Patrick Rael

Patrick Rael

A professor of history at Bowdoin College, Patrick Rael is a specialist in African American history. His most recent book, Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865 (2015), was a finalist for the Harriet Tubman Prize, awarded by the New York Library’s Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. His other works include Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North (2002), African American Activism before the Civil War: The Freedom Struggle in the Antebellum North (2008), and Pamphlets of Protest: An Anthology of Early African-American Protest Literature (2001). He has written extensively about teaching, has contributed to the development of African American history curricula, and for over a decade has led seminars and workshops on teaching American history in primary and secondary schools.

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Lectures

  • Did Nat Turner "Confess"?
  • Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777–1865
  • A Contest Not Yet Closed: The Prospects for Reconstruction in 1865
  • Slaves on Film: Popular Cinema and the Civil War Era
  • Reel Memories: Film and the Popular History of the Civil Rights Movement
  • Chamberlain at Round Top: How Historians Work
  • Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain in History and Memory: Reappraising America's Heroes
  • What Good is History? Challenging the Three Big History Clichés
  • Abraham Lincoln's High-Wire Act: Race and Politics before the Civil War
  • Roadmaps to History: How to Read and Write Historical Arguments
  • African American Activism before the Civil War
  • Historical Reflections on the Interracial Struggle to End Slavery
  • Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Slave Narratives and the Antislavery Struggle
  • What the Fathers Founded: The Constitution, Slavery, and Resistance before the Civil War
  • Reconstruction: The Second Phase of the Civil War
  • Where Did the Reconstruction Amendments Come From?