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Calls for Papers

We welcome your call for proposals or papers for upcoming meetings, conferences, or writing projects within the field of US history. Please submit your announcement using this form.

Southern Quarterly Call for Papers: Foodway in the South

Submission deadline: December 1, 2017.

The Southern Quarterly invites submissions for a special issue on foodways in the South examining how food and drink (and the culture, literature, and practices surrounding them) express the character of the South. Materials may address this topic in any time period from the 16th to 21st centuries. Submit manuscripts online at www.usm.edu/soq, where guidelines and the full call for papers can also be found.

The Southern Quarterly is an internationally-known scholarly journal devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Southern arts and culture, including the Caribbean and Latin America.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Capitalist Transitions, Empire Building, and American History

Over the last decade there has been a resurgence of discussion about the concept of capitalism ranging from Occupy Wall Street's critiques of the uncontrolled recklessness of American finance capital to a burst of writings on the history of slavery and capitalism, and beyond. Yet there continues to be much confusion over what capitalism is in general, how to define it, and its role in American history. On a broader level this raises a series of questions going back to Marx and Weber, among others, over the transition to (or transitions to) capitalism and the uniqueness of capitalism as opposed to other historical social forms.

The purpose of this special issue is to explore this problematic through the lens of the history of American capitalist development and empire building. American capitalism developed in and through the history of the expansion of empire, destruction and displacement of native populations, remaking of ecological systems, construction of a social hierarchy organized along racial and gendered lines, making of class and state relations, and so on. It particular, it hopes to bring together scholars who are working on the edges of the boundaries of various popular or dominant paradigms and moving towards new ways of conceptualizing these issues and experimenting with perhaps more potentially risky but rewarding methodologies. In this context, authors are asked to address some aspects of the following questions in their papers:

● What exactly is capitalism, and what sort of methodological processes might we use to explain its concrete history? What might be problems with influential contemporary approaches to the question of capitalism's history over the last several decades?

● Did the United States go through its own historically specific 'transition' to capitalism? How did this occur? What were the forces behind it?

● Works on the history of American expansion and empire building are often separate from writings by, for example, social historians who have addressed the question of capitalism and labor. Given this, how, or how not, did processes of capitalist development, empire building, and labor formation operate together?

● Capitalism is also a form of social order organized along racial and gendered/patriarchal lines, and the rise of capitalism entailed a new relationship between humanity and ecology. How can our conceptions of capitalism and narratives of its history include these factors not as secondary or peripheral but central to the history of capitalist transition and development?

● The history of capitalism's rise and social normalization also was a history of resistance to capitalism. Thus how did these forces play out historically, and how did capital overcome resistance to its hegemony?

In addition to full papers of 7,000-8,000 words, sorter more specific pieces or review essays may also be considered. Authors must follow the Journal of Historical Sociology author guidelines: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-6443/homepage/ForAuthors.html.

For any inquiries (including discussing potential paper topics before writing a formal proposal) and to propose a paper please send an approximately 300 word abstract to special issue editor James Parisot at Jpariso1@binghamton.edu. The deadline for proposals is October 1st, 2017. Final papers will be due in September of 2018.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCPH 2018 Annual Meeting Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals – "Power Lines"
NCPH Annual Meeting – Las Vegas, Nevada, April 18-21, 2018

The call for proposals is open through July 15 at http://ncph.org/conference/2018-annual-meeting/
Access the full CFP at http://bit.ly/ncph2018CFP

Public historians want our work to matter. We use our skills at uncovering, sharing, facilitating, and collaborating to advance a vision of a rich, variegated collective past that contributes to shared interests in the present. For decade, "community" has been our catchphrase and our aspiration. How does our field's longstanding embrace of the collective stand up in a time of divineness? Do our commitments to individual agency, group identity, social justice, and civic engagement reinforce or strain against each other?
In drawing lines between past and present, delineating distinctive communities, and underlining the contributions of overlooked actors, how can public history bring us together and when does it pull us apart?

NCPH invites proposals for its 2018 conference that address the power of public history to define, cross, and blur boundary lines—work that explores public history's power in all its complexities, idealism, and, perhaps, unintended consequences.

Proposals are due by 11:59 PM local time on July 15, 2017.

Posted: May 23, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


More than the Madeleine: Food in Memory and Ima

Claude Levi-Strauss posited that food has to be "good to think" before it is "good to eat." That contemplative moment of judgement compels us both to remember and to imagine, making the two processes an integral part of eating. Memory tells us what is safe (or not!) to eat, provides us with our culinary traditions, and is the source of our cravings. Imagination helps us to determine what to do when confronted with new substances that we have yet to classify as edible, desirable, nutritious, or delicious. Without imagination and adaptation our foodways would be predictable, boring, and static. While memory has to do with past experiences, the abiding, the familiar, and one's own cultural groups, imagination is about the future, the possible, the alien, the little known, and the other. Yet this culinary dichotomy is not so clear-cut: new foods are often made palatable by using familiar ingredients and techniques, as with sushi rolls filled with corned beef or cream cheese, for example. And not only are our memories imperfect, but they cannot account for change, whether newly developed preferences or foods that do not match up to our sensuously rich memories of them. Other foods, meanwhile, are forgotten or fail to stimulate the imagination.

This edited volume interrogates the process of our engagement with food through memory and imagination, be it in anticipation or remembrance of a meal. We wish to include work from a wide variety of disciplines that spans the globe and touches upon different periods in human history.

Potential themes may include:

Cultural constructions of collective food memories, nostalgic dishes, or imagined cuisines as tied to religion, nation, or class.
The use of memory or imagination in food advertising, literature, or art
The use of memory or imagination by chefs, on menus, or in kitchen/restaurant designs
Food scientists' approach to recreating flavors, inventing new tastes, etc.
Phenomenological perspectives on taste, the senses, and memory or imagination
Ways in which memory is disrupted, fragmented, or reimagined
Forgetting foods and culinary traditions
The reinterpretation / reimagination that occurs as foods circulate through time and space
Processes (historical, social, biophysical) whereby foods become edible / inedible, palatable / disgusting

We have interest from a well-respected publisher who has asked for a full proposal.

Please send 250-300 word abstract and 150 word bio to Dr. Beth Forrest and Dr. Greg de St. Maurice by July 15, 2017. Full manuscripts for accepted papers will be due in early spring 2018.

gregdestmaurice@gmail.com
beth.m.forrest@gmail.com

Dr. Greg de St. Maurice
Postdoctoral Fellow
Culinaria Research Center, University of Toronto
Air Liquide Research Fellow, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

Dr. Beth Forrest
Professor of Liberal Arts and Food Studies
Culinary Institute of America

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


American Journalism Historians Association

The American Journalism Historians Association invites paper entries, panel proposals, and abstracts of research in progress on any facet of media history for its 36th annual convention to be held October 12-14, 2017, in Little Rock, Arkansas. More information on the 2017 AJHA convention is available at ajhaonline.org.

The deadline for all submissions is June 1, 2017.

The AJHA views journalism history broadly, embracing print, broadcasting, advertising, public relations, and other forms of mass communication that have been inextricably intertwined with the human past. Because the AJHA requires presentation of original material, research papers and panels submitted to the convention should not have been submitted to or accepted by another convention or publication.

RESEARCH PAPERS

Authors may submit only one research paper. They also may submit one Research in Progress abstract but only on a significantly different topic. Research entries must be no longer than 25 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, not including notes. The Chicago Manual of Style is recommended but not required.

Papers must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please send the following:

Send papers to ajhapapers@gmail.com.

Authors of accepted papers must register for the convention and attend in order to present their research.

Accepted papers are eligible for several awards, including the following:
David Sloan Award for the outstanding faculty research paper ($250 prize).
Robert Lance Award for outstanding student research paper ($100 prize).
Jean Palmegiano Award for outstanding international/transnational journalism history research paper ($150 prize)
J. William Snorgrass Award for outstanding minority-journalism research paper.
Maurine Beasley Award for outstanding women's-history research paper.
Wally Eberhard Award for outstanding research in media and war.

Research Chair Michael Fuhlhage (michael.fuhlhage@wayne.edu) of Wayne State University is coordinating paper submissions. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their papers have been accepted.

PANELS

Preference will be given to proposals that involve the audience and panelists in meaningful discussion or debate on original topics relevant to journalism history. Preference also will be given to panels that present diverse perspectives on their topics. Entries must be no longer than three pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with one-inch margins. Panel participants must register for and attend the convention.

Panel proposals must be submitted electronically as PDF or Word attachments. Please include the following:

Send proposals to ajhapanels@gmail.com.

No individual may be on more than one panel. Panel organizers must make sure panelists have not agreed to serve on multiple panels. Panel organizers also must secure commitment from panelists to participate before submitting the proposal. Moderators are discussion facilitators and may not serve as panelists. Failure to adhere to the guidelines will lead to rejection of the proposal.

Panelists may submit a research paper and/or research in progress abstract.

Tracy Lucht (tlucht@iastate.edu) of Iowa State University is coordinating the panel competition. Authors of panel proposals will be notified in mid-July whether their panels have been accepted.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

The Research in Progress category is for work that will NOT be completed before the conference. Participants will give an overview of their research purpose and progress, not a paper presentation, as the category's purpose is to allow for discussion and feedback on work in progress. RIP authors may also submit a research paper on a significantly different topic.

For research in progress submissions, send a blind abstract of your study. Include the proposal title in the abstract. The abstract should include a clear purpose statement as well as a brief description of your primary sources. Abstracts must be no longer than two pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with 1-inch margins, excluding notes.

Primary sources should be described in detail in another double-spaced page.

Entries that do not follow these guidelines will be rejected.

The AJHA Research in Progress competition is administered electronically.

Send research in progress proposals to ajharip@gmail.com. Authors will be notified in mid-July whether their proposals have been accepted.

Authors whose work is accepted must register for and attend the convention.

Melita Garza (melita.garza@tcu.edu) of Texas Christian University is coordinating the Research in Progress competition.

For More Information: https://ajha.wildapricot.org/2017call

Posted: April 27, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Historians Tell Their Stories: Family and Nation during the F.D.R. Years

In today's United States, the conflict between conservatives and progressives, traditionalists and modernists, dominates politics and regularly paralyzes the governing process. This divide can be traced back to various times in American history. During the periods comprising the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration (the Great Depression, New Deal, and to a lesser degree World War II) it was resurgent. Even today, a split remains between members of families for whom Roosevelt personified the devil and those for whom he was a true hero, for whom Eleanor Roosevelt was a traitor to conservative visions of womanhood and those for whom she was an independent and strong individual who served as role model for young professional women.

Seen through the dual prism that historians can bring to family history and national history, aspects of the Roosevelt presidency provide spaces in which the meaning of American conservativism and progressivism (with both small "p" and capital "P") can be explored. What light can historians shed on some of the origins of this rift through the telling of their family histories during the Roosevelt years? Where are the intersections between the professional work of historians and their memories of family life, or of stories handed down of family life, during the Roosevelt period?

One inspiration for this project comes from Roy Rosenzweig and David Thelen's 1998 The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life. Rosenzweig and Thelen uncovered what they called the American "popular historical consciousness at its most obvious source – the perspectives of a cross section of Americans." (5) In exploring attitudes towards professional history, they pointed out that Americans they interviewed "placed national events within their familial stories or made national personages into familiar figures in personal narrative.... Popular historical narratives veered off in different directions from the textbook narratives of linear progress associated with capital "H" history. Americans engaged larger pasts on their own terms." (116)

As professional historians are themselves members of the larger American public whose memories and attitudes Rosenzweig and Thelen investigated, this book will explore the connections historians create between past and present, family history, and the nation's history. How do professional historians tell family stories? What surprises does the telling reveal? How has their disciplinary perspective been affected by their family history? My hope is that historians will use their knowledge of history to broaden and place into context their family stories. This would illuminate both sides of the historical narrative, both national and familial. It would allow professional writers and teachers of history to share their personal pasts. It would also demonstrate that in spite of Rosenzweig and Thelen's finding that the general public has little taste or even use for professional history, perhaps historians do know how to tell a good story after all.

Proposals of no more than 300 words should be sent to Marie Bolton (Associate Professor of American History, University Clermont Auvergne/CHEC, France) at marie.bolton@uca.fr along with a brief cv by July 1, 2017.

Posted: April 25, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Gone with the Wind

Submission deadline: November 15, 2017. The Southern Quarterly invites submissions exploring this iconic film, including responses to the film from reviewers and famous writers in non-English speaking countries; the film and World War II; the ways the film has been reinterpreted in other media; recasting gender/racial roles; etc. Submit manuscripts online at www.usm.edu/soq, where guidelines and the full call for papers can also be found. The Southern Quarterly is an internationally-known scholarly journal devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Southern arts and culture, including the Caribbean and Latin America.

Posted: April 18, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Journal of Festive Studies

The Journal of Festive Studies, a new peer-reviewed journal published under the auspices of H-Net (the interdisciplinary forum for scholars in the humanities and social sciences located at Michigan State University), invites submissions for its first issue, scheduled for March 2018.

The journal's stated aim is to draw together all academics who share an interest in festivities, including but not limited to holiday celebrations, family rituals, carnivals, religious feasts, processions and parades, and civic commemorations. The editors in chief -- Ellen Litwicki, Professor of History at the State University of New York at Fredonia and Aurélie Godet, Associate Professor of US History at Paris Diderot University -- welcome submissions of original research and analysis from both established and emerging scholars worldwide. Besides traditional academic essays, authors may submit video and photo essays, archival notes, opinion pieces, as well as contributions that incorporate digital media such as visualizations and interactive timelines and maps. Academic essays should be between 6,000 and 12,000 words; other pieces should be between 2,000 and 5,000 words. When submitting, please indicate whether the work is to be peer-reviewed as an article or whether yo u would like to offer something in a different format.

For its first issue, the journal will look at festive studies as an emerging academic sub-field since the late 1960s and seeks submissions that consider some of the methods and theories that scholars have relied on to apprehend festive practices across the world. The specific contributions of the historical, geographical, sociological, anthropological, ethnological, psychological, and economic disciplines to the study of festivities may be explored but, more importantly, authors should offer guidelines on how to successfully integrate them. Contributors may also choose to focus on some of the methodological issues faced by scholars doing qualitative research on festivities across the globe. Finally, authors may reflect on whether conclusions about festivities can be derived from the thousands of case studies that are produced every year by scholars, government agents, city officials, and various stakeholders. Can cross-cultural, interdisciplinary theoretical paradigms still be expect ed to emerge from this growing literature?

All texts should be sent by November 1 2017 to submissions-festive-studies@mail.h-net.msu.edu, complete with the author's bio and an abstract of c. 250 words. Please consult the guidelines for authors in advance of submission, and please contact Ellen Litwicki (litwicki@fredonia.edu) or Aurélie Godet (augodet@yahoo.com) for questions concerning the call for papers or suggestions about the journal.

For More Information: https://networks.h-net.org/h-celebration

Posted: April 18, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Trump, the Media, and Communities of Color

CFP: Long Beach Indie Film, Media, and Music Conference
Location: Long Beach, CA (Hilton Long Beach Hotel/Cinemark at the Pike Theaters)
Dates: August 30-September 3, 2017
Abstract Deadline: April 15, 2017

Embracing global diversity, the Long Beach Indie International Film, Media, and Music Conference invites individual papers and full panels representing any topic (e.g. theory, production, history, criticism, preservation, etc.) related to film, television, music, mass communication, journalism, digital media, or the entertainment industry broadly defined.

We are also issuing a special call for papers interrogating or celebrating the following themes broadly defined:

• Gender, Race, and the Entertainment Industry
• Moonlight: Reflections, Imperfections, and Impact
• Narratives of Young Men of Color in Film, Media, and Music
• Trump, the Media, and Communities of Color

The conference takes place during the five-day Long Beach Indie International Film, Media, and Music Festival in Long Beach, California (August 30-September 3, 2017). A 20-minute drive from Hollywood and a 2-minute walk to the Pacific Ocean, Long Beach Indie brings together scholars, creative professionals, and entertainment industry leaders, for five days of screenings, panels, parties, concerts, and special events.

The official conference venues are the Hilton Hotel Long Beach, the Cinemark at the Pike Theaters, and select high end venues throughout scenic downtown Long Beach.

Individual paper proposals should include a maximum 200-word abstract plus the professional credentials/affiliations of the author/presenter.
Panels should include a maximum 200-word abstract plus the specific titles of each individual paper and the professional credentials/affiliations of chair, presenters, and discussant/commentator. Chairs can also serve as a presenter on the panel.
Abstract Deadline: April 15, 2017
To submit go to: www.longbeachindie.com
Send direct inquiries to: info@longbeachindie.com

For More Information: http://www.longbeachindie.com

Posted: April 18, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


OAH Receives Mellon Grant for 2018 Annual Meeting

The Organization of American Historians recently received a two-year, $150,000 grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to increase the reach of the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting.

The OAH Amplified Initiative will broaden the meeting's audience and continue conversations beyond the walls of the in-person meeting. The Mellon grant will allow the work presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting to become available to a broader audience, allowing instructors to engage with new ideas in their classrooms and researchers to access and cite the scholarship presented. Digital audio recordings of the sessions will provide the foundation for this amplified meeting initiative.

The OAH is excited to provide this opportunity to amplify the work of historians both inside the historical community and beyond it.

Read more about the grant and the changes to the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting here.

Posted: February 17, 2017
Tagged: News of the Organization, Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Seminars at the Massachusetts Historical Society

The Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston invites proposals for four of its 2017-2018 seminar series: the Boston Area Seminar in Early American History, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Seminar in Modern American Society and Culture (formerly the Immigration and Urban History Seminar), and the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality, co-sponsored by the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe. Each series meets between 4 and 7 times during the academic year. Sessions typically focus on the discussion of a pre-circulated paper. Topics may extend beyond the reach of the MHS collections. Papers must be available for circulation at least a month before the seminar date. Each committee would like to fill at least two sessions through this CFP. To be considered for a slot, please send your CV and a one-page précis of your paper by March 15 to Conrad E. Wright, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215, or t o cwright@masshist.org. In your proposal, please indicate when your paper will be available for distribution. If there are special scheduling conditions, such as a planned trip to Boston or an extended period when you cannot make a presentation, please so indicate in your proposal. For additional information visit https://www.masshist.org/2012/calendar/seminars

Posted: February 13, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


“Voices of Dissent”: Social Movements and Political Protest in Post-war America

On the evening of April 4, 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered a historic speech before a crowd of 3,000 people at Manhattan's Riverside Church. In his speech, entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence," King condemned the Vietnam War and American Cold War policy and characterized the U.S. government as the "greatest purveyor of violence in the world". Describing Vietnam a "victim [of] deadly Western arrogance", King detailed the war's devastating effects on both America's and Vietnam's poor, and declared that it was a moral imperative for opponents of the war to use "every creative method of protest possible" to halt the war through non-violent means.

On June 2 2017, the fiftieth anniversary of Martin Luther King's Riverside Church speech, the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford is holding a broad inter-disciplinary conference which considers the role that social movements and political protest have played in shaping post-war U.S. history. The conference welcomes papers from scholars at any stage of their career. Proposals are encouraged on topics relating to the politics and culture of protest and dissent in the United States since the 1960s. However, priority may be given to submissions that are broadly concerned with Dr Martin Luther King Jr., the Cold War, or the anti-Vietnam War movement.

Proposals of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a 2-page C.V., should be sent to the organizer (Daniel Rowe) at daniel.rowe@history.ox.ac.uk no later than February 24, 2017. Proposals for individual papers or full panels are welcome. Accepted participants will be notified by mid March.

For More Information: http://www.rai.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/CfP%20Voices%20of%20Dissent.pdf

Posted: January 26, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Oral History Association Annual Meeting 2017

The Oral History Association is accepting proposals for its 2017 meeting to be held October 4-7 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The theme is Engaging Audiences: Oral History and the Public. Read the Call for Papers and instructions for submitting at http://www.oralhistory.org/annual-meeting/2017-call-for-papers/. The deadline for submission is January 31, 2017.

Posted: January 11, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


'Techniques of the Corporation' Conference, University of Toronto

CALL FOR PAPERS: "Techniques of the Corporation"

4-6 May 2017, University of Toronto

How do corporations know themselves and their world? Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological tests, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th-century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

We invite emerging and established scholars in diverse fields (including business history; labour history; anthropology; geography; economic sociology; media studies; critical race studies; architecture studies; feminist and sexuality studies; environmental studies; and cultural studies) to explore the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of corporations. Our overall goal is to crystallize a new field, culminating in a field-defining publication. We welcome work on corporate practices that exceed calculative logics, such as work on social relations, affective and psychological states, and speculative futurities. In addition to traditional papers, the conference encourages creative methods to query corporate forms, including art installations, videos, interactive multimedia projects, and role-playing games. Applications for travel assistance will be arranged after acceptance.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference organizers at corporatetechniques@gmail.com by 13 January 2017.

For More Information: http://corporatetechniques.com/

Posted: January 6, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


2018 OAH Annual Meeting, Sacramento - Call for Proposals

"The Forms of History"--Encouraging proposals from all periods and subjects of American history, the program committee also encourages colleagues to address explicitly the form in which they conceive and present their work.

Read about the exciting changes to affect the Annual Meeting in Sacramento.

Read More>>

Posted: January 3, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 NPS National Underground Railroad Conference - Call for Proposals

The OAH is pleased to be partnering with the National Park Service's Network to Freedom Program to help support the 2017 National Underground Railroad Conference. The conference, "On the Edge of Freedom: Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad in the Borderlands," will be held in Cambridge, Maryland, May 18-21, 2017.

More information about this year's theme and the conference, including hotel and registration information, can be found at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/ugrr/call-for-proposals.htm

The deadline for the receipt of proposals is January 31, 2017, and proposals should be submitted online at: http://www.oah.org/ugrr/

Posted: December 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 Conference on Illinois History

Call for Papers and Proposals for Teacher Workshops
19th Annual Conference on Illinois History
October 5 & 6, 2017
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library
Springfield

The Conference on Illinois History is accepting paper or panel proposals on any aspect of Illinois's history, culture, politics, geography, or archaeology. The Conference especially welcomes submissions exploring the upcoming bicentennial of statehood. We encourage submissions from professional and avocational historians, graduate students, and those engaged in the study of Illinois history at libraries, historic sites, museums, and historical societies.

Proposals are also being accepted for teacher workshops. If you are a teacher who has created an innovative, comprehensive, or timely curriculum on an aspect of Illinois's history, culture, politics, geography, or archaeology, please share your expertise with other teachers at the conference.

The deadline for proposals is May 1, 2017.

To submit your proposal for a paper, panel, or teacher workshop, please send:
• A one-page summary of the topic, including a description of the major primary and secondary sources used.
• A one-page resume for each participant.

Send proposals to: Christian McWhirter, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, 112 N. Sixth St., Springfield, IL 62701, or Christian.mcwhirter@illinois.gov.

For more information, call 217-785-9132 or visit: https://www2.illinois.gov/ihpa/Involved/Pages/Conference.aspx

Posted: December 19, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals for November 2017 National Humanities Conference

National Humanities Conference
The Federation of State Humanities Councils & The National Humanities Alliance
Call for Proposals
Boston, Massachusetts
Thursday, November 2, 2017 through Sunday November 5, 2017

The Federation of State Humanities Councils and the National Humanities Alliance are pleased to announce the 2017 National Humanities Conference. The National Humanities Conference brings the humanities community together as a whole to explore how we can achieve broader public impact and advance the role the humanities play in addressing both local and global challenges.

The 2017 conference asks how humanities practitioners and scholars can deepen, expand, and even re-envision the public role of the humanities. Increasingly, humanists are working to ensure that scholarship, pedagogy, public programs, and preservation play a key role in addressing complex issues of public concern. Cutting-edge scholarship has engendered productive public conversation on divisive issues. Public humanities programs have addressed challenges ranging from climate change to closing the achievement gap. Preservation projects have created the foundations to explore community identity and placemaking. New trends in pedagogy—both at the K-12 and college levels—challenge students to integrate the humanities and STEM in order to think about social and scientific problems holistically and develop novel solutions. These projects take on a multitude of shapes, but they are all impact-driven and all have the humanities at their core.

Together, we will explore these practices and identify ways that a wide-range of collaborations might be drawn on to think even more expansively about the humanities and public life. Building on the 2016 conference's outcomes, we will explore how collaborative approaches can expand the ways that scholars work in a public context; showcase the importance of the humanities in addressing local and global challenges; redefine and expand audiences; and enable new approaches to case-making that draw on quantitative and qualitative data to tell the story of the humanities. We will also examine how collaborations that extend beyond the humanities community—to civic and community organizations, government agencies, STEM fields, and the private sector—create new areas of impact.

For More Information: http://tinyurl.com/gwbnqsv

Deadline for submitting proposals: Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Posted: December 12, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Frank Lloyd Wright and the Buffalo School of Arts and Crafts

At the turn of the century, the Buffalo, NY region was an innovative hub of U.S. industry as well as the epicenter of the American Arts and Crafts movement. The area boasted the lion's share of the most influential figures in American Arts and Crafts such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Charles Rohlfs, Gustav Stickley, Adelaide Robineau, Elbert Hubbard, Dard Hunter, Karl Kipp, among so many others—not to mention Buffalo Pottery, Heintz Metalwork, The Arts and Crafts Shop, etc. On the occasion of the 150th birthday of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, this international conference seeks to address the relation between Buffalo's Arts and Crafts innovators, the industrial prowess and character of the region, and the forces that shaped the Buffalo School of Arts and Crafts in this country and abroad.

Please visit www.art.buffalo.edu/buffaloschoolconference for more information. We invite scholars and graduate students to submit abstracts (maximum 500 words) along with a CV by April 15th, 2017. Sponsored travel and accommodations available for selected participants.

Posted: December 9, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 Muted Voices Conference

Remembering Muted Voices:
Conscience, Dissent, Resistance, and Civil Liberties in World War I through Today
October 19-22, 2017
National World War I Museum and Memorial
Kansas City, MO, USA

On April 6, 1917 the USA entered World War I. A hundred years later in 2017 this Symposium nremembers the muted voices of those who resisted the Great War and the implications of these
stories for today.

Call for Papers
We are now inviting paper proposals for the World War I Symposium. Details of the Call for Papers can be found at https://www.theworldwar.org/remembering-muted-voices. The deadline for paper proposals is March 20, 2017. Please send proposals to John Roth johndr@goshen.edu.

Event Information
An overview of the whole project is available at: https://theworldwar.s3.amazonaws.com/prod/s3fs-public/MutedVoicesOverview.pdf

A draft program, with keynote speakers, is also available at https://theworldwar.s3.amazonaws.com/prod/s3fs-public/MutedVoicesShortProgram.pdf

Event Co-Sponsors
American Civil Liberties Union; American Friends Service Committee; Baptist Peace Fellowship; Brethren Historical Library and Archives; Bruderhof Communities; Greater Kansas City Interfaith Council; Historians against the War; Community of Christ Seminary; Hutterian Communities (3); John Whitmer Historical Association; Peace History Society; Center for Mennonite Brethren Studies, Tabor College, KS; Mennonite Central Committee, US; Mennonite Historical Society; Mennonite Quarterly Review; National World War I Museum and Memorial; Plough Quarterly; The Sider Institute for Anabaptist, Pietist and Wesleyan Studies at Messiah College.

*Co-sponsors are supporting multidisciplinary scholarship on aspects of resistance and dissent in World War I and subsequent events. Co-sponsorship does not imply endorsement of any particular theological, ideological, or political perspective that might be aired at this academic conference.

Further information: Andrew Bolton abolton@cofchrist.org Cell: (+1 USA) 816 739 4986

Posted: December 7, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers