An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States

After the U.S.-Mexican War, the Spanish language became a language of politics as Spanish speakers in the U.S. Southwest used it to build territorial and state governments; only in the twentieth century did it become a language of immigrants and exclusion.

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States

After the U.S.-Mexican War, the Spanish language became a language of politics as Spanish speakers in the U.S. Southwest used it to build territorial and state governments; only in the twentieth century did it become a language of immigrants and exclusion.

Lecture Description

The nation has always been multilingual, and Spanish-language rights, in particular, have remained an important political issue into the present. In the decades after the US-Mexican War, Spanish was visible on a broad array of items: on ballots; on stage, where translators next to political speakers could be seen and were expected; in governors’ proclamations; and in officially sanctioned translations of state laws. In the twentieth century, Spanish became a political language where its speakers and those opposed to its use clashed over what its presence in the United States meant and whether to allow its continuation. This lecture traces the major arguments of Lozano’s book An American Language.

CATEGORIES

Latino Latina Politics

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