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Calls for Papers

We welcome your call for proposals or papers for upcoming meetings, conferences, or writing projects within the field of US history. Please submit your announcement using this form.

Call for Papers Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution September 21-23, 2019

Call for Papers
Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution
September 21-23, 2019


Fort Ticonderoga seeks proposals for the Sixteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution to be held Friday-Sunday, September 20-22, 2019. 

The 250th anniversary of the American War of Independence looms on the horizon, but the anniversary of the political, social, and military events of the broader American Revolution are already upon us. Reflecting on the antecedents to the War itself may help scholars and historians to frame new approaches and contextualize the period better in the coming years.

The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks proposals for new research on this critical period of the 18th century from a variety of perspectives and participants. Established scholars, graduate students, and others are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers broadly addressing the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the War for American Independence. We are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international nature of the conflict, representing the variety of peoples and places involved. 

We welcome interdisciplinary backgrounds and approaches covering the period from the 1760s to the 1780s. Papers may include or engage:

• Material Culture
• Biographical Analysis
• Social and Cultural Histories
• Global Theatres of War 
• Archaeological Studies
• Indigenous Perspectives

Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with partial travel reimbursement. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by September 1, 2018, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

For more information click here

Posted: June 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: Living Well: Histories of Emotions, Wellness, & Human Flourishing

Living Well: Histories of Emotions, Wellness, & Human Flourishing, A special issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences

Organized by the Forum for History of Human Science in honor of historian John C. Burnham (1929-2017), this special issue will bring together historical studies that analyze how the social and behavioral sciences have attended to the meanings and conditions of living well and human flourishing. We are interested in accounts that consider what these sciences, as well as popular works that draw on them, have said about living well, in its spiritual, psychological, cultural, social, economic, and/or political dimensions.

Submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Read more about this opportunity here.

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Posted: June 1, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCPH Call for Proposals

NCPH invites proposals for its 2019 conference in Hartford, Connecticut, that explore how public history intersects—sometimes purposefully, sometimes with unintended consequences—with the ongoing task of making and remaking places, communities, and polities. To learn more about the conference theme, “Repair Work,” and to fill out the proposal form, visit us at http://bit.ly/ncph2019CFP. Final submissions are due Sunday, July 15, 2018 at 11:59 pm. Please email NCPH Program Manager Meghan Hillman at meghillm@iupui.edu with any questions.

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Posted: June 1, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Call for Papers: WEB DuBois and Liberal Education

The Villanova Center for Liberal Education (VCLE) at Villanova University is sponsoring a one-day conference on W.E.B. DuBois and Liberal Education. We have chosen to celebrate the work of DuBois because he is the exemplary interdisciplinary, engaged scholar, not merely a practitioner of the liberal arts but also an ardent defender of them. His writings encompassed and bridged philosophy, sociology, literature, political science, history, music, economics, Africana Studies, and cultural studies. He was also a journalist, editor, organizer, and political activist. 2018 is the 150th anniversary of his birth.

Read more about this call for papers here.

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Posted: June 1, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Call for Proposals: U.S. Catholic Historian--Suburban Catholicism

U.S. Catholic Historian seeks submissions for a future issue on the topic of Suburban Catholicism.

Read more here about this call for submissions.

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Posted: May 31, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: U.S. Catholic Historian--Immigration after 1880

U.S. Catholic Historian seeks submissions for a future issue on the topic of the New Immigrants: Catholic Arrivals after 1880.

Read here for more information about this call for submissions.

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Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project

The James K. Polk Project and the Department of History at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, invite paper proposals for "James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project," to be held at the East Tennessee Historical Society, in Knoxville, on April 12–13, 2019.

Read here for more information about this event.

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Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Call for Proposals - Midwestern History Association

Call for Proposals: Fourth Annual Midwestern History Conference
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Proposal Submission Deadline: Friday, January 12, 2018 (non-negotiable)

The Midwestern History Association and the Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University invite proposals for papers to be delivered at the Fourth Annual Midwestern History Conference, to be held on June 6, 2018 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Proposals should be sent to Scott St. Louis of Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center at stlouis1@gvsu.edu.

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Posted: December 22, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call For Proposals - 2019 OAH Annual Meeting

2019 OAH Annual Meeting | Philadelphia

CALL FOR PROPOSALS ARE NOW OPEN--CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT
Submissions will be accepted between November 27, 2017 and January 12, 2018

Call for Proposals

"The Work of Freedom"

NEW: Use the OAH Annual Meeting Crossroads  to find collaborators or contribute to a proposal for the 2019 OAH Annual Meeting!

From the historical profession's beginnings in the late 19th and early 20th century, freedom has been a dominant theme in research, writing, and public debates on the shape, content, and character of the American experience. Over a century of scholarship and popular discussions have illuminated topics such as the diverse struggles for freedom, the denial of freedom, the limits of freedom, the prospects of freedom, the sources of freedom, the obligations of freedom, the value of freedom, the geographies of freedom, and the meaning of freedom, to name several. Marking the 400th Anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in British North America, the theme of this program shifts the lens to the "Work of Freedom." It aims to capture the labor(s) involved in identifying and securing freedom, from the colonial era and founding of the Republic through the recent election of Donald J. Trump President of the United States.

The program committee encourages proposals focusing on research, teaching, and public education that address our theme as creatively and as broadly as possible. Our theme opens up opportunities for scholars working across a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in colonial North American and U.S. history. We are interested in proposals that probe the theme within the traditional fields of economic, political, diplomatic, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women's/gender history as well as southern, Appalachian, and western history; and the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LBGT, and queer history; environmental and public history; carceral state studies; and transnational and global studies across all fields, topics, and thematic emphases.

Moreover, we hope to take advantage of our meeting in Philadelphia, an iconic setting for struggles and debates over the question of freedom, to encourage proposals that explore the interplay of freedom's work on behalf of African Americans, the poor, workers, and other disfranchised and structurally marginalized groups since people from Africa embarked upon their journey in Jamestown four centuries ago. The committee also welcomes panels, workshops, and roundtables that employ new methodologies, particularly digital humanities technology, that transcend traditional disciplinary and geographic boundaries. Finally, the 2019 Program Committee will reinforce the OAH's ongoing commitment to diversity and inclusion along myriad lines of difference and historic inequality, including ethnic/racial, gender/sexuality, and institutional affiliation, research/teaching, among others.

 


PROPOSAL SUBMITTER RESPONSIBILITIES: Upon review of the submissions, the 2019 Program Committee will only announce a "pending acceptance" or a "rejection." If you receive a pending acceptance it is the proposal submitter's responsibility to ensure that each session participant, regardless of role, completes their speaker agreement within the requested deadline (typically July 1). Once all agreements have been completed, only then will the session be officially accepted. If the agreements are not received by the deadline, the pending acceptance is void.

The proposal submitter is also asked to inform the OAH at the close of the Annual Meeting if any session participants failed to appear without prior notification.

Please ensure each participant reads important notes prior to submission.

 


2019 OAH Annual Meeting Program Committee


Like Program Committees past, we encourage sessions in a variety of formats—traditional panels composed of three papers and a comment, but also sessions of a single paper of unusual significance with several commentators, round tables of several brief papers that explore a significant issue or assess the state of a field, workshops, and sessions devoted to teaching. A descriptive list of session formats is found below.

All sessions will be 90 minutes in length, with the exception of workshops, which may run longer.

Twenty-five minutes should be reserved for discussion.

If the proposed session takes the traditional form of a series of papers with a comment, proposers should take into account the 90-minute slot, with 25 minutes reserved for discussion, when developing the proposal.

Session Types

Please remember that all sessions except workshops are 90 minutes in length and that 25 minutes should be reserved for discussion.

Paper Session: The traditional session format, paper sessions feature a chair, three or four papers, and one or two commentators. A single paper can have one or more presenters.

Panel Discussion: Panel discussions include a group of people discussing one topic, such as a film, a new text, or a tribute to a well-known scholar. Each panelist speaks on a distinct topic relating to the session theme. These sessions include a chair, three to five panelists, and no commentator.

Roundtable Discussion: Roundtable discussions include a group of experts discussing a topic. A moderator leads the discussion, but all participants speak equally about the topic, with no distinct topic assigned to each participant. These sessions include a chair, three to five participants, and no commentator.

State of the Field: In these panels senior historians and new professionals discuss a subfield of American history in depth. These panels have one chair, two or three panelists, and no commentator. These sessions will be recorded.
 

Workshop: A workshop is a training session where the presenters work directly with participants to teach them a new skill or concept. Workshops are usually small, so the group can participate in the learning and interact with the presenters.Please indicate the length needed for the workshop. These sessions often have one or two presenters.

Debate: A debate is a regulated discussion of an issue with two matched sides. Debates have one moderator, two or more panelists, and no commentators.

Single Paper: Single paper proposals include a paper that the presenter would like the program committee to join with other single paper proposals or small sessions. The committee can only place single papers if other papers pair well to create a complete session. We encourage you to utilize the OAH Online Member Directory  or use the NEW: OAH Crossroads to connect with other historians in your field to construct a full proposal for consideration. 

Chat Seminar: 45-minute seminars that encourage discussion, debate, and conversation about topics trending in the field of American history. Each chat is led by 1-2 moderators who are not content providers, but instead direct and guide the conversation. Chats take place over the lunch period on the Saturday of the conference only. Chats include one or two moderators, and no commentators, panelists, or presenters.

Film Screening: Film screenings usually show all or a portion of a film and include a question-and-answer segment with the filmmaker and producers. Film screenings have a chair and one or more panelists.

Advance Text Session: Substantial papers are offered online three weeks prior to the convention to be discussed in detail during the meeting. These sessions include a chair, the paper author who will make introductory comments for 5 minutes only, and one or more commentators, with a minimum of 45 minutes reserved for audience discussion.

Posted: December 20, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


New Approaches to Gender and Migration in the U.S. since 1900, A Graduate Symposium

The History Department at Bates College invited papers on the topic of gender and migration to and/or within the United States since 1900. Presentations will be part of a day-long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recent PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups. (African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.) Of special interest is work that considers gender and sexuality intersectionally with other markers of social difference; or that employs a transnational or translocal framework; or that raises the historic visibility of women migrants.

Read more >

Posted: December 15, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


Women and Religion in the Early Americas

For a special issue in honor of the life and career of Mary Maples Dunn, Early American Studies seeks article-length contributions from scholars working on the history of women and religion in the early Americas. Mary Maples Dunn (1931-2017) was a leading practitioner of women’s history, as a scholar, as a teacher, and in her life as a university leader. She worked in a variety of fields from early American women’s history; to colonial Latin American history; to the history of religious women; to the history of women’s education as well as, of course, the worlds of William Penn and early Philadelphia. 

The editors invite essays that consider the history of early American women, early American religion (or both) and are especially interested in work that makes cross-cultural comparisons or integrates multiple Atlantic orientations: North and South (French, British, Dutch, Spanish and/or Portuguese) East and West (from European and/or African links to Native American perspectives). We are interested in both formal article-length contributions (10,000 words) and in shorter essays on "Notes and Documents" that highlight innovative or creative ways of reading/using primary-source documents (3,000-5,000 words). 

To submit, please email a 3-page CV and a 1,000 word summary of the contribution you propose to write by September 30 to Ann Little (ann.little@colostate.edu) and Nicole Eustace (nicole.eustace@nyu.edu). Please use the subject line "Mary Maples Dunn Special Issue Submission." We will notify you of your preliminary acceptance by October 31, 2017 and final essays are due on April 30, 2018. Articles are to be published, subject to peer review, in 2019.

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The Poetics and Politics of ‘Anonymous’ Contemporary Craft

Is anonymity in conditions of artisanal production counterintuitive to our understanding of contemporary craft? The great majority of recent exhibitions and publications about modern and contemporary craft cite artistry that has a known provenance, mainly comprised of identified individual authors. Is the monographic study of individual genius, a convention established by Vasari in the Renaissance, still helpful or a hindrance, and does that model serve the meanings of pottery, weaving, or cast metals, where workshops of dozens (or hundreds) are the longer historical tradition? If one of the strengths of craft history has been an expansive view beyond the traditional art historical canon and an inclusion of women’s work and indigenous making, a recurring weakness has been its paternalistic attitudes towards marginalized and underrepresented cultures. For instance, a craft museum recently exhibited 20th-century metalwork as “anonymous African jewelry,” a shorthan d that normatizes three problematic terms in one fell swoop. This session seeks papers on anonymous artisans which go beyond the insider/outsider duality and which strive for taxonomies with more nuance than ‘folk,’ and especially welcomes field work that strays into complex manufacturing or collective production as well as case studies that “look at what the practitioners do” (Geertz, 1973).

For More Information: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


International Conference on the Blues

4th Annual International Conference on the Blues 
Deadline: July 10, 2017
Conference dates: October 1-3, 2017
www.deltastate.edu/blues
Delta State University, Cleveland, Mississippi

Delta State University is now accepting proposals for papers, presentations, lecture-performances, workshops, panels, and clinics for the 4th annual International Conference on the Blues. 

To celebrate the centennial of John Lee Hooker's birth, we are soliciting manuscripts and presentations on Mr. Hooker's music, life, and influence. In addition, we are interested in presentations and papers on the legacy of ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax, and especially his fieldwork in Mississippi.

Furthermore, topics of general interest to scholars and enthusiasts are also welcome, such as the African American musical tradition and its influence on world music; call and response as metaphor; black music and the American Civil Rights Movement; African American history in the Delta; African American folk life; and the genres of blues, jazz, gospel, and soul music. Topics of an interdisciplinary nature are also encouraged. Papers are invited from ethnomusicologists, musicologists, scholars, authors, performers, blues enthusiasts, and independent researchers.

Additionally, to support young and emerging scholars (graduate students, recent masters and doctoral graduates, and junior faculty), the Luther Brown Prize is awarded to the outstanding young scholar paper.

All presentations will be a maximum of 20 minutes in length, with an additional ten minutes for discussion, and should address a general audience. Proposals must be submitted online via www.deltastate.edu/blues. Please include a description of the presentation, audio/visual equipment needs, and biographical information for all presenters. Please note that not all A/V requests will be granted. Presenters agree to appear at the conference at their own expense, which will include registration fees. 

The conference falls in between the Mighty Mississippi Music Festival in Greenville, Mississippi and the King Biscuit Blues Festival in Helena, Arkansas.

For more information, please contact Shelley Collins and Don Allan Mitchell at blues at deltastate.edu.

For More Information: http://www.internationaldeltabluesproject.com/conference/

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 Lucerne Master Class for PhD Students

HISTORIES OF GLOBAL CAPITALISM" - with Prof. Dr. Sven Beckert (Harvard University)

APPLICATION DEADLINE
15th June 2017

THE SCHOLAR
Sven Beckert is Laird Bell Professor of History in the Department of History as well as co-chair of the Program on the Study of Capitalism at Harvard University. His main focus lies on the history of the United States in the nineteenth Century, with a particular emphasis on the history of capitalism, including its economic, social, political and transnational dimensions. The combined examination of these dimensions is also at the heart of the monograph he is best known for: Empire of Cotton: A Global History (2014). Other pertinent publications include Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development (2016), and The American Bourgeoisie: Distinction and Identity in the Nineteenth Century (2010).

THE TOPIC
During the past few years, few topics have animated the chattering classes more than capitalism. In the wake of the global economic crisis, questions about the nature, past and viability of capitalism suddenly appeared on evening talk shows and in newspapers throughout the world, crossing most political boundaries. Partly in response to the contemporary debates, historians, ever attuned to the world in which they live, have rediscovered the study of the history of capitalism. In their work, they have insisted on the long-term trajectory of capitalism, have emphasized the great variety of capitalism both over time and in space, have focused on capitalism’s global connections, and, perhaps most insistently, have emphasized the political, social and cultural embeddedness of economic change. Their work has created a powerful challenge to some of the naturalizing tenets that are frequently found in the discipline of economics.

In this Lucerne Master Class we will explore some of these discussions, and try to come to terms with what this new history of capitalism is all about. Students’ own work will be crucial to our discussions, as are prominent texts from within what has become one of the most dynamic fields in modern historical research.

PARTICIPANTS
The Master Class addresses doctoral students from disciplines such as History, Philosophy, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Political Science, Social Anthropology, Economics and Global Studies. Applications from international and EU doctoral students as well as doctoral students from Switzerland are welcome.

COSTS
Tuition fee: 350 CHF

The organizing body of the Master Class, the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences (GSL) at the University of Lucerne, will cover catering and accommodation expenses. We will try to cover travel expenses as well, however, this depends on the country of origin. For details please send an email to the us (contact Email at the end of the page). If applicants can muster support from their respective home institution, this is welcome.

APPLICATION
Please provide a short statement of motivation (no more than one page), a CV and a short description (no more than one page) of your current dissertation project. Postdocs may be admitted on the basis of individual decision.

WHAT FORMER PARTICIPANTS SAY
“The Lucerne Master Class is a unique experience for PhD students. It has helped me a lot both in terms of motivation and content of my dissertation. I would definitely do it again.” (Daniel Bader, Heidelberg University)

“The Master Class was a one-time opportunity to discuss the work of an outstanding scholar and to get to know other PhD students working on related issues.” (Sebastian Möller, University of Bremen)

“I believe that spending this week with the Master will have an impact on the rest of my academic career.” (Sandra Engelbrecht, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin)
Programm

The class will begin on the 9th of October at 1.00 pm and end on the 13th of October at 1.00 pm.
The daily schedule will be from 9.00 am - 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm - 6.00 pm and on one evening (lecture & dinner) from 6.00 - 9.00 pm. There will be an afternoon for recreation in the Lucerne area. Participants will discuss Sven Beckert’s recent work but also present and discuss their own projects.

CONTACT
christina.cavedon@unilu.ch

For More Information: http://www.unilu.ch/masterclass

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Legal Transitions and the Vulnerable Subject: Fostering Resilience through Law’s Dynamis

There is a widespread perception that we live in a moment of change that is unprecedented in its scope and pace. Climate change, mass movements of dislocated persons, technological innovation, shifts in recognition of sexual and gender diversity, and new information networks challenge identities, institutions, and political coalitions. The law plays a critical role in creating and responding to change. A significant dimension of individuals’ and groups’ experience of change involves transformation in legal regulation. Relationships previously outside the law may gain recognition; the social insurance of risk may shift dramatically; entire legal status categories may disappear. As the law transforms, individuals and groups also transition across legal boundaries.

Vulnerability theory provides a framework for understanding how individuals and groups experience change, as they transition across legal categories. Vulnerability theory seeks to shift our understanding of law’s paradigmatic subject, from a static and autonomous one to a dynamic and socially embedded subject. The legal subject is not a universal adult but rather an evolving being who traverses across the life course from childhood to agedness, experiencing periods of heightened biological and derivative dependency along the way. Furthermore, both individuals and multiple social groupings are constantly susceptible to change in their ecological, economic, social, and political environments. Social institutions, including law, may form to promote human resilience—the capacity to adapt to change.

The purpose of this workshop will be to investigate how individuals’ and groups’ transitions between legal status categories expose vulnerability and also offer opportunities for fostering resilience. While legal scholarship often examines static legal categories, explaining how and why these categories privilege and advantage various individuals and groups, the movement of individuals and groups across legal categories itself deserves analysis. These transitions across legal categories—for example, from contracting strangers to corporate partners, non-married to married couples, employee to manager, insured to uninsured, incarcerated to released, or undocumented to documented—involve transformations in individual identity, relational dynamics, social networks, and institutional forms. The way in which law facilitates transitions itself will affect individuals’ and groups’ experience of legal change, as injurious or empowering, fair or unjust.

We invite papers that consider three main themes centered in the relationship between legal transition, vulnerability, and resilience. First, papers might consider how the movement between legal status categories transforms both individual and group identities and relationships. How does the process of change, itself, variously expose vulnerability and generate resilience? Second, papers may consider how legal categories and institutions change when law requires them to open their boundaries to individuals who do not conform to traditional norms. In this manner, the movement across legal status categories not only changes those in the process of transition but also fosters dynamism in institutions. Third, papers might examine how transitions in individuals’ and groups’ legal statuses reveal challenges and opportunities for achieving the just distribution of social, economic, and other benefits and advantages. How should law allocate the costs and benefits generated by the movement across legal status categories? 

We intend the workshop to cover a variety of topics ranging from corporate to family to healthcare to criminal law, among other arenas, and encourage the participation of scholars working in related historical, sociological, economic and other fields. 

Issues for discussion may include:

• How does the transition between legal status categories affect people, families, communities, and entities across a range of socio-legal axes? 
• What differences in transitions between legal status categories inhere depending on who is transitioning—individuals, entire communities, or corporate entities? 
• How are these differences informed by what is being sought or avoided? 
• What happens to existing legal categories in processes of legal transition? 
• How do those who undergo legal transitions change the institutions and categories they inhabit?
• What dynamism exists within legal frameworks as these legal transitions occur? 
• How does this dynamism, in turn, affect legal transition processes? 
• To what needs does the process of legal transition give rise, and how are these needs affected by socioeconomic factors?
• How might we allocate responsibility for costs and burdens of legal transition?
• How are status positions constructed and inhabited outside law and what opportunities and risks do these statuses entail? 
• How does the process of becoming a subject of law discipline social forms, and how do individuals and groups reorganize their social relationships as their legal statuses shift?
• What impacts do the processes of legal transition on the relationships that people, communities, and entities have with one another, other social groups, and the state?
• How do legal transition experiences differ depending on how transitions arise—whether they are seen as voluntary or coerced? Isolated, or numerous and repeated? 
• How we might understand the process of legal transition itself as a dynamic response to human and institutional vulnerability?
• How does the law respond to individuals and groups engaged in the process of transitioning between legal forms?
• How does legal regulation of the legal transition process variously reproduce, entrench, or construct vulnerability and resilience?
• What shared questions of theory and methodology can ground interdisciplinary approaches to legal transitions?
• Are there alternative metaphors to legal transition that may better capture the questions of risk, protection, autonomy, dependency, and equality that arise from the movement across boundaries of legal forms?

Workshop Contacts:
Deborah Dinner, deborah.dinner@emory.edu 

Suzanne Kim, skim@kinoy.rutgers.edu 

Martha Albertson Fineman, mlfinem@emory.edu 

Submission Procedure:
Email a proposal of several paragraphs as a Word or PDF document by July 21, 2017 to Rachel Ezrol, rezrol@emory.edu

Decisions will be made by August 4, 2017 and working paper drafts will be due November 15, 2017 so they can be duplicated and distributed prior to the Workshop. 
Workshop Details:

The Workshop begins Friday at 4PM in Gambrell 575 at Emory Law School. A dinner will follow the panel presentation session on Friday. Panel presentations continue on Saturday from 9:00 AM to 5PM; breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Southern Quarterly Call for Papers: Foodway in the South

Submission deadline: December 1, 2017.

The Southern Quarterly invites submissions for a special issue on foodways in the South examining how food and drink (and the culture, literature, and practices surrounding them) express the character of the South. Materials may address this topic in any time period from the 16th to 21st centuries. Submit manuscripts online at www.usm.edu/soq, where guidelines and the full call for papers can also be found.

The Southern Quarterly is an internationally-known scholarly journal devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Southern arts and culture, including the Caribbean and Latin America.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Capitalist Transitions, Empire Building, and American History

Over the last decade there has been a resurgence of discussion about the concept of capitalism ranging from Occupy Wall Street's critiques of the uncontrolled recklessness of American finance capital to a burst of writings on the history of slavery and capitalism, and beyond. Yet there continues to be much confusion over what capitalism is in general, how to define it, and its role in American history. On a broader level this raises a series of questions going back to Marx and Weber, among others, over the transition to (or transitions to) capitalism and the uniqueness of capitalism as opposed to other historical social forms.

The purpose of this special issue is to explore this problematic through the lens of the history of American capitalist development and empire building. American capitalism developed in and through the history of the expansion of empire, destruction and displacement of native populations, remaking of ecological systems, construction of a social hierarchy organized along racial and gendered lines, making of class and state relations, and so on. It particular, it hopes to bring together scholars who are working on the edges of the boundaries of various popular or dominant paradigms and moving towards new ways of conceptualizing these issues and experimenting with perhaps more potentially risky but rewarding methodologies. In this context, authors are asked to address some aspects of the following questions in their papers:

● What exactly is capitalism, and what sort of methodological processes might we use to explain its concrete history? What might be problems with influential contemporary approaches to the question of capitalism's history over the last several decades?

● Did the United States go through its own historically specific 'transition' to capitalism? How did this occur? What were the forces behind it?

● Works on the history of American expansion and empire building are often separate from writings by, for example, social historians who have addressed the question of capitalism and labor. Given this, how, or how not, did processes of capitalist development, empire building, and labor formation operate together?

● Capitalism is also a form of social order organized along racial and gendered/patriarchal lines, and the rise of capitalism entailed a new relationship between humanity and ecology. How can our conceptions of capitalism and narratives of its history include these factors not as secondary or peripheral but central to the history of capitalist transition and development?

● The history of capitalism's rise and social normalization also was a history of resistance to capitalism. Thus how did these forces play out historically, and how did capital overcome resistance to its hegemony?

In addition to full papers of 7,000-8,000 words, sorter more specific pieces or review essays may also be considered. Authors must follow the Journal of Historical Sociology author guidelines: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-6443/homepage/ForAuthors.html.

For any inquiries (including discussing potential paper topics before writing a formal proposal) and to propose a paper please send an approximately 300 word abstract to special issue editor James Parisot at Jpariso1@binghamton.edu. The deadline for proposals is October 1st, 2017. Final papers will be due in September of 2018.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCPH 2018 Annual Meeting Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals – "Power Lines"
NCPH Annual Meeting – Las Vegas, Nevada, April 18-21, 2018

The call for proposals is open through July 15 at http://ncph.org/conference/2018-annual-meeting/
Access the full CFP at http://bit.ly/ncph2018CFP

Public historians want our work to matter. We use our skills at uncovering, sharing, facilitating, and collaborating to advance a vision of a rich, variegated collective past that contributes to shared interests in the present. For decade, "community" has been our catchphrase and our aspiration. How does our field's longstanding embrace of the collective stand up in a time of divineness? Do our commitments to individual agency, group identity, social justice, and civic engagement reinforce or strain against each other?
In drawing lines between past and present, delineating distinctive communities, and underlining the contributions of overlooked actors, how can public history bring us together and when does it pull us apart?

NCPH invites proposals for its 2018 conference that address the power of public history to define, cross, and blur boundary lines—work that explores public history's power in all its complexities, idealism, and, perhaps, unintended consequences.

Proposals are due by 11:59 PM local time on July 15, 2017.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


More than the Madeleine: Food in Memory and Ima

Claude Levi-Strauss posited that food has to be "good to think" before it is "good to eat." That contemplative moment of judgement compels us both to remember and to imagine, making the two processes an integral part of eating. Memory tells us what is safe (or not!) to eat, provides us with our culinary traditions, and is the source of our cravings. Imagination helps us to determine what to do when confronted with new substances that we have yet to classify as edible, desirable, nutritious, or delicious. Without imagination and adaptation our foodways would be predictable, boring, and static. While memory has to do with past experiences, the abiding, the familiar, and one's own cultural groups, imagination is about the future, the possible, the alien, the little known, and the other. Yet this culinary dichotomy is not so clear-cut: new foods are often made palatable by using familiar ingredients and techniques, as with sushi rolls filled with corned beef or cream cheese, for example. And not only are our memories imperfect, but they cannot account for change, whether newly developed preferences or foods that do not match up to our sensuously rich memories of them. Other foods, meanwhile, are forgotten or fail to stimulate the imagination.

This edited volume interrogates the process of our engagement with food through memory and imagination, be it in anticipation or remembrance of a meal. We wish to include work from a wide variety of disciplines that spans the globe and touches upon different periods in human history.

Potential themes may include:

Cultural constructions of collective food memories, nostalgic dishes, or imagined cuisines as tied to religion, nation, or class.
The use of memory or imagination in food advertising, literature, or art
The use of memory or imagination by chefs, on menus, or in kitchen/restaurant designs
Food scientists' approach to recreating flavors, inventing new tastes, etc.
Phenomenological perspectives on taste, the senses, and memory or imagination
Ways in which memory is disrupted, fragmented, or reimagined
Forgetting foods and culinary traditions
The reinterpretation / reimagination that occurs as foods circulate through time and space
Processes (historical, social, biophysical) whereby foods become edible / inedible, palatable / disgusting

We have interest from a well-respected publisher who has asked for a full proposal.

Please send 250-300 word abstract and 150 word bio to Dr. Beth Forrest and Dr. Greg de St. Maurice by July 15, 2017. Full manuscripts for accepted papers will be due in early spring 2018.

gregdestmaurice@gmail.com
beth.m.forrest@gmail.com

Dr. Greg de St. Maurice
Postdoctoral Fellow
Culinaria Research Center, University of Toronto
Air Liquide Research Fellow, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

Dr. Beth Forrest
Professor of Liberal Arts and Food Studies
Culinary Institute of America

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


American Journalism Historians Association

The American Journalism Historians Association invites paper entries, panel proposals, and abstracts of research in progress on any facet of media history for its 36th annual convention to be held October 12-14, 2017, in Little Rock, Arkansas. More information on the 2017 AJHA convention is available at ajhaonline.org.

The deadline for all submissions is June 1, 2017.

The AJHA views journalism history broadly, embracing print, broadcasting, advertising, public relations, and other forms of mass communication that have been inextricably intertwined with the human past. Because the AJHA requires presentation of original material, research papers and panels submitted to the convention should not have been submitted to or accepted by another convention or publication.

RESEARCH PAPERS

Authors may submit only one research paper. They also may submit one Research in Progress abstract but only on a significantly different topic. Research entries must be no longer than 25 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, not including notes. The Chicago Manual of Style is recommended but not required.

Papers must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please send the following:

Send papers to ajhapapers@gmail.com.

Authors of accepted papers must register for the convention and attend in order to present their research.

Accepted papers are eligible for several awards, including the following:
David Sloan Award for the outstanding faculty research paper ($250 prize).
Robert Lance Award for outstanding student research paper ($100 prize).
Jean Palmegiano Award for outstanding international/transnational journalism history research paper ($150 prize)
J. William Snorgrass Award for outstanding minority-journalism research paper.
Maurine Beasley Award for outstanding women's-history research paper.
Wally Eberhard Award for outstanding research in media and war.

Research Chair Michael Fuhlhage (michael.fuhlhage@wayne.edu) of Wayne State University is coordinating paper submissions. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their papers have been accepted.

PANELS

Preference will be given to proposals that involve the audience and panelists in meaningful discussion or debate on original topics relevant to journalism history. Preference also will be given to panels that present diverse perspectives on their topics. Entries must be no longer than three pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with one-inch margins. Panel participants must register for and attend the convention.

Panel proposals must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please include the following:

Send proposals to ajhapanels@gmail.com.

No individual may be on more than one panel. Panel organizers must make sure panelists have not agreed to serve on multiple panels. Panel organizers also must secure commitment from panelists to participate before submitting the proposal. Moderators are discussion facilitators and may not serve as panelists. Failure to adhere to the guidelines will lead to rejection of the proposal.

Panelists may submit a research paper and/or research in progress abstract.

Tracy Lucht (tlucht@iastate.edu) of Iowa State University is coordinating the panel competition. Authors of panel proposals will be notified in mid-July whether their panels have been accepted.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

The Research in Progress category is for work that will NOT be completed before the conference. Participants will give an overview of their research purpose and progress, not a paper presentation, as the category's purpose is to allow for discussion and feedback on work in progress. RIP authors may also submit a research paper on a significantly different topic.

For research in progress submissions, send a blind abstract of your study. Include the proposal title in the abstract. The abstract should include a clear purpose statement as well as a brief description of your primary sources. Abstracts must be no longer than two pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with 1-inch margins, excluding notes.

Primary sources should be described in detail in another double-spaced page.

Entries that do not follow these guidelines will be rejected.

The AJHA Research in Progress competition is administered electronically.

Send research in progress proposals to ajharip@gmail.com. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their proposals have been accepted.

Authors whose work is accepted must register for and attend the convention.

Melita Garza (melita.garza@tcu.edu) of Texas Christian University is coordinating the Research in Progress competition.

For More Information: https://ajha.wildapricot.org/2017call

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers