THOUGHT

PROVOKING

Book a Distinguished Lecturer from the Organization of American Historians for your next event.

Woman speaking at podium

VMI Photo by - H. Lockwood McLaughlin

WHY A HISTORIAN?

Our OAH Distinguished Lecturers are scholars and storytellers, uniquely qualified to bring historical context to some of today's most provocative issues. They engage audiences, sharing monumental moments and unknown stories from our nation's past that influence and inform our world today. The Distinguished Lectureship Program offers Virtual OAH Lectures (custom-recorded or live with Q&A) and traditional in-person OAH Distinguished Lectures. 

This has been a great experience and I am looking forward to being able to bring more speakers from the OAH Distinguished Lectureship Program to our district.

Bonnie Belshe, Monta Vista High School - Fremont Union High School District

Featured Lecturer

Portrait of lecturer

Frederick E. Hoxie

Fred Hoxie is a professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he was formerly the Swanlund Professor of History, Law, and American Indian Studies. An elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has served as a consultant both to Indian tribes and government agencies. His current research focuses on American Indian and indigenous political activism in the United States and beyond. His publications include A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians (1984); Parading Through History: The Making of the Crow Nation in America, 1805-1935 (1995); Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive...
Read More

Featured Lecture

Indian Affairs in the Twenty-First Century

How do the new realities of the Trump era affect Native people? This lecture reviews recent economic and political shifts as well as an evolving legal landscape to examine the prospects for Native sovereignty and Indian community development in the 21st century.

"So, casinos now generate more cash for Native Americans than the Bureau of Indian Affairs. So: Is the 'Indian Problem' solved? "