Ariela J. Gross

Ariela J. Gross

Image credit: Sophia Goldman

Ariela J. Gross is the John B. and Alice R. Sharp Professor of Law and History, and a co-director of the Center for Law, History, and Culture, at the University of Southern California. She is the author of Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana (with Alejandro de la Fuente); What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America (2008) which was named a Choice outstanding academic title, co-winner of the James Willard Hurst Prize, and winner of the Lillian Smith Award and the American Political Science Association's Best Book on Race, Ethnicity, and Politics; and Double Character: Slavery and Mastery in the Antebellum Southern Courtroom (2000). She is currently working on a study of race, law, and conservatism in post–World War II America, as well as a book on the uses of the history of slavery in contemporary law and politics.

Twitter: @arielagross.

Lectures

  • Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana
  • Comparative Race and Slavery in the Americas
  • Law, Politics, and the Memory of Slavery in the United States and Europe
  • Race and Modern Conservative Movements
  • Race, Citizenship, and the U.S. Constitution *
  • Race, Gender, and the U.S. Constitution *
  • Slavery and the Law in the United States
  • Slavery, Antislavery, and the Coming of the Civil War
  • Slavery, Reconstruction, and the Constitution
  • The History of Race and Racism in the United States
  • The Past and Future of Civil Rights *
  • The Reconstruction Amendments at 150
  • White Nationalism in the Twentieth Century and Beyond *


Lectures marked with a * are offered as part of the OAH's initiative, Historians' Perspectives on the Rise of Donald Trump.