His Lover and Friend Too, in Which a Hawaiian Chief Takes an English Captain as a Lover, Explores the Pacific, Cultivates His Power, Is Killed in Battle, and Changes the Way We Think about the “Age of Exploration”

Lecture Description

This lecture tells the story of Kaʻianaʻahuʻula, a Hawaiian high chief. In 1782 and 1783, he toured the Pacific (including Macao, the Philippines, Palau, the Aleutian Islands, and Vancouver Island) in the company of an English captain he had taken as a lover. He then returned to Hawaiʻi, where he used his high rank and his knowledge of the world to cultivate his power further. He was an ally of Kamehameha, but turned on him in a final battle, and was killed. His story makes us rethink the history of exploration: all peoples in the early modern world were involved in it, including indigenous peoples, and individuals used exploration to pursue their own political agendas.

CATEGORIES

Transnational and Comparative Transportation, Travel, and Exploration

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