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News in American History

New Badge Possibilities at the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting

With the well-meaning intent of creating networking opportunities, academic conferences ask that all attendees wear a name badge prominently displayed on their person. To further help attendees navigate the many faces and names, they also traditionally ask for each person's affiliation. The OAH Annual Meeting has been no exception.

The blog post 'Hey Academics, Please Stop Calling Me an "Independent Scholar"' by Megan Kate Nelson recently prompted an important conversation about the way in which we label ourselves, and thereby each other.  Conference attendees increasingly identify themselves as more than their affiliation, and those without a current affiliation increasingly feel on the outskirts of an ever-shrinking group.

We encourage all attendees to reconsider what they list on their badge during the registration process. We invite you to list your specialty, twitter handle, or, if you prefer, your affiliation. We want all our attendees to feel comfortable and to use the information on the badges of their peers to help build relationships and make new connections.

Join the conversation at OAH Crossroads or tweet us using #OAH18.
Register and update your badge here!

 

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Posted: October 10, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Jacob Dorn

The Department of History is saddened to share that Dr. Jacob H. Dorn, professor emeritus, passed away Tuesday morning after suffering a heart attack over the weekend. He was 77 years old. Jake retired in June 2012, after an extraordinary career of 47 years of teaching, scholarship, and service at Wright State and in the wider community.   

 

Jake was among the founding faculty of the University. He obtained his PhD. from the University of Oregon at the remarkably young age of 25. Shortly thereafter, he began teaching at what was then the Dayton campus of Ohio State and Miami Universities in 1965. He joined the faculty full time when the university became independent, and rose to the rank of full Professor by 1974. He taught American history, and specialized in social, intellectual and religious history, particularly in the Progressive Era. In 1972 he founded, and was the director for the next fifteen years, of the university's Honors Program. He oversaw countless senior and Master's theses. Generations of students considered him an outstanding teacher and mentor.

 

He was also an accomplished scholar. Jake was the author of Washington Gladden: Prophet of the Social Gospel (Ohio State University, 1967), just reprinted in paperback. He and his colleagues Carl M. Becker and Paul G. Merriam compiled A Bibliography of Sources for Dayton, Ohio, 1850-1950 (1971), funded by the National Science Foundation . He was the editor of a collection of essays, Socialism and Christianity in early 20th Century America (Greenwood Press, 1998). He was also the author of numerous articles, contributions and book reviews in a variety of scholarly journals and edited collections.

 

Jake believed strongly in selfless service to the university, the profession, and the wider community. He was deeply involved with the Ohio Academy of History, serving two terms as president and on virtually every committee. He was particularly active in the Dayton Council on World Affairs (DCOWA), served as a first reader with the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and was involved with the National Council on U.S./Arab Relations. He served on the board of the American Baptist Historical Society, with the Ohio Board for United Ministries in Higher Education, and with many, many other organizations. He gave of his time freely for innumerable presentations to community groups large and small. 

 

As one former colleague remembered, "I admired and appreciated Jake for his dignity, depth of scholarship, wisdom, and compassionate concern for people." As another stated, "Jake Dorn was the department." He will be missed by the faculty with whom he worked and the generations of students whom he taught. A memorial service in his memory will be held on Saturday, September 9, 2017 at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 125 N. Wilkinson St, Dayton, OH 45402 at 11:00 AM. A reception will follow. 

 

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that contributions be made to the Jacob H. Dorn Scholarship Fund. Checks made out to the Wright State University Foundation may be sent to the attention of Sara Woodhull, Wright State University Foundation, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton OH 45435 with a notation that they should be directed to the Dorn fund.

 

Jonathan Reed Winkler

Professor & Chair

Department of History

  

 

Posted: September 28, 2017
Tagged: In Memoriam


National Humanities Alliance Update

Thank you to all OAH members who wrote or called their members of congress to voice their concern about proposed cuts to the NEH earlier this year. The National Humanities Alliance (NHA), of which OAH is part, has prepared a report detailing their efforts and those to come. To read NHA Executive Director Steven Kidd's entire report, click here.

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Posted: September 28, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Profession


Ronald Schaffer

Ronald Schaffer, Professor of History Emeritus at California State University, Northridge, passed away on September 1 at age eighty-five. A Princeton Ph.D. and a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, he taught at Northridge from 1965 to 1999. His most important scholarly works were Wings of Judgment: American Bombing in World War II (1985) and America in the Great War: The Rise of the War Welfare State (1991), both published by Oxford University Press. His articles appeared in prominent scholarly journals, and he consulted extensively for public television. In recent years, he had been at work on a book about American aviators during World War I.

Posted: September 14, 2017
Tagged: In Memoriam


Hurricane Harvey

Many OAH members live and work in the areas affected by Hurricane Harvey this past week. The scope of devastation in the region is immense. There are many avenues to help the victims. National Public Radio has compiled a list of organizations, both local and national, who are taking donations.

Our thoughts go out to our members and all those in the region. We welcome all suggestions on how the OAH can best assist the history community in the region.

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Posted: September 1, 2017
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession


OAH Endorses AHA Statement on Confederate Monuments

The OAH Executive Committee has endorsed the AHA Statement on Confederate Monuments. We would especially like to emphasize that:

  • "To remove a monument, or to change the name of a school or street, is not to erase history, but rather to alter or call attention to a previous interpretation of history," and 

  • "To remove such monuments is neither to 'change' history nor 'erase' it.  What changes with such removals is what American communities decide is worthy of civic honor."

We are grateful for the many OAH members who have spoken on this issue.

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Posted: August 31, 2017
Tagged: Advocacy, News of the Organization, News of the Profession


International Residencies 2018

Germany (Deadline: October 2, 2017)
http://www.oah.org/programs/residencies/germany/
Thanks to a generous grant from the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the OAH International Committee is pleased to announce the continuation of the Residency Program in American History—Germany (Germany Residency Program) at the University of Tübingen.

Japan (Deadline: October 2, 2017)
http://www.oah.org/programs/residencies/japan/
In cooperation with and support from the Japan-United States Friendship Commission, the OAH and the Japanese Association for American Studies (JAAS) plan to send two American scholars to Japanese universities for two-week residencies in the summer of 2018, pending funding.

China (Deadline: October 16, 2017)
http://www.oah.org/programs/residencies/china/
Thanks to a generous grant from the Ford Foundation, the Organization of American Historians and the American History Research Association of China (AHRAC) are pleased to announce the fifth year of the exchange program between the two organizations. 

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Posted: August 3, 2017
Tagged: None


The Organization of American Historians Launches New Media Resource

The Organization of American Historians (OAH) is pleased to announce a new resource for members of the media. With over 7,000 member historians, the OAH can connect you with subject matter experts on topics ranging from the Electoral College, executive orders, U.S.-Russian relations, and everything in between. In these contentious times, understanding our nation’s history is of critical importance.

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Posted: July 27, 2017
Tagged: News of the Organization, News of the Profession, Advocacy


Symposium on Cryptologic History - Registration Now Open

Registration is now open for "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum," the 2017 Symposium on Cryptologic History. The Symposium will take place October 19 - 20, 2017 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Center in Laurel, Maryland. Following the Symposium, on Saturday, October 21, participants will be given an opportunity to tour the National Cryptologic Museum, participate in a workshop on sources for research in cryptologic history, and enjoy presentations about William and Elizebeth Friedman

Agenda highlights include sessions on Cyber Conflict, Cold War cryptology, and mulitiple sessions on World War 2. There will be a World War 1 track on October 20th which will include a performance of the one-woman show "The Hello Girls" by Ellouise Schoettler. Other sessions of note include "Writing about Cryptology & Intelligence" (featuring Steven Aftergood, Mark Bradley, Stephen Budiansky, and Michael V. Hayden); "Breaking Engima: The Anglo-French-Polish Effort" (the panel includes Sir Dermot Turing); "Writing the History of GCHQ;" "Vietnam Re-examined;" and "Pencil-Pushing Mammas: Women in Cryptology" which will feature both oral histories as well as talks by four authors of books about female cryptologists (G. Stuart Smith, Jason Fagone, Jackie Uí Chionna, and Liza Mundy).

Please join us! Complete information and registration links can be found at http://bit.ly/OCT2017CCH; the preliminary program can be found here: https://cryptologicfoundation.org/file_download/f539ed6b-cedd-4d0a-bd64-1c858fe4bbee

Posted: July 18, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Announcing OAH Crossroads - an online community for U.S. historians

The OAH Annual Meeting Crossroads, in partnership with H-net, is an online forum where U.S. historians can collaborate to form panels for upcoming Annual Meetings, connect ahead of the conference to find room or travel mates, or converse about the profession.

As opposed to a traditional H-net network, Crossroads posts OAH related conversations from other H-net area specific networks on one page. So, if you are searching for collaborators in H-AfroAm then, by using certain keywords, it will show up in OAH Crossroads making it easier for potential Annual Meeting participants to find.

View OAH Crossroads

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Posted: July 12, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, News of the Organization


Society for Applied Anthropology

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 78th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, PA, April 3-7, 2018. The theme of the Program is “Sustainable Futures.”

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2017. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual- meeting/).

If you have a webpage for links, please add the following:

The Society for Applied Anthropology is pleased to announce our 78th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, PA, April 3-7, 2018.  For meeting information visit www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/.

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Trish Colvin
Society for Applied Anthropology
PO Box 2436
Oklahoma City, OK 73101
405-843-5113
405-843-8553 (fax)
info@sfaa.net

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Women and Religion in the Early Americas

For a special issue in honor of the life and career of Mary Maples Dunn, Early American Studies seeks article-length contributions from scholars working on the history of women and religion in the early Americas. Mary Maples Dunn (1931-2017) was a leading practitioner of women’s history, as a scholar, as a teacher, and in her life as a university leader. She worked in a variety of fields from early American women’s history; to colonial Latin American history; to the history of religious women; to the history of women’s education as well as, of course, the worlds of William Penn and early Philadelphia. 

The editors invite essays that consider the history of early American women, early American religion (or both) and are especially interested in work that makes cross-cultural comparisons or integrates multiple Atlantic orientations: North and South (French, British, Dutch, Spanish and/or Portuguese) East and West (from European and/or African links to Native American perspectives). We are interested in both formal article-length contributions (10,000 words) and in shorter essays on "Notes and Documents" that highlight innovative or creative ways of reading/using primary-source documents (3,000-5,000 words). 

To submit, please email a 3-page CV and a 1,000 word summary of the contribution you propose to write by September 30 to Ann Little (ann.little@colostate.edu) and Nicole Eustace (nicole.eustace@nyu.edu). Please use the subject line "Mary Maples Dunn Special Issue Submission." We will notify you of your preliminary acceptance by October 31, 2017 and final essays are due on April 30, 2018. Articles are to be published, subject to peer review, in 2019.

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The Poetics and Politics of ‘Anonymous’ Contemporary Craft

Is anonymity in conditions of artisanal production counterintuitive to our understanding of contemporary craft? The great majority of recent exhibitions and publications about modern and contemporary craft cite artistry that has a known provenance, mainly comprised of identified individual authors. Is the monographic study of individual genius, a convention established by Vasari in the Renaissance, still helpful or a hindrance, and does that model serve the meanings of pottery, weaving, or cast metals, where workshops of dozens (or hundreds) are the longer historical tradition? If one of the strengths of craft history has been an expansive view beyond the traditional art historical canon and an inclusion of women’s work and indigenous making, a recurring weakness has been its paternalistic attitudes towards marginalized and underrepresented cultures. For instance, a craft museum recently exhibited 20th-century metalwork as “anonymous African jewelry,” a shorthan d that normatizes three problematic terms in one fell swoop. This session seeks papers on anonymous artisans which go beyond the insider/outsider duality and which strive for taxonomies with more nuance than ‘folk,’ and especially welcomes field work that strays into complex manufacturing or collective production as well as case studies that “look at what the practitioners do” (Geertz, 1973).

For More Information: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Archie K. Davis Fellowships, 2017-2018

The North Caroliniana Society has announced the granting of an Archie K. Davis Fellowship to each of the following scholars for 2017-2018: Richard Berman, Oxford Brookes University; John Brannon, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities; Robert Colby, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Sara Collini, George Mason University; Michael Hardy, Independent Historian; Nathaniel Holly, College of William & Mary; Tina Irvine, University of Pennsylvania; Stefanie King, University of Kentucky; Michael Lynch, University of Tennessee; Joshua Shiver, Auburn University; Lewis Stern, Independent Historian; Rodney Steward, University of South Carolina Salkehatchie; Larry Tise, East Carolina University; and Brandon Winford, University of Tennessee.

Archie K. Davis Fellowships assist scholars in their travel to sources of North Carolina history. The annual deadline for proposals is March 1. For information, visit www.ncsociety.org.

Posted: July 6, 2017
Tagged: Fellowships


America in Class Webinar Series

The National Humanities Center is proud to launch the 2017-2018 America in Class webinar series with an exclusive streaming event of Teacher of the Year, a new documentary that offers a poignant look at the teaching profession through the eyes of North Carolina high school social studies teacher Angie Scoli.

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Posted: June 27, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession


Mary Nickliss

Mary Nickliss, a devoted and loving wife and mother, passed away on May 18, 2017. The OAH Mary Nickliss Prize in U.S. Women's and/or Gender History was created and funded in her honor by her daughter, OAH member Alexandra Nickliss. The prize acknowledges the generations of women whose opportunities were limited by the historical circumstances in which they lived. Mary Nickliss was grateful for the honor the prize bestowed upon her while she was alive. She was the child of Serbian immigrants and a native of Pennsylvania who lived most of her life in California. She was brilliant, methodical, resilient, and strong. Part of a generation that survived the Great Depression, she was an avid supporter of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

Posted: June 27, 2017
Tagged: In Memoriam


Action Alert--Oppose Budget Cuts to Vital History Programs

On May 23, President Trump sent his proposed fiscal year (FY) 2018 budget request to Congress. As expected, it included devastating cuts to federal history and humanities funding including elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and Title VI/Fulbright-Hays international education programs at the U.S. Department of Education.

House Appropriations Committee subcommittees will be drafting their spending bills between now and the end of June. It is critical that you contact your members of Congress in support of these vital federal programs. 

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Posted: June 16, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession, Advocacy


TREC Short-term Travel Awards at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History

To encourage use of its equity-related collections, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History offers 4 short-term travel awards for researchers to come to the Museum and use the Archives Center's 20,000 feet of archival materials. Each recipient is awarded a lump sum of $1,500 to support 10 days of research in residence.

The TREC (Travel Research in Equity Collections) award is intended for research in NMAH collections related to one or more of the following: disability; gender; LGBTQ and sexuality; and race and ethnicity. Researchers may be at any level or rank, from any institution as well as independent scholars, writers, journalists, artists, or film-makers.

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Posted: June 16, 2017
Tagged: News of the Profession, Awards and Prizes


International Conference on the Blues

4th Annual International Conference on the Blues 
Deadline: July 10, 2017
Conference dates: October 1-3, 2017
www.deltastate.edu/blues
Delta State University, Cleveland, Mississippi

Delta State University is now accepting proposals for papers, presentations, lecture-performances, workshops, panels, and clinics for the 4th annual International Conference on the Blues. 

To celebrate the centennial of John Lee Hooker's birth, we are soliciting manuscripts and presentations on Mr. Hooker's music, life, and influence. In addition, we are interested in presentations and papers on the legacy of ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax, and especially his fieldwork in Mississippi.

Furthermore, topics of general interest to scholars and enthusiasts are also welcome, such as the African American musical tradition and its influence on world music; call and response as metaphor; black music and the American Civil Rights Movement; African American history in the Delta; African American folk life; and the genres of blues, jazz, gospel, and soul music. Topics of an interdisciplinary nature are also encouraged. Papers are invited from ethnomusicologists, musicologists, scholars, authors, performers, blues enthusiasts, and independent researchers.

Additionally, to support young and emerging scholars (graduate students, recent masters and doctoral graduates, and junior faculty), the Luther Brown Prize is awarded to the outstanding young scholar paper.

All presentations will be a maximum of 20 minutes in length, with an additional ten minutes for discussion, and should address a general audience. Proposals must be submitted online via www.deltastate.edu/blues. Please include a description of the presentation, audio/visual equipment needs, and biographical information for all presenters. Please note that not all A/V requests will be granted. Presenters agree to appear at the conference at their own expense, which will include registration fees. 

The conference falls in between the Mighty Mississippi Music Festival in Greenville, Mississippi and the King Biscuit Blues Festival in Helena, Arkansas.

For more information, please contact Shelley Collins and Don Allan Mitchell at blues at deltastate.edu.

For More Information: http://www.internationaldeltabluesproject.com/conference/

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


2017 Lucerne Master Class for PhD Students

HISTORIES OF GLOBAL CAPITALISM" - with Prof. Dr. Sven Beckert (Harvard University)

APPLICATION DEADLINE
15th June 2017

THE SCHOLAR
Sven Beckert is Laird Bell Professor of History in the Department of History as well as co-chair of the Program on the Study of Capitalism at Harvard University. His main focus lies on the history of the United States in the nineteenth Century, with a particular emphasis on the history of capitalism, including its economic, social, political and transnational dimensions. The combined examination of these dimensions is also at the heart of the monograph he is best known for: Empire of Cotton: A Global History (2014). Other pertinent publications include Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development (2016), and The American Bourgeoisie: Distinction and Identity in the Nineteenth Century (2010).

THE TOPIC
During the past few years, few topics have animated the chattering classes more than capitalism. In the wake of the global economic crisis, questions about the nature, past and viability of capitalism suddenly appeared on evening talk shows and in newspapers throughout the world, crossing most political boundaries. Partly in response to the contemporary debates, historians, ever attuned to the world in which they live, have rediscovered the study of the history of capitalism. In their work, they have insisted on the long-term trajectory of capitalism, have emphasized the great variety of capitalism both over time and in space, have focused on capitalism’s global connections, and, perhaps most insistently, have emphasized the political, social and cultural embeddedness of economic change. Their work has created a powerful challenge to some of the naturalizing tenets that are frequently found in the discipline of economics.

In this Lucerne Master Class we will explore some of these discussions, and try to come to terms with what this new history of capitalism is all about. Students’ own work will be crucial to our discussions, as are prominent texts from within what has become one of the most dynamic fields in modern historical research.

PARTICIPANTS
The Master Class addresses doctoral students from disciplines such as History, Philosophy, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Political Science, Social Anthropology, Economics and Global Studies. Applications from international and EU doctoral students as well as doctoral students from Switzerland are welcome.

COSTS
Tuition fee: 350 CHF

The organizing body of the Master Class, the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences (GSL) at the University of Lucerne, will cover catering and accommodation expenses. We will try to cover travel expenses as well, however, this depends on the country of origin. For details please send an email to the us (contact Email at the end of the page). If applicants can muster support from their respective home institution, this is welcome.

APPLICATION
Please provide a short statement of motivation (no more than one page), a CV and a short description (no more than one page) of your current dissertation project. Postdocs may be admitted on the basis of individual decision.

WHAT FORMER PARTICIPANTS SAY
“The Lucerne Master Class is a unique experience for PhD students. It has helped me a lot both in terms of motivation and content of my dissertation. I would definitely do it again.” (Daniel Bader, Heidelberg University)

“The Master Class was a one-time opportunity to discuss the work of an outstanding scholar and to get to know other PhD students working on related issues.” (Sebastian Möller, University of Bremen)

“I believe that spending this week with the Master will have an impact on the rest of my academic career.” (Sandra Engelbrecht, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin)
Programm

The class will begin on the 9th of October at 1.00 pm and end on the 13th of October at 1.00 pm.
The daily schedule will be from 9.00 am - 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm - 6.00 pm and on one evening (lecture & dinner) from 6.00 - 9.00 pm. There will be an afternoon for recreation in the Lucerne area. Participants will discuss Sven Beckert’s recent work but also present and discuss their own projects.

CONTACT
christina.cavedon@unilu.ch

For More Information: http://www.unilu.ch/masterclass

Posted: June 1, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers