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Calls for Papers

We welcome your call for proposals or papers for upcoming meetings, conferences, or writing projects within the field of US history. Please submit your announcement using this form.

Transatlantic Studies Association 16th Annual Conference

University College Cork, Ireland

July 10-12, 2017

Established in 2002, the TSA is a broad network of scholars who use the 'transatlantic' as a frame of reference for their work in political, economic, cultural, historical, enviromental, literary, and IR/security studies. All transatlantic-themed paper and panel proposals from these and related disciplines are welcome.

This conference thus welcomes papers in the following areas:

  1. History
  2. International Relations and Security Studies
  3. Literature, Film and Culture
  4. Planning and the Enviroment
  5. Economics
  6. Proposals that investigate the 'transatlantic' and explore it through frames of reference such as ideology, empire, race, religion, migration, political mobilisation, or social movements
  7. Proposals that incorporate perspectives that involve north-south and south-south transatlantic connections, as well as north-north

Both panel proposals and individual papers are welcome. Panel proposals are encouraged to include a discussant. New members and junior scholars are especially welcome. 

Please send individual paper proposals (a 300 word abstract + brief CV) and complete panel proposals (300 word overview + 300 word abstracts for the papers + brief CVs) to the conference email tsacork2017@gmail.com

Deadline for panel and paper proposals: 3 February 2017

We aim to make a decision on your proposal within three weeks. 

The Conference Location: 

University College Cork is located in Cork, Ireland along the southern coast of the country. The Transatlantic Studies Association has been to Cork twice before in 2007 and 2012 which attracted above average numbers of delegates. The conference site and university is within walking distance of the city, and within short distances to beautiful seaside towns and beaches and coastal, forest and hill walks. Cork Airport is accessible from a number of European hubs and Dublin and Shannon serve as connections to flights from the United States and elsewhere. Train and bus services connect these airports with Cork. 

Accommodation:

Accommodation in Cork is affordable across the spectrum, including hotels, B&Bs and Student halls of residence. Cork can be busy in the summertime, so it is advisable to book your accommodation early. We have secured accommodation as part of the conference package. This will be available to delegates when registering for the conference on a first come first served basis. For those wishing to make their own arrangements, a list of B&Bs and other hotels will be made available on the conference website.

Conference proposals should be directed to the conference address:

tsacork2017@gmail.com

For further information or enquiries please contact the following:

Chair of TSA/Local Organiser: Professor David Ryan: David.Ryan@ucc.ie

Further details will soon be posted to the Association's website:

http://www.transatlanticstudies.com/

 

Posted: November 30, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: Revisiting the Summer of Love

Revisiting the Summer of Love, Rethinking the Counterculture:
An Academic Conference on the 50th Anniversary of the Summer of Love
July 27 - 29, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Submission Deadline: January 15, 2017
www.summerofloveconference.org

Northwestern University's Center for Civic Engagement and the California Historical Society invite scholars to submit paper proposals for this interdisciplinary conference celebrating and reexamining the Summer of Love and its associated events, contexts, and implications.

As an interdisciplinary meeting, the conference welcomes scholars from all interested fields and theoretical perspectives. Suggested topics include art, from drama and dance to poster art and music; writers and writing, including New Journalism and contemporary theorists; minorities and marginalized populations; GLBT and gender issues; urban studies; and implications of the Summer of Love on today's social movements.

Professors, independent scholars, students, and professionals working outside of the academy are welcome to participate. Adjunct professors and graduate students are particularly encouraged to apply. Limited assistance is available for graduate students and adjunct faculty to help defray the costs of conference participation.

Proposals include an abstract of up to 250 words and a brief bio of no more than 150 words and are due by January 15, 2017.

Learn More & Submit a Proposal: www.summerofloveconference.org

Posted: November 28, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


U.S. Catholic Historian Issue on Athletics

U.S. Catholic Historian
Future Issue: Athletics

For thirty-five years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism. An upcoming issue will address the theme of athletics. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, studies of the following:

• Historical studies of U.S. Catholic participation, ownership, or coaching of athletics, including professional and collegiate levels, etc.
• Biographical studies of Catholic athletes.
• Athletics at Catholic colleges and universities.
• Role of American Catholic ethnics in the development of sports.
• Catholic contributions to the "muscular Christianity" movement.
• Athletics at parish and diocesan level, i.e. Catholic Youth Organization teams and leagues and parish-based sports/recreation centers.
• U.S. Catholic involvement in the Olympics.

