Defiant Braceros: How Migrant Workers Fought for Racial, Sexual, and Political Freedom

Lecture Description

This talk interrogates the private lives of migrant men who participated in the Bracero Program (1942–1964), a binational agreement between the United States and Mexico that allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican workers to enter this country on temporary work permits. While this program and the issue of temporary workers has long been politicized on both sides of the border, Dr. Loza argues that the prevailing romanticized image of braceros as a family-oriented, productive, legal workforce has obscured the real, diverse experiences of the workers themselves. Focusing on underexplored aspects of workers’ lives–such as their transnational union-organizing efforts, the sexual economies of both hetero and queer workers, and the ethno-racial boundaries among Mexican indigenous braceros—this talk reveals how these men defied perceived political, sexual, and racial norms.

CATEGORIES

Latino Latina Migration/Migrant

ALL TOPICS & TITLES: Go back to all topics and titles.


More Distinguished Lectureship Program Resources