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News in American History

News of the Profession

“News of the Profession” includes announcements of special interest to American historians and practitioners at all levels. Please submit your announcement using this form.

Constitutional Scholar Maeva Marcus to Edit Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise Supreme Court History Series

The Library of Congress and the Permanent Committee of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise announce the appointment of OAH member Maeva Marcus as the general editor of the "Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the Supreme Court of the United States." Marcus, a constitutional scholar with special expertise in the history of the United States Supreme Court, is the third person to serve as editor in the publication's 60-year history.

Holmes, who served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1902 to 1932, left a donation (devise) in his will—later augmented by Congress—to document and disseminate the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise was established by Congress in 1955 to administer the fund and oversee the project. To date, 10 volumes have been published and three others have been commissioned, covering the period 1789 to 1976. The next volume, covering the Earl Warren court, will be published by Cambridge Press in 2017.

Marcus is the founding director of the Institute for Constitutional History at the New-York Historical Society and George Washington University Law School, where she is also Research Professor of Law. The institute enlists leading scholars to offer seminars to graduate students, junior faculty, journalists, and interested laypeople on key issues in American constitutional history.

She served as editor of the eight-volume "Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789-1800" (Columbia University Press, 1985-2007), which is regularly cited in opinions by judges throughout the federal court system. She is also co-editor of the Cambridge University Press series "Studies on the American Constitution." She is the author of "Truman and the Steel Seizure Case: The Limits of Presidential Power" (Columbia University Press, 1977), as well as numerous essays on constitutional, legal and judicial history. Professor Marcus has also served as an OAH distinguished lecturer for the last 14 years. 

A member of the Permanent Committee of the Holmes Devise from 2001 to 2009, Marcus has served as president of the American Society for Legal History and now serves as historian of the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit. Marcus earned her Ph.D. in history from Columbia University.

Marcus was appointed general editor of the Holmes Devise History of the Supreme Court by former Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, who served as chair (ex officio) of the Permanent Committee until his retirement on Sept. 30, 2015. Marcus succeeds Stanley N. Katz, president emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies and professor of public and international affairs at Princeton University, who has served a co-general editor of the Holmes Devise History of the Supreme Court from 1978 to 1989 and as general editor from 1990 to 2015. He will continue to advise the Permanent Committee as general editor emeritus.

The Permanent Committee has five members, including the Librarian of Congress and four presidentially appointed members, who each may serve an eight-year term. Current members are Rachel Moran, dean of the University of California at Los Angeles Law School; Linda Kerber, a past president of the American Historical Association and Harmswoth Professor at Oxford University; and Les Benedict, professor emeritus at Ohio State University. One position is vacant.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation's first-established federal cultural institution. The Library seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications and exhibitions. Many of the Library's rich resources can be accessed through its website at loc.gov.

Posted: November 17, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession, Clio's Kudos


NEH Turns 50

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) this week will kick off a year-long celebration of the agency's 50th anniversary.

Fifty years ago, on September 29, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 at a White House Rose Garden ceremony, attended by scholars, artists, educators, political leaders, and other luminaries. (Read a history of how NEH got its start).

The law created the National Endowment for the Humanities as an independent federal agency, the first grand public investment in American culture. It identified the need for a national cultural agency that would preserve America's rich history and cultural heritage, and encourage and support scholarship and innovation in history, archeology, philosophy, literature, and other humanities disciplines.

 To read more about the history of the NEH or to see a list of highlights of the anniversary celebrations, click here.

Posted: September 30, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


RUSA Genealogy and History Achievement Award

Established in 1992, and sponsored by ProQuest, this award presents a citation and $1,500* cash to a librarian or library in recognition of their professional achievement in historical or genealogical reference, service or research. The recipient shall be selected for exceptional accomplishment in one or more of the following areas: professional association leadership and/or service and training; reference services; publication of recent, important, and highly regarded print or web based reference works; or digital projects that offer important access to genealogical or historical sources.

This award presents a citation and $1,500* cash to a librarian, library or publisher, in recognition of professional achievement in historical or genealogical reference, service, or research librarianship. The recipient shall be selected for exceptional accomplishment in one or more of the following areas: leadership; service; training; reference; or publication of recent, significant print or digital reference works/projects that offer access to genealogical or historical sources.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Nomination materials should include the following:

Questions may be directed to the committee chair, Helen Gbala, gbalah@cod.edu.

*Monetary award amounts are subject to change without notice and are contingent upon donor funding supplied at the time the award is presented. Questions about these awards should be directed to the committee chairperson or to Leighann Wood, RUSA awards program coordinator, at lwood@ala.org.

For more information, please visit http://www.ala.org/rusa/awards/genealogicalpublishing

Posted: September 30, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


The American Academy in Rome Invites Applications for the 2016 Rome Prize

For over a century, the Academy has awarded the Rome Prize to support innovative work in the arts and humanities. Through a national juried competition, Rome Prizes are awarded to emerging and established artists and scholars working in the following disciplines:

Ranging from six months to two years, the thirty fellowships include a stipend, room and board, and individual workspace at the Academy's eleven-acre center in Rome.

Submissions due: NOVEMBER 1, 2015

Visit aarome.org/apply for guidelines.

Posted: September 23, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


Two Longtime OAH Members Receive National Humanities Medals

The Organization of American Historians is delighted and honored to learn that Past OAH President Vicki Lynn Ruiz and longtime member Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham have been named by President Obama as two of the ten distinguished recipients of the 2014 National Humanities Medal. The National Humanities Medal is the nation's highest award recognizing individuals, groups, and institutions for transformative research, scholarship, and public engagement that advance the humanities and deepen our understanding of American life, history, and culture.

The National Humanities Medal honors Professor Ruiz "for her contributions as a historian. In monographs and edited volumes, Dr. Ruiz has pioneered the history of twentieth-century Latinas in a distinguished career that began with collecting oral testimony from Mexican immigrants who worked in U.S. canning factories."

Professor Ruiz received her Ph.D. at Stanford University and is Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of many articles and her books include From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America; Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950, and co-edited and co-authored books, including the three-volume encyclopedia, Latinas in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia, and a major textbook, Created Equal: A Social and Political History of the United States, now in its fourth edition.

The National Humanities Medal honors Professor Higginbotham "for illuminating the African-American journey. In her writings and edited volumes, Dr. Higginbotham has traced the course of African-American progress, and deepened our understanding of the American story."

Professor Higginbotham received her Ph.D. at the University of Rochester and is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American History at Harvard University. She is the author of Righteous Discontent: The Women's Movement in the Black Baptist Church: 1880-1920, co-editor of The Harvard Guide to African-American History and the 12-volume African American National Biography, and co-author, with the late John Hope Franklin, of the ninth edition of From Slavery to Freedom.

The OAH congratulates Professors Ruiz and Higginbotham on the honor of the National Humanities Medal and for their contributions to an informed citizenry and a more thoughtful national life.

"The National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to join President Obama in celebrating the achievements of these distinguished medalists," said NEH Chairman William Adams. "The recipients of this medal have sparked our imaginations, ignited our passions, and transformed our cultural understanding. They embody how the humanities can serve a common good." The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), founded in 1965 as an independent federal agency, manages the nominations process for the National Humanities Medal on behalf of the White House.

The first National Humanities Medal was awarded in 1996. Since then, 175 have been bestowed – to 163 individuals and twelve organizations – inclusive of this year's recipients. A complete list of previous honorees is available at this link. Last year, three OAH past presidents (David Brion Davis, Darlene Clark Hine, and Anne Firor Scott) were awarded the medal, and since its inception, several other OAH members including former OAH presidents and current OAH Vice President Ed Ayers all have received the award.

The humanities medal will be presented along with the 2014 National Medal of Arts by President Obama during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on September 10. After the ceremony, the medalists and their families and friends will join the President and First Lady Michelle Obama for a reception in their honor. The ceremony will be live-streamed at 3 PM on Thursday, September 10 at www.WhiteHouse.gov/live

Posted: September 4, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


Action Alert: National Humanities Alliance

Act now to prevent deep cuts to funding for international education.

The Senate has proposed deep cuts to Title VI and Fulbright-Hays.

These programs are crucial for educating U.S. students for our interconnected world and training experts in foreign languages and cultures.

The proposed cut would slash $25 million (35%) from Title VI and Fulbright-Hays, and it has already passed out of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

This comes after a drastic cut in 2010 and would amount to a 63% reduction over five years!

What's at stake?

Click here for more information on Title VI programs and the status of the appropriations process.

Send a message to Congress now.
We need to speak out now to ensure that the Senate bill does not advance any further. The House appropriations committee has already approved funding at the current level. Your voice will help ensure that these crucial international education programs remain intact.

For more information about the National Humanities Alliance, click here.

Posted: August 26, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Advocacy


U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (USCAVC) Seeking Proposals

CONTENT
The U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (USCAVC) seeks proposals for a scholarly book on the history of the creation and the first 25 years of the Court. If the Court determines to publish such a book, the book will describe judicial review of veterans appeals and the effect of the Court upon veterans' benefits and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) claims and appeals process. Possible topics could include:

Efforts of veterans and organizations to obtain judicial review of veterans benefits decisions

Legislative history and the process involved in the creation of the Court

The Early Phase of the Court's History, including

Later Phases of Court history, including significant events since inception

Unique features of the Court and their impact

Significant decisions of the Court

Sources will include published records of the Court, other published accounts (such as journal articles, Congressional legislative records, and VA records), statistics, and oral histories.

FORMAT
The book will be a hard cover illustrated history of approximately 100-200 pages in length not including the table of contents, index and appendices. The book size is expected to be 6.75" x 10".

TERMS OF SERVICE
The Court will pay reasonable author's fees plus expenses. The Court will not pay any fees incurred for the preparation of any bidder's response to this Request for Proposals.

There will be a series of deadlines for deliverables and drafts to the Court for review, with the ultimate time for the author(s) to complete the draft to be approximately one year from the signing of a contract.

RIGHTS TO THE WORK
The Court will retain exclusive right to publish the materials. The author will be provided a specified number of copies for personal use and not for resale.

SELECTION CRITERIA
Selection is at the sole discretion of the Court but if a selection is made, it will be made based upon the Best Value. Factors considered will include:

Selection and any resulting contract will be in compliance with the Court's procurement policy and all applicable federal laws. Award of a contract is contingent on the absence of, or the absence of appearance of, any conflicts of interest, as determined by the Court, between the bidder and the Court.

PROPOSALS AND DEADLINE
All proposals should include the following:

Deadline for the submission of proposals is November 30, 2015.

Proposals should be sent as email attachments to:

Gregory O. Block
Clerk of the Court
United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 900
Washington, D.C. 20004
Email: contracting@uscourts.cavc.gov

QUESTIONS
Questions should be directed to the Clerk of the Court care of the email address noted above. Answers to questions will be sent by reply email, and all questions and answers submitted will be published for review on our Court website (www.uscourts.cavc.gov) under "Employment" via the link titled "Court History Book Request for Proposals Q&A Summary."

Posted: August 24, 2015
Tagged: Calls for Papers, News of the Profession


Action Alert: Urge Congress to Restore Funding for K-12 History and Civics Education

Negotiations to finalize a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) will resume when Congress returns after Labor Day. Members of the House and Senate will be meeting to iron out the differences between the versions of the bill passed by each body. Quite simply, the Senate bill restores federal funding for K-12 history and civics education while the House bill does not.

The Senate version includes four provisions that create funding for high quality American history, civics, geography, and economics education. Some House Majority Conferees, however, have already declared their top priority in conference to be eliminating as many new programs and grants as possible. This poses a direct threat to the Senate provisions that could inject much needed funding into history, civics, and the social studies.

The Organization of American Historians and the National Coalition for History (NCH) urgently need you to contact your member of the House of Representatives. Congressmen Ross (R-FL) and Cicilline (D-RI) have drafted and distributed a sign-on letter urging their colleagues to adopt the history and civics provisions in the Senate's version of the bill. We need your help collecting as many signatures on this "Dear Colleague" letter as possible before September 11th so that this letter can have an important impact on the negotiations.

Please urge your representative to sign the "Dear Colleague" letter supporting key provisions that benefit history and civics education.

Send an email directly to House members!

Follow this link to NCH's website for more information.

We cannot overstress the importance of this effort. Congress has not reauthorized the ESEA in 15 years so this is likely our only opportunity to get funding restored for K-12 history and civics education. Time is of the essence, please act today!

Jon Butler
OAH President 2015-2016
Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of American Studies, History, and Religious Studies, Yale University
Adjunct Research Professor of History, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Katherine Finley
Executive Director
Organization of American Historians

Posted: August 21, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Organization, News of the Profession


Alice Smith Prize in Public History

The Midwestern History Association invites nominations for the Alice Smith Prize in Public History. Named after the director of research at the Wisconsin Historical Society from 1947 to 1965 who authored six books and numerous articles on the state's history, the prize honors a public history project completed in the previous calendar year (2014) that contributes to broader public reflection and appreciation of the region's past. For purposes of the award, "the Midwest" includes the twelve states of the region as defined by the US Census: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Projects by individuals, groups, community organizations, businesses, or other organizations or work done in support of such projects may be nominated. Projects may include, but are not limited to the following areas: Media, Exhibits, Public Programs or Written Works (such as research reports, brochures, working papers, or historical fiction) that broaden public history understanding. Non-fiction books and journal articles are not eligible for this award.

Nominations must include name and contact information of project participants along with appropriate materials documenting the project. For consideration, please submit nomination and materials to Aaron Shapiro, Chair, Smith Prize Committee at ashapi10@uncc.edu or via mail at Department of History, UNC Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223.

Deadline for submissions: 15 September 2015

Posted: July 16, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


Hamlin Garland Prize in Popular History

The Midwestern History Association invites nominations for the Hamlin Garland Prize in Popular History. The prize is named after the Midwestern writer Hamlin Garland, a product of Wisconsin, Iowa, and South Dakota who sought to promote writing about his home region and published widely in popular outlets. His many books include Daughter of the Middle Border, which won the Pultizer Prize in 1922. The Garland Prize honors a work of popular history about the Midwest published in the previous calendar year (2014) that contributes to broader public reflection and appreciation of the region's past. For purposes of the award, "the Midwest" includes the twelve states of the region as defined by the US Census: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Works of popular history eligible for the prize may include, but are not limited to, articles in popular history magazines and journals, feature stories in magazines and newspapers, and books written for a broad public audience.

Nominations must include the name and contact information of the nominated work's author and three copies of the work nominated. For consideration, please submit nomination and accompanying materials to Professor Kristin Mapel Bloomberg, Chair, Garland Prize Committee at kbloomberg@hamline.edu or via mail at Manor Hall 33B, PO Box 158, 1536 Hewitt Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota, 55104.

Deadline for submissions: 1 October 2015

Posted: July 16, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


Librarian of Congress to Retire

James H. Billington, the 13th Librarian of Congress, will retire on January 1, 2016. The former history professor and Rhodes Scholar was appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1987 to oversee the largest library in the world. Billington is credited with expanding the Library's public outreach, including a lead role in the creation of Thomas.gov legislative search engine and the National Book Festival. His 28-year legacy is not without its critics, however, many of which blame Billington for the institution's digital lag. Just this year, the nation's oldest cultural institution came under scrutiny for technology issues that put the Library at risk of a data breach. The new appointee will be nominated by President Obama and requires Senate confirmation.

Posted: July 10, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


The Smithsonian Welcomes New Secretary

Dr. David J. Skorton became the Smithsonian Institutions 13th Secretary in its 169-year history on July 1, 2015. Previously, Skorton served as president at Cornell University and Iowa University. His background and training is in cardiology, which he taught for twenty-six years. He is the first medical doctor to lead the Smithsonian.

In assuming his new position Skorton stated, "With its diverse collections and staff, the Smithsonian is uniquely positioned to lead a global dialogue on critical questions where the arts, humanities and sciences intersect. The Smithsonian can advance our understanding of the world around us through a distinctly American perspective." http://newsdesk.si.edu/releases/smithsonian-welcomes-secretary-david-skorton

Posted: July 10, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


OAH Executive Committee Issues Statement on Tenure, Academic Freedom, and Shared Governance—and the University of Wisconsin System

The Executive Committee of the Organization of American Historians strongly supports the statement on academic freedom and tenure issued by more than twenty of our fellow scholarly organizations. The academic freedom secured through tenure and a partnership between faculty and administration in governing standards is a linchpin of intellectual inquiry in American higher education. Together, tenure and shared university governance stand at the heart of advanced research and vigorous teaching, as has been recognized explicitly in Wisconsin since its Board of Regents' report of 1894.

The OAH Executive Committee shares the grave concerns voiced by our fellow scholarly associations that the proposed changes to the University of Wisconsin tenure system will irreparably damage protections for free inquiry in one of the nation's most distinguished public universities, undermining its model achievements in research, scholarship, and teaching. A threat to the continuation of tenure at the University of Wisconsin threatens the vitality of all higher education in the United States, for erosion of academic freedom anywhere threatens free inquiry as a principle and practice everywhere.

The statement from the twenty scholarly associations supported by the OAH Executive Committee can be found here.

Update: The OAH has recieved several letters thanking the Organization for our support.

Posted: July 10, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession


OAH LGBTQ Committee Issues Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Decision in Obergefell v. Hodges

The Organization of American (OAH) Historians Committee on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Historians and Histories celebrates the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges, declaring same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states and making marriage equality a reality. The decision's grounding in historical scholarship and its citation of amicus briefs written and signed by historians, including OAH president-elect Nancy Cott, George Chauncey, and many other OAH members, testifies to the transformative power of writing and teaching history. We hope that this historic decision quickens the momentum toward justice for all people across lines of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, disability, religion, and nationality.

Regina Kunzel, Chair (Princeton University)
Marc Stein (San Francisco State University)
Anne E. Parsons (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)
Leila Rupp (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Nicholas Syrett (University of Northern Colorado)
Karen Halttunen, Executive Board Liaison (University of Southern California)

Posted: June 29, 2015
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Organization, News of the Profession


U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Same-Sex Marriage

In a historic civil rights ruling issued today in Obergefell v. Hodges, the U.S. Supreme Court made marriage a right available to all Americans, regardless of sexual orientation. The OAH Executive Board submitted an amicus curiae brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in support of the petitioners written by historian and OAH member George Chauncey on the history of discrimination against gay men and lesbians in America. This brief was cited specifically by Justice Anthony Kennedy in his majority opinion in today's decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, as was the historical scholarship of OAH president-elect Nancy Cott and other prominent American historians.

Read the OAH LGBTQ Committee statement here.

Read the Supreme Court decision here.

Read the amicus curiae brief here.

Posted: June 26, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Advocacy


OAH Members Honored as Pulitzer Prize Winner and Finalist


OAH member Elizabeth A. Fenn, an associate professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, has received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in history for her work, Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People (2014). Fenn's study explores the history of the Mandans, a Native American tribe in the Dakotas. She holds the Walter S. and Lucienne Driskill Chair in Western American History. Fenn is also the coauthor, with Peter H. Wood, of Natives and Newcomers: The Way We Lived in North Carolina before 1770 (1983) and the author of the award-winning Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 (2001).

Sven Beckert, also an OAH member, was nominated as a Pulitzer Prize finalist for Empire of Cotton: A Global History (2014), which argues that slavery was crucial to the dynamism of the industrial revolution. He is the Laird Bell Professor of History at Harvard University.

Please join us in congratulating OAH members Fenn and Beckert on their accomplishments!

Posted: May 1, 2015
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Clio's Kudos


Spaces Still Open for 2015 Oral History Institute

Volunteers or staff from local history organizations, libraries, schools, and colleges, those working in corporate history, park services, medicine/research, and tourism all benefit from attending the Oral History Institute. The Institute is June 2 - 4 at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. The program trains participants in planning and conducting successful oral history projects.

Emphasizing hands-on experience, topics covered in the three-day schedule include interviewing techniques, transcribing and archiving, and devising public programs based on oral history. To develop these skills, participants will work on a practice project that encompasses all stages of oral history. Additional sessions cover using technology in oral history, fundraising, and civic tourism.

The Institute faculty includes professors of History, Sociology, Archiving, and Journalism, each representing extensive experience conducting oral history projects. The Institute schedule provides ample time for students to consult with these experts.

Admission to the Oral History Institute is competitive and limited to thirty persons. Tuition of $400 covers lodging for two nights, six meals, and workshop materials. For additional information, contact James Calder at (800) 293-9774 or jimc@ohiohumanities.org.

The Oral History Institute is co-sponsored by the Ohio Humanities Council and The Rural Life Center at Kenyon College. The Ohio Humanities Council is the state-based partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities – helping Ohioans share the human story.

Posted: May 1, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New “Humanities in the Public Square” Grants

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced a new grant opportunity, called "Humanities in the Public Square," that will put humanities scholars in direct dialogue with the public on some of the most pressing issues of today— through public forums, community programs, and the development of educational resources.
This new grant opportunity is part of the National Endowment for the Humanities' agency-wide initiative The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.
"Throughout its 50-year history the National Endowment for the Humanities has striven to meet the challenge laid out in the agency's enabling legislation, which speaks eloquently of the need to attend to 'the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life,'" said NEH Chairman William Adams. "This new grant program seeks to fulfill that mission in a very concrete way by bringing together scholars and their wider communities to examine how the humanities help us understand the challenging concerns of our time—from the implications of new technologies for public and private life to the modern experience of war and military service."
The NEH Humanities in the Public Square program will award grants of up to $300,000 to institutions for projects that incorporate:

Application guidelines and a list of FAQs for the Humanities in the Public Square program are available at www.neh.gov. The application deadline for the initial cycle of Humanities in the Public Square grants is June 24, 2015.
Applications requesting $150,000 or more should aim to implement ambitious projects with a broad geographic reach and the potential to engage large audiences through extensive collaboration or a larger number of venues. NEH strongly encourages smaller projects focused on local communities and smaller audiences.
Through NEH's Standing Together initiative, which emphasizes the innovative ways in which the humanities can foster engagement with military veterans and their communities, Humanities in the Public Square grants offer resources for work with veterans while also inviting organizations to consider the importance of the humanities for addressing other significant challenges.

Posted: May 1, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New “Common Heritage” Grant Program

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced a new grant program, called "Common Heritage," that will bring to light historical records and artifacts currently hidden in family attics and basements across the country and make them digitally available to the wider public and for posterity.


NEH invites historical societies, libraries, archives, museums, colleges and other local institutions to apply for the Common Heritage grant program, the first federal grant program of its kind. Grants will support day-long events, organized by community cultural institutions, in which members of the public will be invited to share materials important to their family or community histories, such as photographs, artifacts, family letters, and works of art.


These items will be digitized, along with descriptive information and context provided by the community attendees. With the owner's permission, the digitized materials will be made publicly available through the institution's online collections. Contributors will receive a free digital copy of their items to take home, along with the original materials.
These materials will also be used for public programming – including lectures, exhibits, discussion programs, and film screenings – that celebrates and expands knowledge of the community's past and the diverse histories of its members.


"We know that America's cultural heritage isn't found only in libraries and museums," said NEH Chairman William Adams, "but in our homes, in our family histories, and the stories and objects we pass down to our children. NEH's new Common Heritage grant program aims to capture this vitally important part of our country's heritage and preserve it for future generations."
Application guidelines and a list of FAQs for the Common Heritage program are available at www.neh.gov. The application deadline for the initial cycle of Common Heritage grants is June 25, 2015. The first round of Common Heritage digitization days is expected to take place in early 2016.


The new Common Heritage grant program is part of the National Endowment for the Humanities' agency-wide initiative The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.


NEH's Common Heritage program will award grants of up to $12,000 to community cultural organizations to coordinate community events and ensure that a wide range of historical materials can be digitized and contextualized through public programming.


NEH program staff from the Divisions of Preservation & Accessand Public Programs will conduct a webinar for interested applicants on Tuesday, May 5 at 4 PM (EST).

NEH Common Heritage grants webinar information:
May 5, 4-4:30 PM (EST)
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/232247517
Access code: 232-247-517
You can also dial in by phone at: (872) 240-3312

Posted: May 1, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession


Fulbright Scholar Program Opportunities

This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 60 awards in the field of American History. Exciting opportunities are available in many countries including but not limited to:

For further awards in the field of American Studies, American History, and American Literature, please visit Opportunities in American Studies, where you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the discipline.

For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: http://cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-program. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join our online community, My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens, and the current competition will close on August 3, 2015.

Posted: May 1, 2015
Tagged: News of the Profession, Awards and Prizes