Opportunities for Historians

Calls for Papers

The Society of Georgia Archivists Annual Meeting Program Committee proudly presents the theme for the 2022 annual meeting: Sustaining Archives: Practical Solutions for the Future.

DEADLINE: May 28, 2022

The Committee invites you to attend the meeting, to be held at the Jekyll Island Club, October 26–28, 2022.

Our 2022 hybrid program will focus on creating and sustaining practical tools, partnerships, and healthy work environments. Presentations will examine how archivists build practical approaches to workflows, teaching, collaborations, staffing, and healthy environments. The Program Committee seeks session proposals that highlight innovative research, applied projects, and collective insights that improve our understanding of archival work. While proposals on all aspects of archival practice and research will be considered, the Program Committee is especially interested in the following key topics:

  • Creating and implementing practical workflows, methods, and tools

  • Building sustainable staffing models and fostering healthy work environments

  • Developing and sustaining DEI initiatives in our institutions and the archival profession

  • Engaging with underrepresented communities and/or historically marginalized groups

  • Teaching and learning with archival materials in innovative ways

  • Dismantling silos and building collaborative partnerships internally and externally

  • Exploring environmental sustainability, disaster response, and the effects of climate change

The committee welcomes proposals from anyone involved with archives, including archival staff and volunteers, students, new professionals, community organizers, researchers, and allied professionals. We encourage potential presenters to consider how their proposed session will support the SGA Statement on Diversity and Inclusion.

Proposals can be submitted through the online submission form.

The deadline for proposal submissions is May 27, 2021.

Posted: April 6, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Association for the Study of African American Life and History Annual Meeting

DEADLINE: June 16, 2022

Join ASALH for the 107th Annual Meeting & Conference
September 29 – October 1, 2022
Montgomery, AL

The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the various ways health and wellness can be described, including, but not limited, to medical health, mental health, nutrition, body positivity, financial wellness, creative arts, and physical activity. Additionally, it is important to note the intersection between financial wellness and medical and mental wellbeing.

In the Black community it is important to honor the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g. birth workers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. The 2022 theme considers activities, rituals and initiatives that Black communities have done to be well.

To foster good health and wellness Black people have embarked on self-determination, mutual aid and social support initiatives to build hospitals, medical and nursing schools (i.e. Meharry Medical College, Howard University College of Medicine, Provident Hospital and Training School, Morehouse School of Medicine, etc.) and community clinics. Clinics were established by individuals, grassroots organizations, and mutual aid societies, such as the African Union Society, National Association of Colored Women and Black Panther Party, to provide spaces for Black people to counter the economic and health disparities and discrimination that are found at mainstream institutions. While Black communities were creating hospitals, community health clinics, and medical colleges, they were also creating Black owned insurance companies and burial societies, financial institutions, credit unions, and businesses in efforts to empower their communities to be financially stable and well; and to keep the money in the community. These institutions worked to develop Black business districts and to improve the socioeconomic status of the Black community.

At this point in the 21st century, our understanding of Black health and wellness is broader and more nuanced than ever. Black health and wellness not only include one’s physical body, but also emotional and mental health. In the still overhanging shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, Black people should and do use data and other information-sharing modalities to document, decry, and agitate against the interconnected, intersecting inequalities intentionally baked into systems and structures in the U.S. for no other reason than to curtail, circumscribe, and destroy Black well-being in all forms and Black lives. It was also during the pandemic that a light was shone on the glaring disparities in the insurance and pharmaceutical industries as well as the impact the lack of a living wage had on the health and wellness of those in the Black community. It became clear that individuals, organizations, and businesses were financially unwell and unable to handle a financial crisis. Some of these issues arose from bad financial decisions (i.e. debt, bad investments, lack of savings, the housing crisis, etc.) and denote the need for financial literacy and planning for future financial wellness.

Mindful of Sister Audre Lorde’s words, we are doing more to move forward holistically for the betterment of ourselves, our bodies, our relationships, our communities, and our planet.

We are determined to create a conference that shines a light on the multiple facets of Black health and wellness through education and activism.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s Academic Program Committee seeks proposals that probe the traditional fields of economics, accounting, politics, medicine, psychology, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LGBTQIA, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; literature; and the social sciences. We look forward to proposals that center Black/African Diasporic health from multiple ontologies and epistemologies, embrace decoloniality, and engage embodiment. We encourage submissions from historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, information professionals, activists, financial planners, accountants, clinicians, community healers, health researchers, and health practitioners.

Proposal Types
Proposals should be detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive that outline the theme, scope, and aim of session. Details on each can be found on the ASALH website.

Papers: There will be limited slots for paper sessions at the ASALH annual meeting. Papers will ONLY be accepted by non-academics, undergraduate, and graduate students on the 2022 Annual Black History Theme: Black Health and Wellness. For those who do not fit into these categories the Academic Program Committee encourages you to use the Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Panels, Workshops, Roundtables, Media, Woodson Pop-Ups, and Posters: Proposals that incorporate the annual theme are preferred, but submissions can be on a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life, and culture. Proposals will be accepted by all affiliations and academic status. For individuals who are interested in collaborating on a panel, workshop, roundtable please use the Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

The All-Academic system will be open in January 2022. The submission deadlines for proposals are as follows: Early Bird Submissions will be accepted via All Academic until March 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Conditional acceptance responses to Early Bird submissions will be sent out by April 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). After this date, the committee will accept all submissions until the deadline of April 30, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Regular conditional acceptances submissions will be responded to by June 15, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). You will not be considered official until all session participants have joined the Association and registered for the conference.

Learn more about the ASALH Call for Papers

Posted: March 7, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


CFP: ASALH 2022 Annual Meeting and Conference – Black Health and Wellness

DEADLINE: June 17, 2022

Call for Papers
107th Annual Meeting and Conference
2022 Black History Theme – Black Health and Wellness
September 29, 2022 – October 1, 2022
Montgomery, Alabama

DEADLINE: April 30, 2022

The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the various ways health and wellness can be described, including, but not limited, to medical health, mental health, nutrition, body positivity, financial wellness, creative arts, and physical activity. Additionally, it is important to note the intersection between financial wellness and medical and mental wellbeing.

In the Black community it is important to honor the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g. birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. The 2022 theme considers activities, rituals and initiatives that Black communities have done to be well.

To foster good health and wellness Black people have embarked on self-determination, mutual aid and social support initiatives to build hospitals, medical and nursing schools (i.e. Meharry Medical College, Howard University College of Medicine, Provident Hospital and Training School, Morehouse School of Medicine, etc.) and community clinics. Clinics were established by individuals, grassroots organizations, and mutual aid societies, such as the African Union Society, National Association of Colored Women and Black Panther Party, to provide spaces for Black people to counter the economic and health disparities and discrimination that are found at mainstream institutions. While Black communities were creating hospitals, community health clinics, and medical colleges, they were also creating Black owned insurance companies and burial societies, financial institutions, credit unions, and businesses in efforts to empower their communities to be financially stable and well; and to keep the money in the community. These institutions worked to develop Black business districts and to improve the socioeconomic status of the Black community.

At this point in the 21st century, our understanding of Black health and wellness is broader and more nuanced than ever. Black health and wellness not only include one’s physical body, but also emotional and mental health. In the still overhanging shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, Black people should and do use data and other information-sharing modalities to document, decry, and agitate against the interconnected, intersecting inequalities intentionally baked into systems and structures in the U.S. for no other reason than to curtail, circumscribe, and destroy Black well-being in all forms and Black lives. It was also during the pandemic that a light was shone on the glaring disparities in the insurance and pharmaceutical industries as well as the impact the lack of a living wage had on the health and wellness of those in the Black community. It became clear that individuals, organizations, and businesses were financially unwell and unable to handle a financial crisis. Some of these issues arose from bad financial decisions (i.e. debt, bad investments, lack of savings, the housing crisis, etc.) and denote the need for financial literacy and planning for future financial wellness.

Mindful of Sister Audre Lorde’s words, we are doing more to move forward holistically for the betterment of ourselves, our bodies, our relationships, our communities, and our planet.

We are determined to create a conference that shines a light on the multiple facets of Black health and wellness through education and activism.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s Academic Program Committee seeks proposals that probe the traditional fields of economics, accounting, politics, medicine, psychology, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LGBTQIA, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; literature; and the social sciences. We look forward to proposals that center Black/African Diasporic health from multiple ontologies and epistemologies, embrace decoloniality, and engage embodiment. We encourage submissions from historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, information professionals, activists, financial planners, accountants, clinicians, community healers, health researchers, and health practitioners.

Proposal Types
Proposals should be detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive that outline the theme, scope, and aim of session. Details on each can be found on the ASALH website.

Papers: There will be limited slots for paper sessions at the ASALH annual meeting. Papers will ONLY be accepted by non-academics, undergraduate, and graduate students on the 2022 Annual Black History Theme: Black Health and Wellness. For those who do not fit into these categories the Academic Program Committee encourages you to use the Academic Program Committee Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Panels, Workshops, Roundtables, Media, Woodson Pop-Ups, and Posters: Proposals that incorporate the annual theme are preferred, but submissions can be on a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life and culture. Proposals will be accepted by all affiliations and academic status. For individuals who are interested in collaborating on a panel, workshop, roundtable please use the Academic Program Committee Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Submission
All proposals should be submitted via the All Academic system

The submission deadlines for proposals are as follows: Early Bird Submissions will be accepted via All Academic until March 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Conditional acceptance responses to Early Bird submissions will be sent out by April 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). After this date, the committee will accept all submissions until the deadline of April 30, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Regular conditional acceptances submissions will be responded to by June 15, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). You will not be considered official until all session participants have joined the Association and registered for the conference.

Academic Program Committee Leadership
Arwin Smallwood, Chair
Darius Young, Vice Chair

Read More

Posted: April 21, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


CFP: Material Matters: It's in the Details Virtual Conference

DEADLINE: July 2, 2022

Call for Papers
Material Matters: It’s in the Details
Fort Ticonderoga’s Center for Digital History
January 21, 2023

Material Culture provides a unique way to engage with topics and individuals for which no written sources survive, providing an entry into lives and experiences otherwise lost to history.

This is especially important from a military point of view. Despite the literacy of a surprising number of European and American soldiers from the 18th century, artifacts used during military service provide a much broader range of sources and provide important perspectives into the military experience. The interaction with objects that crossed from civilian to military realms as well as engagement with items made specifically for military purposes all provide important opportunities to deepen our understanding of people’s experiences of warfare in the long 18th century.

Furthermore, artifacts created for military ends provide linkages back to the civilians that often created them, deepening the definitions, and broadening the boundaries of traditional military history. Military artifacts speak to the intersection of long-standing trade practices with the growing centralization, capitalization, and industrialization of fiscal military states that were developing in the 18th century. The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks papers relating broadly to material culture made, used, or altered in a military context. From soldier’s encounters with domestic furnishings on campaign, to the weapons designed and built for battle, military history and material culture are profoundly connected.

We are seeking out new research from established scholars in addition to graduate students, professionals, and artisans that relate to material culture made, used, or altered in a military context between roughly 1609 – 1815. Papers may engage but are not limited to:

  • Objects made for military purposes
  • Civilian objects used in military contexts
  • Archeological research into sites of military occupation
  • Ephemeral material cultures such as food or fuel
  • Military material culture crossing cultural, national, and geographic lines
  • Construction and fabrication of material culture
  • Craft, trade, experimental archeology, or living history perspectives on material culture
  • Art and representations of material culture in military contexts

This conference will be held online, using Zoom Webinars, on Saturday, January 21, 2023. Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Traditional illustrated papers, combined with live or recorded videos of trade practice or object analysis will all be accepted for consideration. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with an honorarium. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by July 1, 2022, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Learn more about Virtual Material Matters: It’s in the Details

Posted: May 4, 2022
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


CFP: The Conference on Women and the Civil War 2022

DEADLINE: July 25, 2022

The Society for Women and the Civil War
The Conference on Women and the Civil War 2022: Women of the Valley
July 22 – 24, 2022, in Harrisonburg, Virginia

The Society invites proposals for presentations examining the lives, service and contributions of Civil War-era women in the Shenandoah regional cultural area during intervals of peace, military campaigning, and occupation. It particularly welcomes presentations on the roles of women in agriculture; women replacing male labor on farms, in business, in education, and in transportation; the means by which educational systems continued despite disruptions; the effects of occupation on society and the economy; the protection and preservation of civilian resources during military campaigning and occupation; the impact of occupation and military rule upon civilians; defense of homes and property, and resistance against occupation; the roles of religious congregations in community assistance; relationships and interaction between different sociological groups in the area; women pacifists during the war; and the effects of technology upon women during the war. Proposals for presentations regarding other relevant topics will be welcomed for consideration.

Potential speakers should submit by electronic means:

  • A synopsis of the presentation, not more than three (3) pages. The synopsis must indicate why the presentation is related to the conference theme. It must also include a description of visual and physical aids used to illustrate and highlight the presentation, and identify the technology required to use the aids.
  • A bibliography of the sources used, with an emphasis on the primary sources.
  • A personal biography of not more than two (2) pages, including a listing of credentials, prior presentations (if any), publications (if any), and contact information. Links to on-line presentations made previously are considered quite useful.

Submissions will be evaluated principally upon the following criteria:

  • Originality of the topic.
  • Relevancy of the topic to the lives and efforts of women in the Civil War era and to the conference theme.
  • Quality of research, highlighting the use of primary sources.
  • Quality of the presentation, including the use of visual aids.
  • Presentation ability of the speaker.
  • Anticipated attendee interest level for the topic.
  • Originality of the presentation.

Submissions from graduate students are encouraged. Subjects examined from a micro-history perspective are also welcomed. Displays on topics related to the theme are welcome.

Please send submissions, and any questions or inquires, to: swcw1865@gmail.com
ATTN: 2022 Conference Speaker Proposals.

All Submissions must be received by November 1, 2021.

Posted: September 7, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers


27th Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies in Uppsala, Sweden

DEADLINE: September 2, 2022

Please join us for the 27th Biennial conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies at Uppsala University May 25–27, 2023. The theme of the conference is “Crises and Turns: Continuities and Discontinuities in American Culture”.

We welcome panel and paper proposals that engage with continuities or discontinuities in American social, political, historical, or cultural life or within the field of American studies. We seek contributions in a wide array of disciplines, including, but not limited to history, politics, literature, film and media studies, sociology, art history, visual studies, gender studies, critical race and ethnicity studies, the environmental humanities etc. We also welcome papers on any topic related to American studies.

Deadline: September 1, 2022

Visit the NAAS website to learn more

Posted: April 6, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Trafalgar Chronicle, “The Natives of the Georgian Era – An International Perspective”

DEADLINE: September 2, 2022

For the 2023 edition of the Trafalgar Chronicle, the editors seek carefully researched articles on ‘The navies of the Georgian Era – an International Perspective’. We want research and analysis on the battles, operations, voyages and historically significant events and interactions concerning the world’s navies in the Georgian era, 1714 – 1837.

The Trafalgar Chronicle is the scholarly flagship publication of The 1805 Club, a non-profit organization with an international membership of scholars and enthusiasts of the Georgian maritime era. The 1805 Club takes its name from the iconic Battle of Trafalgar that gave Nelson his acclaimed place in history and confirmed the role of the Royal Navy in asserting Britain’s sea power.

Additional Topics: We also seek general interest articles with unique perspectives on the maritime and naval history of the Georgian era. We invite biographical portraits, articles about battles at sea, maritime economics, exploration of foreign shores, foreign relations, politics, etc. We also welcome well-documented reports on preservation efforts regarding the artefacts, graves, memorials, and monuments of the Nelson era.

Proposal Submission Guidelines: Please submit a proposal/abstract of no more than 500 words and a paragraph about your background (a biographical sketch). Proposals are due September 1, 2022. Applicants will be notified of acceptance status by October 1, 2022. Submit all proposals and inquiries to tc.editor@1805Club.org. Detailed author guidelines are available upon request.

Article Guidelines: Articles should be 3000 to 5000 words long in MSWORD (unprotected) following the Modern Humanities Research Association (MHRA) style guide. Please include 2 to 5 high resolution illustrations. Articles are due February 1, 2023, at which point they will be edited and, in some cases, submitted to peer review. Articles will be returned to authors for revisions by March 1, 2023. Revisions are due April 1, 2023. Publication will be Fall 2023.

While we do not pay our contributors, each author who is a member of The 1805 Club will receive a copy of the Trafalgar Chronicle upon publication. All authors will also receive a PDF of their published article for their portfolio, reprint requests, or to feature on a website or a blog. To join The 1805 Club, submit a membership application at www.1805Club.org.

Our Contributors: We welcome articles from 1805 Club members and anyone with an interest in the history of the Georgian Navy and other navies of the period. Our articles have come from writers of varied backgrounds: historians, journalists, university students, military personnel, preservationists, and novelists. Contact tc.editor@1805Club.org for additional information.

Read more about the Trafalgar Chronicle

Posted: May 4, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution

DEADLINE: September 26, 2022

Call for Papers
Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution
September 23–25, 2022

Fort Ticonderoga seeks proposals for the Eighteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution to be held Friday–Sunday, September 23–25, 2022.

Many states, as well as national entities, are already beginning the process of planning for the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of American Independence. Current events, from the end of America’s longest war of Afghanistan to fundamental questions about the democracy that was created nearly 250 years ago provide new context to explorations of one of the longest, bitterest, and most consequential conflicts in American history.

The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks proposals for new research on this critical period of the 18th century from a variety of perspectives, participants, and methodologies. Established scholars, graduate students, and others are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers broadly addressing the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the War for American Independence. We are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international nature of the conflict, representing the variety of peoples and places involved.

We welcome interdisciplinary backgrounds and approaches roughly covering the period from the 1760s to the 1780s. Papers may include or engage:

Material Culture

  • Biographical Analysis
  • Social and Cultural Histories
  • Global Theatres of War
  • Archaeological Studies
  • Indigenous Perspectives

Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with partial travel reimbursement. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by January 31, 2022, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Learn more about the Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution

Posted: October 15, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The Future of the Dutch Colonial Past (Amsterdam University Press, 2022)

DEADLINE: October 1, 2022

The Amsterdam Museum, in collaboration with various key partners, is seeking submissions for an upcoming peer-reviewed publication on the topic of Dutch colonial heritage in the context of the present. This publication will build on the symposium by the same title that will take place in Amsterdam on November 26th and 27th, 2021, The Future of the Dutch Colonial Past. Besides the contributions originating from this symposium, the publication aims to include six additional essays from upcoming and established scholars and practitioners in the international field of Dutch colonial heritage. The goal is to compile a topical and polyvocal reader which offers a critical overview of recent developments in dealing with the Dutch colonial past in heritage institutions, archives, and academia, as well as insight into future developments.

Theme

The Netherlands has seen many recent examples of cultural institutions addressing the Dutch colonial past, its legacies, and afterlives. Museums are dedicating exhibitions to similar themes and incorporating present-day perspectives, such as Slavery (Rijksmuseum), Aan de Surinaamse grachten (Museum van Loon), and The Golden Coach (Amsterdam Museum). In 2020, the government-commissioned report Colonial Collections and Recognition of Injustice was published, which stated that the government should show a willingness to return looted colonial art. Research projects such as the Pilot Project Provenance Research on Objects of the Colonial Era (PPROCE) and Pressing Matters: Ownership, Value and the Question of Colonial Heritage in Museums address the methodology and execution of provenance research, from which concrete steps towards restitution and redress can be taken. From the archive to artistic practices and public space, a reckoning with the Dutch colonial past is simultaneously taking place in different areas. Not just heritage objects, but the knowledge, symbols, and language that we work with today are subject to a re-evaluation.

Symposium and publication

The symposium is aimed at confronting this deep-rooted prevalence of the Dutch colonial past in our present-day cultural and academic practices. The publication will expand the exploration of the questions posed during the symposium, through which we seek to connect the approaches of cultural institutions, artists, and academics in order to further the collective conversation and turn it into tangible results. Though the initial focus is directed at the Dutch context, it is evident that the Dutch colonial past connects to multiple international contexts and has influenced cultural and academic institutions worldwide. We therefore invite contributions that connect to the Dutch colonial past in a multiplicity of ways. Contributions from writers who are based in Indonesia, the Dutch Caribbean, and Suriname, as well as Africa and Asia, are highly sought after, in addition to writers in other international contexts who see a connection between their academic, curatorial, or artistic practice and the Dutch colonial past (in the present). We encourage contributors to refrain from writing practice-based articles, but instead to use a broad, reflexive approach towards curatorial and artistic practices, methodologies, and policies. How does your practice relate to broader societal developments, institutions, and power structures, and what are the takeaways for future research?

Amsterdam Museum and the Golden Coach exhibition

The Amsterdam Museum is the key organizing partner of this symposium. By putting this subject on the agenda, it aims to take its own practice as an object of analysis. The symposium follows the museum’s major exhibition The Golden Coach (June 18, 2021 – February 27, 2022). The exhibition reflects on the Golden Coach, a widely discussed object that has been loaned to the museum by the Royal Collections of the Netherlands. The carriage was gifted to the Dutch queen, Wilhelmina, for her inauguration in 1898, and until recently it has been used annually by the royal family on Prince’s Day, as well as for weddings and other ceremonies. It has become contested heritage, partially due to the romanticized depiction of the Dutch colonies on the panels on one side of the carriage. The exhibition features a multiplicity of voices and perspectives on the carriage, both current as well as historical, and gives insight into the shifting social and political contexts of Amsterdam from the late 18th century until today. With an extensive public program and a large-scale research project, the Amsterdam Museum aims to facilitate a public dialogue on a national level regarding contested heritage and identities.

In 2019 the museum initiated a public discussion on the use of the term “Golden Age.” After years of New Narratives programmes and numerous discussions with different communities, this was a logical next step in the process of removing invisible societal barriers and promoting inclusiveness. The intense national and international discussion that followed taught the museum the importance of talking and listening to one another. These conversations may cause friction along the way but can eventually create connection and understanding. In order to stimulate this debate, the museum involved people from all over the Netherlands in the research project on the Golden Coach from an early stage. It did this by setting up a public study room, a traveling installation that poses questions to people on the street about the Golden Coach, a quantitative national research project, a programme of events to accompany the exhibition, and a consulting collaboration with a sounding board group, and by including reflections by contemporary artists on the current debate. The focus has been on an interdisciplinary and polyvocal methodology, where dialogue and the exchange of ideas and opinions has been central.

The practices applied within this particular project, in connection with all the other initiatives which are currently taking place in the wider Dutch context, in which the questioning of Dutch colonial heritage is the focus, motivate the necessity of this publication. What meaning will we assign to Dutch colonial heritage in future cultural and academic institutions and their practices?

We are interested in the following themes:

  • Repair and Redress
  • Iconoclasm: Toppling Statues, Changing Street Names, Challenging Dominant Narratives
  • Curating Contested Heritage
  • Decoloniality in Academic Research, Activism, and Artistic Practice
  • Artistic Practices and Reflections
  • Rereading the Archive

Contributions should reflect on, but are not limited to, the following questions:

  • In what ways do contemporary cultural practices within, on the margins of, and outside institutions contribute to shaping and establishing new narratives concerning the Dutch colonial past?
  • What challenges do you face in an institution’s reckoning with the colonial past, and what solutions do you propose within your field or practice?
  • What recent developments in artistic/academic/curatorial practices have made key changes to the context in which you operate, and how do these reflect grappling with the (Dutch) colonial past?
  • What does decolonizing mean in the context of your practice?

Deadline for submissions: December 1, 2021

Please submit an abstract of max. 300 words along with your CV to Rowan Stol.

Deadline for a first version of your full essay: February 28, 2022

The total word count for full essay submissions should be 5,000–6,000, including references.

The book will be published in September 2022

Editorial board: Pepijn Brandon, Karwan Fatah-Black, Imara Limon, Wayne Modest, and Margriet Schavemaker.

Read more on the Amsterdam Museum website

Posted: November 18, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers - White House History Quarterly

DEADLINE: July 31, 2023

White House History Quarterly features articles on the historic White House and its occupants. With the knowledge that the White House is one of the most richly documented houses in the world and the premier symbol of the American presidency, we publish original research that draws from these resources as well as first-hand interviews, secondary accounts, and the vast wealth of illustrations of all kinds, from drawings to photographs, in exploring the many aspects of so extensive a past. We serve a varied readership, both popular and academic, interested in history, architecture, and biography, all of which we present in the context of the White House and its ongoing traditions.

Prospective authors are encouraged to submit proposals for articles, in the form of abstracts, for the editor’s review. Please refer to the Call for Papers for a list of topics currently being considered for general thematic issues. These include: The White House that Wasn’t; Pets and Working Animals at the White House; Military Roles in the White House; The White House During World War II; White House Traditions; The White House and Philadelphia; The White House in Literature and Poetry; Faith and the White House, America 250; White House History in Historic Cemeteries. Topics for other issues may include presidential biography; first family biography; and studies of documentary letters, journals, diaries, and illustrations that relate to the White House.

Authors interested in submitting an article are asked to complete the White House History Quarterly abstract submissions form or contact the publications office at books@whha.org.

Download the abstract form

Posted: April 21, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

DEADLINE: August 1, 2031

Cambridge Scholars Publishing are inviting proposals for academic books and edited collections in Humanities and Social Sciences. We would be pleased if you would consider submitting a proposal.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing are committed to supporting long-form research dissemination in all our fields of academic and scholarly publishing, through the publication of monographs and edited collections. This is, and will remain, our core focus in the years ahead. We publish in all major fields of academic research and practice, including Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, and Health Sciences. You can read more about our approach to ‘Doing Simple Things, Well’ in the No Shelf Required online magazine.

2021 marks the 20th anniversary of our foundation in Cambridge, UK. Over that time, we have grown to be one of the world’s leading scholarly book publishers, with a backlist of more than 8000 titles, and more than 700 academic books due to publish this year. Cambridge Scholars Publishing Limited is not affiliated to, or associated with, Cambridge University Press or the University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing aim to put our authors at the heart of everything we do. We bring that ambition into our publishing operations with our Author Promises:

  • Fast, fair, and friendly proposal review.
  • Publication in handsome hardback, as well as eBook formats, for our academic library customers.

  • Worldwide distribution to research and study centers across the globe, via our international network including Amazon, Ebsco/GOBI, ProQuest, and Ingram.

  • A book published with us is always in-stock, and always available for sale, thanks to our unique Print on Time global distribution system.

  • An escalating royalty payment—the more titles sold, the higher the royalty rate, from the first copy sold.

  • No charges for publication.

Our authors also can contribute to our unique Book in Focus series, which you can read about on our website.

 

Submit a book proposal and for further information

Posted: August 9, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers