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Advocacy news and important action alerts.

Action Alert--Oppose Budget Cuts to Vital History Programs

On May 23, President Trump sent his proposed fiscal year (FY) 2018 budget request to Congress. As expected, it included devastating cuts to federal history and humanities funding including elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and Title VI/Fulbright-Hays international education programs at the U.S. Department of Education.

House Appropriations Committee subcommittees will be drafting their spending bills between now and the end of June. It is critical that you contact your members of Congress in support of these vital federal programs. 

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Posted: June 16, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession, Advocacy


From the OAH Executive Director Regarding NEH and President Trump’s FY18 Budget

As many of you already know, the humanities received two pieces of bad news this week. William "Bro" Adams, the chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, resigned on Monday, and President Donald Trump's FY18 budget was released with major cuts to and elimination of many programs. As Lee White, executive director of the National Coalition for History (NCH), notes, Congress controls appropriations, Trump's budget has already met with criticism on both sides of the aisle, and the process of passing a budget is lengthy and goes through a number of subcommittees.

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy


Three National Monuments Under Review

Three Pacific Northwest National Monuments have been selected by the Department of the Interior for review--Hanford Reach (Washington), Cascade-Siskiyou (Oregon), and Craters of the Moon (Idaho). Public comment periods opened on May 12. For more information about the sites under review, please click here. Online comments can be submitted here.

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Posted: May 31, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy


Advocacy Alert - IRB Exception for Oral History

On January 19 the federal government issued its final rule governing Institutional Review Boards (IRB) which "explicitly removes" oral history and journalism from the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects. The historical community, collaborating through the National Coalition for History, has long argued that scholarly history projects should not be subject to standard IRB procedures since they are designed for the research practices of the sciences.

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Posted: February 16, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession, Advocacy


Oppose Cuts to Federal Funding for International Education

House and Senate Appropriations Committees are in the process of finalizing fiscal year 2017 (FY17) Department of Education funding bills. Unfortunately, severe cuts to Title VI/Fulbright-Hays international education programs are on the table.

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Posted: June 17, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


Urge the Senate to Confirm Dr. Carla Hayden as Librarian of Congress

President Obama's nomination of Dr. Carla Hayden to become the 14th Librarian of Congress is pending before the U.S. Senate and may be voted on at any time. We are asking you to contact your senators and urge them to support her confirmation and that a vote be scheduled as soon as possible so she can assume her position, which has been vacant since October 2015. Dr. Hayden would become the first woman and the first African-American to lead the Library of Congress. Please contact your U.S. Senators in support of Dr. Hayden's nomination today!

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Posted: June 17, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


Save Princeton Coalition Update

The Daily Princetonian ran an editorial expressing support for the preservation of Maxwell's Field, a portion of the Princeton Battlefield which has recently been purchased by the Insitute for Advanced Studies. The IAS plans to develop faculty housing on the land. The National Coalition for History, of which the OAH is a member, recently took out an advertisement in the Chronicle of Higher Education, urging the IAS to preserve Maxwell's Field.

The Daily Princetonian editorial can be read in full here.

The open letter can be read here. 

Posted: April 29, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


NCH Marks Numerous Achievements in 2015

By Lee White

In an extremely productive 2015, the National Coalition for History achieved numerous major goals. Foremost among these was the restoration of funding for K–12 history education in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

In addition, unexpected issues allowed NCH to reinforce its role as the preeminent public voice for history, archives, and our other constituencies. For example, we submitted comments to the federal government regarding the treatment of oral history in research, as well as a letter to the secretary of state and the archivist of the United States expressing concern over the handling of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's e-mails.

We also launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components. This improved our efforts to educate our constituent organizations (and potential members) about the important contributions the coalition has made in the past and how we will continue to play a vital role in policy making in the future.

Some issues, such as making the case for federal funding for history-related programs, will always remain at the core of NCH's agenda. But the coalition is now poised to continue to expand beyond Washington, truly making it the National Coalition for History.

Below is a summary of NCH's major accomplishments in 2015:

ESSA includes four sections that provide funding streams for K–12 history and civics education. Two sections are specifically earmarked for those subjects and two sections establish grant programs in which the subjects are eligible for competitive funding.

NCH is already working to ensure that the new programs authorized in the law are funded during the fiscal year (FY) 2017 congressional appropriations process.

Fiscal Year 2016 Federal Funding for History-Related Agencies and Programs

On December 18, Congress approved a $1.15 trillion omnibus appropriations bill that will fund the federal government for the rest of FY '16. Several positive developments came from the bill. For example, the National Endowment for the Humanities budget was increased for the first time in six years, by $2 million, up to $148 million. And potentially severe cuts in the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays International Education programs were defeated.

Of particular note is the level funding received by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) this fiscal year. The original appropriations bill considered in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee would have cut NHPRC's FY '16 budget by 40 percent, from $5 million in FY '15 to $3 million. The situation allowed NCH to use the contacts gained from the Congressional History Caucus (see below), and the cut was rescinded at the House Appropriations Committee markup. NHPRC was the only program in the entire bill to have funding restored.

As we have said in the past, the fact that Congress did not go so far as to cut funding for our interests is a true victory, given today's budget climate.

NCH Submits Comments on Human Subjects Research in HHS Rule

In September, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and 15 other federal departments and agencies announced that they were considering revisions to the regulations for the protection of human subjects in research.

The proposed rule specified "oral history, journalism, biography, and historical scholarship activities that focus directly on the specific individuals about whom the information is collected" as potentially exempt from "the scope of the Common Rule" (that is, the requirement that institutional review boards approve all research involving human subjects). The recommendations also acknowledged that oral history, and historical studies in general, already employ well-­developed codes of ethical conduct. Finally, the draft rule recognized the importance and value of identifying individual historical actors in history; IRBs often require human subjects to be given anonymity.

The Oral History Association's (OHA) executive director, the late Clifford Kuhn, took the lead in preparing draft comments on the proposed rule. The comments strongly endorsed the recommendation to exclude oral history from the Common Rule. NCH used the OHA's paper as the basis for a letter submitted to the HHS on October 30 (see http://historycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/NCH-HHS-Human-Subjects-Proposed-Rule-10-30-15.pdf).

National Women's History Museum Commission

In December 2014, President Obama signed legislation establishing a commission to study the potential creation of a National Women's History Museum. In 2015, the panel's members were appointed, and they are now ramping up the commission's activities. They recently launched a website and social media presence (www.womens historycommission.org). The commission is tasked with submitting a report to the president and Congress by no later than November 18, 2016.

The commission has solicited input from leading authorities and experts on women's history, professionals from the museum and curatorial fields, prominent American women, and influential women's organizations from across the country. A "scholar's summit" was held in January. I recently met with the commission's executive director and research director and expressed NCH's interest in assisting in whatever way we can in its work.

Congressional History Caucus

Throughout 2015 NCH worked to recruit members to the Congressional History Caucus and assist it in its mission of promoting history on Capitol Hill. We currently have 23 members in the House caucus, an increase from the end of the last session.

Our website (historycoalition.org) includes a "how-to" page to allow NCH organizations and their members to recruit members of Congress to the caucus. We continued to promote the "Dear Colleague" letter urging representatives to join the caucus. Every House office was contacted at least once by an NCH staff member. NCH member organizations sent solicitations to their constituents urging them to contact their congressional representative to have them join. More information on the History Caucus can be found at historycoalition.org/congressional-history-caucus.

NCH anticipates an equally productive 2016. Stay tuned.

Lee White is executive director of the National Coalition for History.

Posted: April 4, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


National Coalition For History 2015 Annual Report

Prepared by Lee White, Executive Director, December 28, 2015

2015 was an extremely successful and productive year for the National Coalition for History which saw the achievement of numerous major accomplishments in 2015. Foremost among these was the restoration of funding for K-12 history education in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), was brought to fruition.

In addition, unexpected issues arose that allowed NCH to reinforce its role as the preeminent public voice for history, archives and our other constituencies. These included submitting comments to the federal government on the treatment of oral history in research and a letter to the Secretary of State and the Archivist of the United States expressing concern over the handling of former-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails.

NCH improved in our efforts to educate our constituent organizations (and potential members) about our important contributions in the past, and how the coalition will continue to play a vital role in policy making in the future. NCH launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components.

Issues such as making the case for federal funding for history-related programs will always remain at the core of NCH's agenda. However, in 2016 the coalition is poised to continue to transform itself beyond Washington to truly make it the "National" Coalition for History.

Below is a summary of NCH's major accomplishments in 2015:

Restoration of federal funding for K-12 history/civics education

After nearly a decade of false starts, President Obama has signed a new education law (Public Law 114-95) to replace the controversial No Child Left Behind Act; which was passed in 2001. On December 9, the US Senate voted 85–12 to approve the conference report to a bill (S. 1177) to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. On December 2, the House had approved the report by a vote of 359–64.

Most importantly for the historical community, the new law—the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—restores targeted federal funding for K–12 history and civics education. NCH and the coalition's member organizations have engaged in advocacy efforts for nearly five years to achieve this goal. Given the elimination of federal funding for over 60 programs in the bill, restoration of funding for history education is a major accomplishment.

ESSA includes four sections that provide funding streams for K–12 history and civics education. Two sections are specifically earmarked for those subjects and two sections establish grant programs in which the subjects are eligible for competitive funding.

NCH is already working to ensure the new programs authorized in the law are funded during the FY '17 congressional appropriations process.

FY '16 Federal Funding for History-Related Agencies and Programs

On December 18, Congress approved a $1.15 trillion omnibus appropriations bill that will fund the federal government for the rest of fiscal year 2016. For example, the NEH budget was increased for the first time in six years by $2 million up to a level of $148 million. Potentially severe cuts in the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays International Education programs were defeated.
Of particular note is the level funding the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) received this fiscal year. The original appropriations bill considered in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee would have cut NHPRC's FY' 16 budget by 40 percent from the FY' 15 level of $5 million to $3 million. The situation allowed NCH to use the contacts gained from the Congressional History Caucus, and the cut was rescinded at the House Appropriations Committee markup. The NHPRC was only program in the entire bill to have funding restored.

This has become a mantra in recent years, but the fact that our interests survived intact should be considered a victory in this budget climate.

NCH comments on Human Subjects Research in HHS Rule

In September, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and fifteen other federal departments and agencies announced proposed revisions to the regulations for protection of human subjects in research.

The draft rule stated that "oral history, journalism, biography, and historical scholarship activities that focus directly on the specific individuals about whom the information is collected" be explicitly excluded from "the scope of the Common Rule." Moreover, the recommendations acknowledged the importance and value within oral history, and historical studies more generally, to identify individual actors in history, and recognized that there already existed discipline-specific codes of ethical conduct.

The Oral History Association's (OHA) executive director, the late Dr. Clifford Kuhn, took the lead in preparing draft comments on the proposed rule. The comments strongly endorsed the recommendation to exclude oral history from the Common Rule. NCH used the OHA's paper as the basis for a letter submitted to the HHS on October 30. (http://historycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/NCH-HHS-Human-Subjects-Proposed-Rule-10-30-15.pdf)

National Women's History Museum Commission

In December 2014, President Obama signed legislation establishing a commission to study the potential creation of a National Women's History Museum. In 2015, the panel's members were appointed, and they are now ramping up the commission's activities. They recently launched a website and social media presence (http://www.womenshistorycommission.org). The commission is tasked with submitting a report to the president and Congress by no later than November 18, 2016.

The commission has solicited input from leading authorities and experts on women's history, professionals from the museum and curatorial fields, prominent American women, and influential women's organizations from across the country. A "scholar's summit" was held in January 2016. I recently met with the commission's executive director and research director and expressed NCH's interest in assisting in whatever way we can in its work.

Congressional History Caucus

Throughout 2015 NCH worked to recruit members and assist the Congressional History Caucus in achieving its mission of promoting history on Capitol Hill. We currently have 23 members in the House caucus, which is more than we had at the end of the last session.

Our website includes a "how-to" page to allow NCH organizations and their members to recruit Members of Congress for the caucus. We continued to promote the "Dear Colleague letter" urging representatives to join the caucus. Every House office was contacted at least once by NCH staff. NCH member organizations sent solicitations to their members urging them to contact their House member and urge them to join. More information on the History Caucus can be found at (http://historycoalition.org/congressional-history-caucus)

NCH Organizational Update

As noted above, NCH launched a newly redesigned website in April 2015 with enhanced social media components. As a result, NCH was able to expand the frequency of communications with the full membership not just the policy board. Staff developed an infographic to highlight NCH's achievements to existing members, and to solicit new and lapsed organizations to join the coalition. Staff completed a "re-branding" project which included the development of a new logo for NCH for use on letterhead, the website, social media, business cards, etc. Emails recruiting new members were sent to numerous target organizations for follow-up. After the launch of the website, the interns devoted nearly all of their time on membership recruitment and retention.

Posted: April 4, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


Federal Funding for History Holds Steady

On December 18, 2015, Congress approved a $1.15 trillion omnibus appropriations bill that will fund the federal government for the rest of fiscal year 2016. The vote in the House was 316–113; in the Senate, it was 65–33. President Obama signed the bill into law (PL 114-113) the same day.

Across the board, our programs generally were either level-funded or received small increases this fiscal year compared to last. 

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Posted: February 26, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Profession


Urge the House to Fund K-12 History and Civics Education

In December, President Obama signed into law a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The "Every Student Succeeds Act" restored funding for K-12 history and civics education that was eliminated five years ago. Unfortunately, when the President's budget request was released on February 9 it did not include appropriations for the major new program source of funding for history and civics.

Left unfunded was a competitive grant program for non-profit organizations to develop and disseminate innovative approaches to provide high quality instruction in American history and civics for under-served students.

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Posted: February 18, 2016
Tagged: News of the Profession, Advocacy


Congress Restores Funding for K–12 History Education

By Lee White

After nearly a decade of false starts, President Obama has signed a new education law (Public Law 114-95) to replace the controversial No Child Left Behind Act that was passed in 2001. On December 9, the U.S. Senate voted 85–12 to approve the conference report to a bill (S. 1177) to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. On December 2, the House approved the report by a vote of 359–64.

Most importantly for the historical community, the new law—the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—restores targeted federal funding for K–12 history and civics education. The National Coalition for History (NCH), the OAH, and the coalition's member organizations have engaged in advocacy efforts for nearly five years to achieve this goal. Given the retrenchment of federal funding for a host of programs in the bill, restoration of funding for history education is a major accomplishment.

In fiscal year (FY) 2012, Congress terminated funding for the Teaching American History (TAH) grants program at the Department of Education. The move also eliminated appropriations earmarked for civics education and federal funding for National History Day, a nationally recognized program that increases student participation in historical studies across the country. As a result, starting in FY 2012 there has been no federal funding provided for history or civics education.

ESSA includes four sections that provide funding streams for K–12 history and civics education. Two sections are specifically earmarked for those subjects, and two sections establish grant programs in which the subjects are eligible for competitive funding.

Within ESSA, Subpart 3: American History and Civics Education authorizes an allocation of 1.4 percent of the amount appropriated for all national activities relating to preparing, training, and recruiting high-quality teachers, principals, and other school leaders for each fiscal year the act is in effect (FY 2017 through FY 2020). It is important to note that these amounts will still need to be funded through the annual appropriations process. The maximum allowable allocations are $6,564,000 each for FY 2017 and FY 2018, $6,568,000 for FY 2019, and $6,848,000 for FY 2020. (These funding amounts are provided by the Committee for Education Funding.)

Two programs stand to benefit substantially from Subpart 3. Presidential and Congressional Academies for American History and Civics (section 2232) would receive not less than 26 percent of the amount available, and other National Activities (section 2233) would receive up to 74 percent.

Section 2232: Presidential and Congressional Academies for American History and Civics—This section establishes intensive academies for teachers and students to learn more about history and civics. The secretary of education shall award up to 12 grants annually on a competitive basis to fund the academies.

1. Presidential Academy—Each year, the Presidential Academy shall select between 50 and 300 teachers of American history and civics from public or private elementary schools and secondary schools to attend a seminar or institute that provides intensive professional development opportunities. The program will be led by a team of primary scholars and core teachers who are accomplished in the field of American history and civics. It will be conducted during the summer or other appropriate time and will be between two and six weeks in duration. Teachers will receive a stipend to attend the seminar or institute.

2. Congressional Academy—Each year the Congressional Academy shall select between 100 and 300 outstanding students of American history and civics to attend a seminar or institute. To be eligible to attend, a student must be recommended by his or her secondary school principal or other school leader. The student must be a secondary school junior or senior in the academic year following attendance at the seminar or institute. The program will be conducted during the summer or other appropriate time and will be between two and six weeks in duration. Students will receive a stipend to attend the seminar or institute.

Entities eligible to conduct the Presidential and Congressional Academies include institutions of higher education, nonprofit educational organizations, museums, libraries, and research centers with demonstrated expertise in historical methodology or the teaching of American history and civics. Eligible entities must provide matching funds equal to 100 percent of the amount of the grant.

Section 2233: National Activities—The purpose of this section is to promote new and existing evidence-based strategies to encourage innovative instruction in American history, civics and government, and geography; learning strategies; and professional development activities and programs for teachers, principals, and other school leaders. The grants emphasize instruction, strategies, activities, and programs that benefit low-income students and underserved populations.

ESSA authorizes the secretary of education to award competitive grants to eligible entities (such as institutions of higher education and nonprofit or for-profit organizations) with demonstrated expertise in the development, implementation, and strengthening of programs to teach traditional American history, civics, economics, and geography. Grants will be awarded for developing, implementing, and disseminating for voluntary use innovative, evidence-based approaches to American history and civic learning that demonstrate innovation, scalability, and accountability. Grants may be for professional development. Grants are for a three-year period with the opportunity for a one-time two-year renewal.

There are two other potential funding streams for history and civics. The law provides funding to the states to make grants to local education agencies (LEAs) for a broad range of programs.

Section 4107: Well-Rounded Educational Opportunities—This section provides competitive funding to local education agencies (LEAs) to develop and implement programs that provide students with a "well-rounded education." One allowable use of grant funds is for "activities to promote the development, implementation, and strengthening of programs to teach traditional American history, civics, economics, geography, or government education." LEAs may partner with other LEAs, institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, community-based organizations, and businesses in developing these programs.

Section 4611: Education Innovation and Research—This section creates a new research and innovation fund that allows LEAs, in conjunction with nonprofit organizations, to apply for funding to create, implement, replicate, or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve student achievement and attainment for high-need students. Innovations in teaching civics, history, and social studies are eligible for grants. This could be the source of much-needed funding for the evaluation of programs.

So what happens next?

First, the programs authorized in the law have to be funded by the appropriations committees in the House and Senate. The NCH will be sending alerts in February, when the FY 2017 appropriations process begins, asking everyone who cares about history, civics, and social studies to contact their senators and representatives to urge full funding for these programs created as part of the ESSA legislation. Despite the fact that the grant programs now exist, we still must push to have them fully funded.

Second, over the course of 2016, the Department of Education will prepare program guidelines and competitive criteria for the grant programs outlined in ESSA. That way, once the funding is made available, the department will be ready to issue calls for proposals.

Finally, the competitive funding awards will likely be made, and moneys distributed, for the first time in the second half of calendar year 2017. The change in administrations in January may push the timetable further back.

The restitution of federal funding for K–12 history and civics education is reason to cheer, and we should recognize the important role that advocacy played in ensuring that K–12 history continues to play an important role in our children's education.

Lee White is executive director of the National Coalition for History.

Posted: January 12, 2016
Tagged: Advocacy


Urge the Senate to Pass the "Every Student Succeeds Act"

On December 2, the House of Representatives by a vote of 359-64 approved the conference report to S.1177, the "Every Student Succeeds Act." The bill reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for the next four years and replaces the No Child Left Behind Act. Most importantly the legislation includes multiple sources of funding to support improved instruction in K-12 history, civics, geography and economics.

The Organization of American Historians, along with the National Coalition for History (NCH), urgently needs you to contact your U.S. Senators and urge them to support the conference report. Click here for a link that allows you to send an email directly to your Senators and urge him or her to support the conference report that includes key provisions that benefit history and civics education.

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Posted: December 3, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession, Advocacy


Urge Congress to Support K-12 History Education Today

On December 2, the House of Representatives is scheduled to consider the conference report to S. 1177, the "Every Student Succeeds Act." The bill reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for the next four years and replaces the much maligned No Child Left Behind Act. Most importantly the legislation includes multiple sources of funding to support improved instruction in K-12 history, civics, geography and economics.

The Organization of American Historians (OAH) urgently needs you to contact your Member of the House of Representatives and urge him or her to support the conference report that includes key provisions that benefit history and civics education. Click here for a link that allows you to send an email directly to your Member of the House of Representatives and urge him or her to support the conference report that includes key provisions that benefit history and civics education.

The House is voting first on S. 1177, the "Every Student Succeeds Act." While the Senate is likely to pass the bill, as you know in recent months the House has gone through a chaotic fight over its leadership. Even though the bill cleared the House-Senate conference committee by an overwhelming bi-partisan majority of 38-1, its passage by the House is by no means a foregone conclusion. Politics unrelated to the underlying merits of the bill may still derail it. So it is vital that all representatives, Republicans and Democrats, receive the message from their constituents that the education of our nation's K-12 students is vitally important and a non-partisan issue.

OAH limits our legislative "action alerts" to situations and issues that are vital to the interests of our constituents. We cannot overstress the importance of this effort! Congress has not reauthorized the ESEA in 15 years so this legislation is our only opportunity to get funding restored for K-12 history and civics education.

The bill is expected to go to the House floor on December 2. Time is of the essence so call or email today!

How to Contact Your Representative

Please call or email your House member's office and urge them to support restoring federal funding for history and civics education. To contact your representative, you can use one of these two options. No matter which means of communication you choose, please personalize your message as to your background or interest in history. If you are employed in the field, especially as a K-12 teacher, mention the institution where you work in your congressional district.

  1. Make a phone call. All Members of Congress can be reached through the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202)224-3121. If you feel comfortable doing so, a personal phone call is preferable to an email.If you are not sure who your Representative is you can follow this link to the House's website and enter your zip code which will provide a link to your House member's website: http://www.house.gov/
  2. Send an email. The National Coalition of History (of which the OAH is a member) is working with the National Humanities Alliance which has prepared a one-step link to your House member (click here). You simply enter your address and the system identifies your representative. We've provided an email template that can be edited to personalize your message. The message not only goes to your House member's email, but their Twitter account and Facebook page as well.

Posted: November 30, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Profession


Action Alert: National Humanities Alliance

Act now to prevent deep cuts to funding for international education.

The Senate has proposed deep cuts to Title VI and Fulbright-Hays.

These programs are crucial for educating U.S. students for our interconnected world and training experts in foreign languages and cultures.

The proposed cut would slash $25 million (35%) from Title VI and Fulbright-Hays, and it has already passed out of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

This comes after a drastic cut in 2010 and would amount to a 63% reduction over five years!

What's at stake?

Click here for more information on Title VI programs and the status of the appropriations process.

Send a message to Congress now.
We need to speak out now to ensure that the Senate bill does not advance any further. The House appropriations committee has already approved funding at the current level. Your voice will help ensure that these crucial international education programs remain intact.

For more information about the National Humanities Alliance, click here.

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Posted: August 26, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Advocacy


Action Alert: Urge Congress to Restore Funding for K-12 History and Civics Education

Negotiations to finalize a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) will resume when Congress returns after Labor Day. Quite simply, the Senate bill restores federal funding for K-12 history and civics education while the House bill does not. 

The Organization of American Historians and the National Coalition for History (NCH) urgently need you to contact your member of the House of Representatives. Congressmen Ross (R-FL) and Cicilline (D-RI) have drafted and distributed a sign-on letter urging their colleagues to adopt the history and civics provisions in the Senate's version of the bill.

Please urge your representative to sign the "Dear Colleague" letter supporting key provisions that benefit history and civics education.

Send an email directly to House members!

Follow this link to NCH's website for more information.

To read the full Action Alert, click here.

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Posted: August 21, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Organization, News of the Profession


OAH LGBTQ Committee Issues Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell v. Hodges

The Organization of American (OAH) Historians Committee on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Historians and Histories celebrates the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges, declaring same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states and making marriage equality a reality.

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Posted: June 29, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Organization, News of the Profession


U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Same-Sex Marriage

In a historic civil rights ruling issued today in Obergefell v. Hodges, the U.S. Supreme Court made marriage a right available to all Americans, regardless of sexual orientation. The OAH Executive Board submitted an amicus curiae brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in support of the petitioners written by historian and OAH member George Chauncey on the history of discrimination against gay men and lesbians in America. This brief was cited specifically by Justice Anthony Kennedy in his majority opinion in today's decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, as was the historical scholarship of OAH president-elect Nancy Cott and other prominent American historians.

Read the OAH LGBTQ Committee statement here.

Read the U.S. Supreme Court decision here.

Read the amicus curiae brief here.

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Posted: June 26, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Advocacy


National Coalition of History Updates

Ask your Representative to join the Congressional History Caucus. The caucus aims to provide a forum for members of Congress to share their interest in history and to promote an awareness of the subject on Capitol Hill.

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Posted: June 8, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy


OAH Members Respond to the Redskins Name Debate

During the business meeting at the 2015 OAH Annual Meeting, members voted to pass the following resolution asking the Washington Redskins to change their name. 

The Organization of American Historians hereby adds its voice to the growing demands by Native American organizations, our sister disciplines, and conscientious people of all ethnic backgrounds, to change the name and logo of the Washington "Redskins."

In a subsequent meeting, the OAH Executive Board voted to let the resolution stand as passed by the membership.

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Posted: June 6, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy