, including the Caribbean and Latin America.

Posted: March 11, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Fulbright Bicentennial Chair in American Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland

OAH member Patrick B. Miller has recently been named the 2016-2017 Fulbright Bicentennial Chair in American Studies at the University of Helsinki, where he will guide courses in the Program for North American Studies/Department of World Cultures.

Posted: March 8, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession


Evers Research Scholars Program

A new program at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History will facilitate increased use of the department's holdings and the publication of original research findings. The Medgar and Myrlie Evers Research Scholars Program, a collaboration between MDAH and the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Institute supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, encourages work in the history of civil and human rights at the state archives in Jackson.

A stipend of $4,000 will be awarded to the Evers Scholar. The funds may be used to cover travel, housing, and other expenses, including costs of research.
"The intent is to allow young university faculty and upper-level graduate students to settle in and complete a substantial project," said Archives and Records Services director Julia Marks Young. "You really need several weeks to take full advantage of the world-class civil rights holdings of MDAH "

Candidates will submit a CV along with a detailed project description, sample of their work, breakdown of proposed expenses, and references. Applications must be received by March 25, 2016.
For more information, contact Brittany Henderson (601.576.6850).

For more information: http://mdah.state.ms.us/new

Posted: March 8, 2016
Tagged: Fellowships


Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition Summer Graduate Internship

The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) seeks one graduate intern to work closely with editors and other staff of the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition (CWG-K).

Through this competitive internship opportunity, a successful candidate will be responsible for researching and writing short annotation entries on named persons, places, organizations, and geographical features. This work will be completed and submitted on a weekly basis to the Project Director and Intern Supervisor for evaluation, with all annotations submitted on July 29, 2016, for final review. All research for the entries must be based in primary or secondary sources, and the intern is expected to keep a research file with notes and digital images of documents related to each entry. The intern will also have the opportunity to learn, acquire and exercise additional skills associated with documentary editing including document identification, metadata control, transcription, and XML encoding.

The overall goal of the internship is to provide a high-quality, supervised professional practicum that introduces the intern to the field of documentary editing in order to enhance their education and future employability. This internship will be filled by an American history graduate student in at least the second year of a M.A. program.

To apply, submit a narrative statement—focused on the questions below—of professional ability in the form of a cover letter, a CV, and two letters of recommendation to khs.hr@ky.gov. (No phone calls please.)

Research Experience: Describe your familiarity with research in 19th century U.S. history. Describe some projects you have undertaken. What sources have you used? Have you been published? Have you interpreted historical research in forms other than a scholarly peer-reviewed publication? How does the proposed research project differ from those you have undertaken in the past? Describe your familiarity with the strengths and weaknesses of online research databases such as Ancestry.com, Fold3.com, ProQuest, and Google Books.

Project Experience: Describe any work you have done in the editing of historical documents. Discuss how a project such as CWG-K maintains balance between thorough research and production schedules. Have you worked on other collaborative projects in the field of history or otherwise? Describe your ability to meet deadlines and regulate workflow. Describe your understanding of and/or experience with the "Digital Humanities." From what you understand of the CWG-K project, how does it fit with current trends in the field? What do you hope to gain from working on the CWG-K project?

This paid internship will consist of 250 hours over the course of 10 weeks—starting on June 1, 2016.

This is a temporary position—with a $2,500 stipend—based in Frankfort, Ky. Employee benefits are not available. Housing is not provided.

Application deadline is March 31, 2016. Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D.

The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) is a state agency and membership organization that is fully accredited by the American Association of Museums. We educate and engage the public through Kentucky's history in order to confront the challenges of the future.

For More Information

Posted: February 29, 2016
Tagged: Internships


U.S. History Scene

U.S. History Scene, a multimedia history education project founded by Harvard historians, is currently seeking undergraduate and graduate applicants for its Summer 2016 Historical Writing and Research Internship Program. Interns will gain valuable writing and publishing skills through the process of writing, submitting, and editing original multimedia research articles, book reviews, and classroom lesson plans.

All interns will work one-on-one with our Editorial Board to gain experience in primary source research, editing, and publishing. Internships are unpaid, but we will assist interns in applying for stipends or university credit. Internships can be performed via telecommute from your home university.

To apply: Interested undergraduates and graduate students should submit a resume/ CV, unofficial transcript, and a writing sample to Executive Editor Jennifer Ostwinkle at Editors@USHistoryScene.com by April 1, 2016. Applicants are asked to submit a list of five original topics they would be interested in working on; these topics are not binding, but help us understand applicants' research interests. Applicants will be notified of their application decision by April 22, 2016.
For more information, please contact Jennifer at Editors@USHistoryScene.com. Please feel free to forward our e-mail to your department list serve or interested students.

Posted: February 26, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession