Digital History

Homepage screen capture, Sherman's March and America: Mapping Memory, a project of OAH Distinguished Lecturer Anne Sarah Rubin

"Our task, it seems to me, is to reconstitute the liberal arts for the digital age, to construct new forms of scholarly communication suitable for the digital medium, and to lower barriers to the preservation and exchange of knowledge wherever we might find them." —OAH Distinguished Lecturer William Thomas, speaking on "Why the Digital, Why the Digital Liberal Arts?" at Middlebury College, December 2014

Thinking about how your institution organizes and engages with the digital? Invite one of the digital historians listed below into the conversation.


Edward L. Ayers

Edward L. Ayers
University of Richmond

Keisha N. Blain

Keisha N. Blain *
University of Pittsburgh

Orville Vernon Burton

Orville Vernon Burton
Clemson University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Emeritus)

Thomas Dublin

Thomas Dublin
Binghamton University, State University of New York

James N. Gregory

James N. Gregory
University of Washington

Melanie Gustafson

Melanie Gustafson *
University of Vermont

Daisy Martin

Daisy Martin
Stanford University

Andy Mink

Andy Mink
National Humanities Center

Katherine Ott

Katherine Ott
Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History

Matthew Pinsker

Matthew Pinsker
Dickinson College
 Has Video Presentation

Claire Bond Potter

Claire Bond Potter
The New School

Tom Scheinfeldt

Tom Scheinfeldt
University of Connecticut

Susan  Schulten

Susan Schulten
University of Denver

Constance B. Schulz

Constance B. Schulz
University of South Carolina (Emeritus)

Randall Stephens

Randall Stephens
University of Oslo

William G. Thomas III

William G. Thomas III
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
 Has Video Presentation

Laura Wexler

Laura Wexler
Yale University

Jeannie Whayne

Jeannie Whayne
University of Arkansas

Kenneth J. Winkle

Kenneth J. Winkle
University of Nebraska-Lincoln