Scholars considering a submission are asked to contact the editor, Fr. David Endres at DEndres@Athenaeum.edu before preparing a contribution. Approximate length is 7,000-10,000 words. We ask for submissions by November 1, 2017 and look forward to hearing from potential contributors.

For More Information: http://cuapress.cua.edu/journals/usch.cfm

Posted: November 21, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Ohio Academy of Historians Annual Conference

The Ohio Academy of History seeks papers in all fields of history for its annual conference to be held at The Ohio State University March 31-April 1, 2017. Papers may deal with any area or time period. Proposals focusing on historiography, methodology, pedagogy, and public history are also welcome.

Proposals may consist of individual papers, sessions on a common theme, or discussion panels. Panels might address topics like the following, and we are open to other topics:

The Centennial of President John F. Kennedy's birth
The Centennial of U.S. Entry into World War I
The Obama Administration as History
World-systems and Diversity: Time for deeper history on Mercosur, ASEAN and the African Union?
Technology and History

Paper sessions generally include three papers (20 minutes each) and a chair or commentator. In addition to traditional format sessions (scholarly papers with chair and commentator), the Ohio Academy welcomes non-traditional formats such as roundtables, discussion panels, or teaching-focused formats.

We do not at this time solicit or accept undergraduate papers.

Submit proposals no later than 1 December 2016 (updated deadline) to either Program Committee Co-Chairperson:

Marsha Robinson, PhD, Co-Chairperson
Department of Humanities and Creative Arts
Miami University, Middletown, OH 45042
e-mail: marsha.robinson@miamioh.edu
tel: 513-217-4015

Robert Waters, PhD, JD, Co-Chairperson
Department of History, Politics, and Justice
Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH 45810
e-mail: r-waters@onu.edu
tel: 419-772-2090

Proposals must include:

Those interested in chairing or commenting on papers should contact a committee co-chairperson with their areas of expertise.

Presenters must register for the conference by 1 March 2017 to be included on the program.

For More Information: http://www.ohioacademyofhistory.org/call-for-papers/

Posted: November 15, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Agrarian Reform and Resistance: The Euro-American World, 1815-1914

Call for Papers for an International Conference on Agrarian Reform and Resistance in an 'Age of Globalization': The Euro-American World, 1815-1914

National University of Ireland, Galway
2-3 June 2017

The purpose of this conference is to explore the myriad experiences of agrarian reform and resistance that characterized rural regions of Europe and the Americas, whether based on either free or unfree labour, between 1815 and 1914. In this period, the economic changes associated with the influence of the Industrial Revolution transcended national boundaries, profoundly affecting rural societies by transforming patterns of demand for agricultural commodities. In response to these global processes, 'progressive' landowners, serfowners and slaveholders throughout the Euro-American world endeavoured to rationalize their management of land and labour while embracing scientific farming techniques and technological innovations. The resulting drives for 'improvement' and better market integration typically exacerbated the fundamental economic, political and social inequalities that prevailed in most agrarian regions. In all those regions, the proprietors' effor ts were often resisted by the diverse range of unfree and free labourers who produced agricultural commodities for sale on the world market, including slaves, serfs, sharecroppers, tenants and peasant proprietors. This conference welcomes scholars of rural Europe and the Americas to discuss the possibilities for comparative and transnational research within and between the different agrarian regions of the Euro-American world focusing on the above issues.

Scholars are invited to submit proposals for papers on agrarian reform and resistance, with a special emphasis on the following themes:

- Links between agricultural reformers and landed interests in the Euro-American world.
- Economic, political and social implications of agrarian modernization in local, national or international contexts.
- Strategies of resistance and radical developments among agricultural workers, free and/or unfree.
- The relationship between agricultural improvement and modernity/capitalism in free and unfree labour systems.
- Free and unfree workers' displacement and migration.

We invite prospective speakers of all career levels, including doctoral students, to submit abstracts for 20 minute papers. Each paper proposal should include a 250 word abstract and a one page CV. Please send to agrarianworldconference@gmail.com by the deadline of 6 January 2017.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Sven Beckert (Harvard University)

This conference is a joint initiative of Cathal Smith and Joe Regan at the Centre for the Investigation of Transnational Encounters (CITE) and the Irish Centre for the Histories of Labour and Class (ICHLC) and is hosted by the Moore Institute at the National University of Ireland, Galway.

Posted: November 2, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2018 Quatuor Coronati Conference: Freemasons in the Transatlantic Worlds during the long eighteenth century

September 14-16, 2018. Alexandria, Virginia, George Washington Masonic National Memorial.

The Academic Committee of the 2018 Quatuor Coronati Conference, co-sponsored by Quatuor Coronati Masonic Lodge No. 2076 of the United Grand Lodge of England, and the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, invite proposals for papers presenting new research in the form of biographical or prosopographical findings in the history of Anglo-American Freemasonry during the long eighteenth century, including studies of freemasons in or from Britain, Ireland, all of North America and the Caribbean. Early and mid-career academics are particularly encouraged to apply, though proposals from senior and independent scholars are also welcomed.

Abstracts/proposals of up to 500 words along with a brief CV should be submitted in the body of an email to: susan.sommers@stvincent.edu with "QC 2018" in the subject line. The closing date for submissions is May 1, 2017.

Posted: October 31, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Legacies of the Manhattan Project at 75 Years

The Manhattan Project was, arguably, the defining event of the twentieth century. More even than the Second World War itself, the Manhattan Project and its Cold War legacy altered the course of world history. For decades shrouded in secrecy and nourished by fear, we are only now—some seventy-five years on—beginning to understand the full effects of that event and its complex aftermath.

Predictably, then, the various legacies of the Manhattan Project have been central to a remarkably diverse and cross-disciplinary body of scholarship. Moreover, ongoing declassification of Manhattan Project-era materials and opening of archives has allowed access to new sources that have forced reevaluations of key decisions and outcomes in virtually every field of research touching on the atomic and nuclear age.

"Legacies of the Manhattan Project" will bring these disparate academic conversations together at a key moment for understanding the origins and consequences of our nuclear past, present, and future.

We invite papers that deal with any aspect of this topic, regardless of disciplinary perspective. Possible themes include (but are not limited to) reconsiderations of

· the rise of the military-industrial complex
· the history of science and technology
· the sociology and politics of the Cold War
· environmental impacts and waste remediation
· literatures of the environment
· the impact of technology on the American West and its
indigenous and settler cultures.

We welcome submissions from both established and emerging scholars for 20 minute panel papers, panel proposals of 3-4 panelists, and plenary sessions of no more than 60 minutes.

Please direct abstracts (not to exceed 250 words) and inquiries to ourhanfordhistory@tricity.wsu.edu no later than January 6, 2017.

For More Information: http://www.tricities.wsu.edu/hanfordhistory

Posted: October 19, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


U.S. Catholic Historian: Sacraments and Sacramentals

For more than thirty years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism. An upcoming issue will address the theme of sacraments and sacramentals. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, studies of the following:

Scholars considering a submission are asked to contact the editor, Fr. David Endres at DEndres@Athenaeum.edu before preparing a contribution. Approximate length is 7,000-10,000 words. We ask for submissions by September 1, 2017 and look forward to hearing from potential contributors.

Fr. David Endres
Editor, U.S. Catholic Historian
DEndres@Athenaeum.edu

Posted: September 22, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence

Please see the attached call for papers regarding a conference titled "Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence" at Yale University on February 24-25, 2017. This conference will focus on issues of science and racial violence as objects of historical study, as well as consider lingering inequalities and injustices within history as a discipline. We further hope to share strategies for deploying academic scholarship as activism and explore tactics for building alliances with communities of activists outside the academy.

In conjunction with the conference, we are co-sponsoring a panel with the Program for the Humanities in Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. The panel will feature Craig Wilder, the Barton L. Weller Professor of History at MIT, and a number of Yale faculty and community members. The panel will address Yale's historical links to slavery, the significance of naming the college "Calhoun" in the 1930s, the impact of racialized trauma on mental health, and the longer history of protest against names associated with slavery, such as "Calhoun," at American universities.

Please circulate this call for papers widely to any who might be interested.

https://goo.gl/sV2NUp

Posted: September 22, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Vernacular Architecture Forum 2017 Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah

The Vernacular Architecture Forum (www.vafweb.org) invites paper proposals for its 36th Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31-June 3, 2017. Papers may address vernacular and everyday buildings, sites, or cultural landscapes worldwide. Submissions on all relevant topics are welcome but we encourage papers exploring western American themes, including ethnic settlement, landscapes of ranching, mining, and agriculture, urbanization, religious expression, Native American identity, and the creation of vacation and recreation landscapes. Additionally, the VAF is launching a multi-year program of inquiry into the distinctiveness of the VAF and the vernacular architecture movement. To this end, we encourage papers that consider this field over time. How does the wide range of VAF projects (tours, guidebooks, book and article awards, field schools, annual conference papers, publications, etc.) demonstrate how our questions, concerns, and methods have changed and evolved? Whe re do we see evidence of that history in our current work, and what might our future look like? Proposals might focus on a particular building type (i.e. houses, barns), a research strategy (fieldwork), political or theoretical convictions (Gender, Marxism, the Everyday, etc), or particular approaches to presenting our work and engaging colleagues and the public.

Students and young professionals may also apply for the Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships offering support of up to $500 to presenting papers at VAF's annual conference.

SUBMITTING AN ABSTRACT
Papers should be analytical rather than descriptive, and no more than twenty minutes in length. Proposals for complete sessions, roundtable discussions or other innovative means that facilitate scholarly discourse are especially encouraged. At least one session will be devoted to Field Notes – shorter papers (five to eight minutes in length) that introduce new techniques, innovations, and discoveries in documenting vernacular buildings and landscapes. Proposals should clearly state the argument of the paper and explain the methodology and content in fewer than 400 words. Make sure to indicate if it is a regular paper proposal or a shorter fieldwork proposal. Please include the paper title, author's name, email address, a one-page c.v. You may include up to two images with your submission. Note that presenters must deliver their papers in person and be VAF members at the time of the conference. Speakers who do not register for the conference by March 1, 2017, will be withdrawn. Please do not submit an abstract if you are not committed to attending the papers session on Saturday, June 3rd.

THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS OCTOBER 30, 2016. The abstracts and c.v. should be emailed as a PDF attachment to the VAF Papers Committee Chair, Daves Rossell, at papers@vafweb.org. For general information about the Salt Lake City conference, please visit the conference website at the www.vafweb.org/saltlakecity-2017 or contact Alison Flanders at saltlakecity@vafweb.org.

Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships:
VAF's Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowships offer a limited amount of financial assistance to students and young professionals presenting papers at VAF's annual conference. Awards are intended to offset travel and registration costs for students, and to attract developing scholars to the organization. Any person presenting a paper who is currently enrolled in a degree-granting program, or who has received a degree within one year of the annual conference is eligible to apply. Awards cannot exceed $500. Previous awardees are ineligible, even if their status has changed. Recipients are expected to participate fully in the conference, including tours and workshops.

To apply, submit with your abstract a one-page attachment with "Simpson Presenter's Fellowship" at the top and the following information: 1) name, 2) institution or former institution, 3) degree program, 4) date of degree (received or anticipated), 5) mailing address, 6) permanent email address, 7) telephone number, and 8) paper title.

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 Cryptologic History Symposium

The Center for Cryptologic History invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the biennial Symposium on Cryptologic History which will take place October 19 - 20, 2017. The Symposium will be held at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Center in Laurel, Maryland. Following the Symposium, on Saturday, October 21, participants will be given an opportunity to tour the National Cryptologic Museum and participate in a workshop on sources for research in cryptologic history.

The theme for the 2017 Symposium will be "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum." There are many milestones to mark in 2017: the 160th anniversary of the first attempt to span the Atlantic with a telegraph cable, 100 years since both the entry of the United States into World War I and the Russian October Revolution, and 75 years after the World War II battles of Coral Sea and Midway. Our Symposium will take place just a few months before the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, and during the 25th year after the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Papers looking at these milestone events in cryptology and considering how we remember their significance are particularly encouraged, as are those examining how cryptologic advances from these times provided momentum to create the systems of today and the future.

We are also eager to have proposals on cryptologic topics that diverge from the theme. Submissions from those who are new to the field, particularly graduate students, are very welcome. This will ensure the variety and diversity of exchange that has been the hallmark of this event.

There will be a World War I-specific track to mark the centennial of American participation in that war and the birth of modern signals intelligence.

Proposals:
The proposals and papers must be unclassified. We encourage proposals for single presentations and full panels; the program committee may form panels from single presentations with like topics. Presenters should be prepared to speak for 15-20 minutes; proposals for a longer time slot should include a strong justification.

Your proposal package should include an abstract of no more than ONE page, a complete CV, a short biographical sketch (not to exceed 150 words) to be used in the program, the amount of time you require for your paper, and full contact details. Panel proposals should include the above for each presenter and a short explanation of the panel's theme.

Please submit your proposal by noon on Monday, February 6, 2017, to Program Chair Betsy Rohaly Smoot at history@nsa.gov or to her care at The Center for Cryptologic History, Suite 6886, 9800 Savage Road, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755. Please note that correspondence that does not include the suite number may not be delivered in a timely manner. Proposals received after noon on February 6 will be considered on a space-available basis. The program committee will notify you about the final status of your proposal by June 9, 2017, but may engage you in discussions before that date.

For More Information: https://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic-heritage/center-cryptologic-history/

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Historical Sociolinguistics Network 2017 Meeting

Historical Sociolinguistics Network 2017
CUNY Graduate Center/New York University
New York City, April 6–7, 2017
Examining the Social in Historical Sociolinguistics: Methods and Theory

The 2017 international meeting of the Historical Sociolinguistics Network (HiSoN) will be held April 6–7, 2017, to be co-hosted by the City University of New York's Graduate Center and New York University. This year's conference will feature plenaries by three noted scholars in the field: Anita Auer, Professor of English Linguistics at the Université de Lausanne; Nils Langer, Professor of North Frisian and Minority Issues at the University of Flensburg; and Donald Tuten, Associate Professor of Spanish and Linguistics at Emory University. For more information about the Historical Sociolinguistics Network, visit http://hison.sbg.ac.at/.

The conference welcomes submissions for roundtables, panels, individual presentations, and workshops on themes addressed by researchers working in historical sociolinguistics. We take a broad view of the field that includes the reconstruction of linguistic variation and change; the ideological analysis of linguistic history; the cultural and social history of languages; the relation between language and literary history; and the analysis or collation of linguistic corpora of various languages and historical periods. Scholars working with or on language within disciplines and theoretical frameworks other than those typically associated with sociolinguistics—such as linguistic anthropology, literary analysis, cultural studies or history—are encouraged to submit proposals.

The conference co-hosts particularly invite submissions focusing on the theme of "Examining the Social in Historical Sociolinguistics: Methods and Theory." One of the central intersections between the multiple disciplines represented by those working on the history of languages remains the social, a term with a complicated theoretical pedigree that has changed in its use and meaning significantly from decade to decade. This volatility in meaning and utility from a methodological standpoint stands in contrast to its importance to the field of historical sociolinguistics. The "social" is a term that offers both the opportunity for interdisciplinary and collaborative understanding of the relationship between communities and changes in the language they speak, as well as the risk of uncertainty and even obsolescence as a means of describing the bonds and functions of speech communities.

Given the unique position of scholars of the history of language to collaboratively define the social from both a linguistic and a historical standpoint, how might this concept be theorized going forward? How has our understanding of the social changed in the context of new findings brought by expanded access to historical corpora in digital form, the increasingly sophisticated focus by historians and literary scholars on the working of power in society, and more clearly defined methods of exploring internal and external linguistic change than ever before? We invite contributors seeking to understand this and other current research questions related to the history of language, broadly defined.

Panel and roundtable submissions should include 3 to 4 participants. Individual paper proposals should be 250 words in length, and should include a brief (50-word) bio of the submitter. Panel and roundtable proposals should be 500 words total in length and include a description of the session as well as brief descriptions of each paper and short bios (an additional 50 words) for each participant. The deadline for abstracts is 1 November 2016. Please upload proposals at http://hison2017.info/submissions.html. For questions, please contact the conference organizers at hison2017@gmail.com.

For More Information: http://hison.info

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


Conference on Migrations and Borders, Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

"Migrations and borders in the United States: discourses, representations, imaginary contexts." Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

CFP: "Migrations and borders in the United States: discourses, representations, imaginary contexts." Grenoble, France, 29-31 March 2017

Migration studies are at the core of American history. Whether voluntary or involuntary, migrations peopled the continent. Waves of immigration have created an American identity which is continuously modified by new arrivals and changing patterns of cultural transmission and dominance. While cultural mobility seems to be an unstoppable global phenomenon, local resistance, mainly among minorities, is observed. Cultures—or cultural traits—also migrate on their own, disregarding borders.

The international borders of the United States have evolved from a moving 'frontier' line and have reached their present state in the 19th century. International borders have evolved from porous to tight, first on the Mexican border, and after 9/11, also on the Canadian border. 'Borderland' studies (Herbert Bolton) date back to the early decades of the 20th Century but experience a renewal. Other internal 'borders' are continuously shifting: borders between different land-use areas—protected vs unprotected, land lost or gained by Native American Nations, land claimed as Hispanic 'land grants', gentrified neighborhoods, urban sprawl and imploding cities.

The present conference aims to analyze the discourse, the representation and the imaginary contexts linked to migrations and borders in the United States. We welcome interdisciplinary proposals for papers in English and French from the fields of history, cultural, political and discourse studies, sociology, geography, and anthropology. The following themes may be discussed from an historic perspective or from a contemporary viewpoint:

- Migrations, temporary or permanent, economic as well as touristic and educational; the impact of migrants on American society and identity,
- New visions of border security; the cost of maintaining international borders,
- Shifting identities in America, from the colonial period to the 21st century; constructed and re-constructed identities, diasporas,
- Contact cultures, borderless cultures and local cultures; cultural mobility in the United States; the concept of cultural appropriation.

Deadline for proposals: December 15th, 2016; you will receive an answer on January 15.

Proposals are accepted in English or French (250 words maximum plus short bio 80 words maximum) are to be sent on one page with postal and email address to:

Susanne Berthier-Foglar (Université Grenoble Alpes, France)
susanne.berthier@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr
and
Paul Otto (George Fox University, OR, United States)
potto@georgefox.edu

For More Information: http://ilcea4.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/fr/agenda/colloques/migrations-et-frontieres-aux-etats-unis-discours-representations-imaginaires-migrations-and-borders-in-the-united-states-discourses-representations-imaginary-contexts--86027.kjsp

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Correction - Ohio Academy of History Annual Meeting/Corrected Dates

Ohio Academy of History Annual Meeting
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

7 April -- 8 April 2017

The Ohio Academy of History seeks papers or panels in all fields of history for its annual conference. Of particular interest are panels on:

In addition to traditional format sessions, we welcome non-traditional formats such as roundtables, discussion panels, or teaching-focused formats. We do not accept undergraduate papers.

Submit proposals by 1 November 2016 to either Program Committee Co-Chairperson:

Dr. Marsha Robinson
Miami University
marsha.robinson@miamioh.edu
513-217-4015


Dr. Robert Waters
Ohio Northern University
r-waters@onu.edu
419-772-2090

Proposals must include:

Those interested in chairing or commenting should contact a committee co-chairperson with their areas of expertise.

Presenters must register for the conference by 1 March 2017 to be included in the program.

Further information about the Ohio Academy, including membership and conference registration (when available), may be found on our website: http://www.ohioacademyofhistory.org/call-for-papers/

Posted: September 20, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Freedom

A conference in the Ethyle R. Wolfe Series on Classical Studies and the Contemporary World
May 19-20, 2017
Brooklyn College, City University of New York

The rhetorics of freedom and liberty permeate the political discourse of the present and Greco-Roman antiquity. Speakers judge this language and its associated symbols positively, and assume their audiences do as well. But the principles defining freedom, and its associated values, can and do shift dramatically from one context to another. In short we can all agree freedom is good, but we cannot agree what it means to be free. One of the key sites of contention is who needs to sacrifice what in order to achieve liberty and what costs must be paid to preserve freedom. The pursuit of liberty is directly linked to whose freedom matters as well as who bears - and who is assumed to bear - the associated costs. All of this is especially true any discussion of slavery.

This conference will bring scholars from numerous disciplines into conversation across the historical timeline to examine how debt, value and payment work to create freedom, liberty and slavery. Although these are slippery concepts, rather than simply viewing these terms as rhetorical devices that make freedom seem worthwhile, we deploy debt, value, and payment as analytical tools for understanding why slavery harms and why freedom matters. Because various discourses - ranging from religion to science and from ethics to economics - use these terms to describe freedom, whether as physical labor or a mental activity, we will also investigate debt, value and payment themselves. Often our methods of assessments bleed one into another, especially in conversations regarding individual and shared liberties.

By juxtaposing the different methodologies scholars use to ask "what does freedom cost?" from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present, we will explore overlapping areas of research and expand the existing conversations in each discipline. In addition to providing vocabularies, practices and theories of freedom that we still use today, Ancient Greece and Rome provide many examples of peoples who lacked freedom but strove for it, including slaves, women and conquered peoples. By examining Greco-Roman antiquity and modernity, we bring to light recurrent historical patterns of the costs that people have and continue pay for freedom.

Our ultimate goal is to produce a rigorous edited volume of the most substantial and unified conference contributions for publication by a major university press.
Our confirmed keynote speakers include, Orlando Patterson (John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Harvard University), Saidiya Hartman (Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University) and Deborah Kamen (Associate Professor, Classics, University of Washington). We are seeking contributions for at least four panels of 3-4 participants each. We hope to attract participation from a wide range of academic disciplines and from scholars at all levels, and will try to reflect this diversity in our creation of each broad panel. Examples of possible panel titles might be: "Themes of Freedom and Payment in the Novel", "The Economics of Emancipation", "Cross-Cultural Political Theories of Sacrifices and Liberty", "Comparative Histories of Debt-Bondage", or "The Shifting Demographics of Civil Liberties".

We will be offering a minimum of six bursaries of up to 500 dollars to be awarded on the basis of greatest need, taking into account access to institutional funding and the distance of the conference from the participant's home institution.

October 31, 2016 is the deadline for the submission of abstracts. Please include the following as separate files: (1) title, abstract of 300-500 words, a one page bibliography (no self identifying information please!); (2) your name, title of your proposed talk, institutional affiliation, short academic biography, and an indication of whether you would like to be consider for a bursary, a budget for the amount requested, and any information we should take into consideration when making our bursary allocations.

These two files (PDF or MSWord preferred) should be sent to: c-f-p@debtandslavery.com

General questions on this conference should be sent to: queries@debtandslavery.com

We hope to notify successful applicants by November 15.

March 31, 2017 will be the deadline for submission of draft papers for pre-circulation among fellow panelists and organizers.

We will also invite poster submissions from undergraduates conducting research on related themes; the deadline for poster proposals will be March 1, 2017.

Please note that deadlines are subject to change. For the most recent announcements about deadlines, see our website: https://debtandslavery.com/

Posted: August 18, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

We are delighted to announce that Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is now accepting submissions for our premiere issue to be published in Spring 2017. A semiannual peer-reviewed publication from the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS will be available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries' relationships with their unique environments. LCHS brings together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library workers and users. There are no limits of time and space, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, and academic libraries, special collections and manuscripts). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women's Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 1, issue 1, are due August 29, 2016.

Manuscripts may be submitted electronically through LCHS's Editorial Manager system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/default.aspx. They must also conform to the instructions for authors at http://bit.ly/LCHScfp1.

We are excited to see this journal become a reality and welcome your thoughts (and submissions!) as we create a new platform for studying libraries within their broader humanistic and social contexts.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

Posted: August 3, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


A Workshop on Legal Migrations, Vulnerability, and Resilience

Dec. 9-10 2016, Emory University

This workshop will interrogate the experience of traversing borders between legal forms through the lens of vulnerability theory. Contemporary legal scholarship most often devotes attention to status categories conceived as static positions of relative privilege or disadvantage. Vulnerability theory, which challenges the dominant conception of the universal politico-legal subject as an autonomous, independent, and static adult, shifts us toward a dynamic lens of analysis. Vulnerability theory focuses on the evolution of human needs across a life course, asking how law does and should respond to dependence and foster resilience over time. The theory recognizes that human beings are constantly susceptible to change, positive and negative, in our bodily, social, and environmental circumstances. This workshop will explore how we might understand the processes of 'legal migration' as dynamic responses to human and institutional vulnerability.

We are concerned, in particular, with legal migration processes as opportunities to foster resilience. Vulnerability is both universal and constant. Resilience, by contrast, may be created and fostered by the distribution of assets: social, political, environmental, economic, and cultural. The workshop asks how law might foster resilience as individuals and groups migrate between legal forms. In what ways does this migration foster resilience, reorder dependencies, or expose different forms of vulnerability? How do "legal migrants" change the institutions and categories they inhabit? The advent of same-sex marriage, for example, provides the occasion to study the migration of tens of thousands of couples from civil unions or a status of legal non-recognition to the privileged status of marriage. We invite scholars to consider multiple experiences of legal migration: from non-married to married; child to adult; not guilty to guilty; migrant to asylum seeker and possibly ci tizen; contractual agents to partners; union member to sovereign nation.

We encourage participation from scholars in multiple disciplines including law, the social sciences, and humanities, and welcome papers which address the response to human and institutional vulnerability occasioned by processes of migration. Papers are invited to examine social experience as well as legal formalities, while topics may vary widely from transitions in corporate entity or financial institution status (particularly in contexts of economic development or flux); shifts in intellectual property treatment; the migration process of immigrants, asylum seekers, or business entities across sovereign borders; to the criminal justice process. Papers which engage vulnerability theory as a central tool of analysis are most warmly welcomed.

Submissions Procedure:
Email a proposal of several paragraphs as a Word or PDF document by September 16, 2016 to Rachel Ezrol, rezrol@emory.edu.

Decisions will be made by September 30, 2016 and working paper drafts will be due November 23, 2016 so they can be duplicated and distributed prior to the Workshop.

Workshop Details:
The Workshop begins Friday, December 9 at 4PM at Emory University School of Law. Dinner follows Friday's session. Panels continue on Saturday, December 10 from 9 AM to 5 PM; breakfast and lunch will be provided.

For More Information: http://web.gs.emory.edu/vulnerability

Posted: August 3, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Society for Applied Anthropology 77th Annual Meeting

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 77th Annual Meeting in Santa Fe, NM, March 28-April 1, 2017. The theme of the Program is "Trails, Traditions, and New Directions."

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2016. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net, click on "Annual Meeting").

If you have a webpage for links, please add the following:

The Society for Applied Anthropology is pleased to announce our 77th Annual Meeting in Santa Fe, NM, March 28-April 1, 2017.
For meeting information visit www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Melissa Cope
Society for Applied Anthropology
PO Box 2436
Oklahoma City, OK 73101
405-843-5113
405-843-8553 (fax)
melissa@sfaa.net

Posted: June 23, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


International Conference on the Blues

Delta State University is now accepting proposals for papers, presentations, workshops, and clinics for the Third Annual International Conference on the Blues, which will be held October 2 – 4, 2016.
Topics of general interest to scholars and enthusiasts are welcome: African American musical tradition and its influence on American music and culture; the Blues; folklore; history; ethnicity; and the Delta. Topics of interdisciplinary nature are also encouraged.

Deadline: July 1, 2016

Papers are invited from all blues scholars, with a particular emphasis on young and emerging scholars (graduate students, recent masters and doctoral graduates, and junior faculty), as well as established scholars, authors, performers, blues enthusiasts, and independent researchers. A prize will be awarded to the outstanding young scholar paper.

You are invited to submit proposals for paper presentations, lecture-performances, panels, performances, and workshops. Offers to serve as moderators are also welcome. Papers will be 20 minutes in length, with an additional ten minutes for discussion, and should address a general audience. Proposals must be submitted online via www.deltastate.edu/blues.

Please include a description of the presentation, audio/visual equipment needs, and biographical information for all presenters. Please note that not all A/V requests will be granted. Presenters agree to appear at the conference at their own expense, which will include registration fees.

For more information, please contact Shelley Collins and Don Allan Mitchell at blues@deltastate.edu or visit www.deltastate.edu/blues.
The International Conference on the Blues consists of three days of intense academic and scholarly activity and music. This annual conference falls in between the Mighty Mississippi Music Festival in Greenville, Mississippi and the King Biscuit Blues Festival in Helena, Arkansas.

Academic presentations, Blues performances, a "Blues in the Round" jam session, and excursions to local historical attractions add appeal for all audiences. Cleveland, Mississippi, recently named by Smithsonian Magazine as #2 of the top 20 small cities to visit in the country, is located 45 minutes from the Greenville (MS) Airport and approximately two hours from the Memphis (TN) and Jackson (MS) airports. Cleveland is home to Delta State University and the recently-opened GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, and is a ten minute drive from renowned Blues sights including Dockery Farms and Po' Monkey's Lounge.

Posted: June 14, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers


National Council on Public History 2017 Annual Meeting

"The Middle: Where did we come from? Where are we going?"
National Council on Public History Annual Meeting
Indianapolis, Indiana | April 19-22, 2017
The Call for Proposals is open through July 15, 2016 at http://ncph.org/conference/2017-annual-meeting/.

Deadline: July 15, 2016 for final proposals. To solicit feedback or find collaborators, submit an early topic proposal by June 1, 2016.

The National Council on Public History will meet in Indianapolis, Indiana April 19-22, 2017, to consider "The Middle," and we need your ideas to make this meeting a success. If your work involves exploring history with non-academic audiences –whether through museums, historic preservation, government work, libraries and archives, tourism, cultural resources management, history education, art, digital history, or community history – or training historians to do the same, NCPH's annual meeting is your natural home.

In a society fascinated by extremes, the middle is often undervalued, overlooked, and unstudied. Public historians, however, tend to engage in work that addresses the interests and concerns of the wide-ranging public, not just the select. For public historians, the middle can be a delightful but challenging place. The concerns of the masses, not just the elite; the swirling firmament of the center of a story, not only the clearness of the beginning or end; the quotidian, not the extraordinary; is always ripe with ambiguity and importance. But who controls and speaks for the middle? How one parses the middle, and who gets to tell the story, is challenging and difficult.

We welcome submissions from all areas of the field; proposals may address any area of public history, but we especially welcome submissions which relate to our theme. Sessions are 1.5 hours; significant time for audience discussion should be included in every session. We urge participants to dispense with the reading of papers.

Posted: May 24, 2016
Tagged: Calls for Papers