Recy Taylor and the Roots of the #MeToo Movement

"The 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, often heralded as the opening scene of the civil rights movement, was in many ways, one of the last acts of a decades-long struggle to protect black women, like Taylor, from sexualized violence and rape."

Lecture Description

In 1944, in Abbeville, Alabama, an African American woman named Recy Taylor walked home from a church revival. A car full of white men kidnapped her off the street, drove her to the woods and gang raped her at gunpoint. Then they dropped her off in the middle of town and told her they would kill her if she told anyone what happened. But that night, she told her husband, father and the local sheriff about the assault.
A few days later the NAACP called to say they were sending their very best investigator.

Her name was Rosa Parks.

Rosa Parks carried Taylor’s story back to Montgomery where she and the city’s most militant activists organized what the Chicago Defender called “the strongest campaign for equal justice in a decade.” Eleven years later this group of homegrown activists would become better known as the Montgomery Improvement Association, vaunting it’s president, Martin Luther King Jr. to international prominence and launching a movement, the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, that would help change the world. But when the coalition first took root, Dr. King was still in High School.

The 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, often heralded as the opening scene of the civil rights movement, was in many ways, one of the last acts of a decades-long struggle to protect black women, like Taylor, from sexualized violence and rape.
Indeed, major civil rights campaigns in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina had roots in organized resistance to sexual violence.

This lecture uses the story of Recy Taylor (and other survivors of racialized sexual violence) to highlight how African American women have long been at the center of protests against sexual violence and how those protests often led to major social movements. African American women testified about sexual assault decades before anyone took back the night, made the personal political or said “Me,Too.”

CATEGORIES

African American Social Movements

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