Meal Functions

Meal Functions - 2020 OAH Annual Meeting Conference on American History

All OAH Annual Meeting attendees are invited to take part in several networking events designed to allow you to meet, mingle, and connect with peers with either similar interests or with those who are in similar situations. All but one reception is open to all attendees and includes limited food and beverage, and all paid lunch options offer free or subsidized tickets to specified groups such as graduate students.

We look forward to having you at the 2020 OAH Annual Meeting!

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 2
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Complimentary drink ticket included with registration

OAH Opening Night Reception

Celebrate the opening day of the conference with peers in the Exhibit Hall. Enjoy drinks, snacks, and a chance to meet with friends while browsing the exhibits and museum displays. Take this opportunity to visit and talk with exhibitor representatives, plan your book-shopping strategy, and meet colleagues before dinner!


THURSDAY, APRIL 2
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Immigration and Ethnic History Society (IEHS)

Dessert Before Dinner

The Immigration and Ethnic History Society invites attendees to the annual reception for graduate students and early career scholars. The IEHS promotes the study of the history of immigration and the study of ethnic groups in the United States, including regional groups, Native Americans, and forced immigrants.


Offsite Event: National Museum of American History, “Because of Her Story” Reception

This reception concludes an afternoon of activities at the National Museum of American History (NMAH) honoring Dr. Anthea Hartig, the first woman Director of the NMAH, and celebrating the Centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment. Attendees will enjoy a wine and cheese reception and get to meet the “Because of Her Story: Women’s History and the Public” panelists including: Dr. Hartig, Dr. Linda Gordon, Dr. Catherine Ceniza Choy, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, and Dr. Marcia Chatelain. The reception is generously sponsored by the Women’s Research and Resource Center at Spelman College, the Department of History at Mt. Holyoke College, and the Society of Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

Transportation to and from the museum is at the discretion of the attendee.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

By invitation only

Distinguished Members, Donors, and Award Winners Reception

The OAH is pleased to invite our longtime members, major donors, and award winners to a special reception as a token of our appreciation for their continued support and involvement with the organization.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the German Association for American Studies (GAAS) and the German Historical Institute Washington 

International Reception 

The OAH International Committee welcomes all conference attendees interested in faculty and student exchanges and other efforts to promote global ties among historians of the United States. The Reception is sponsored by the German Association for American Studies (GAAS) and the German Historical Institute (GHI) Washington. The GAAS is a hub for scholars of the United States in Germany: scholars of American literature, culture, politics, and history. The GHI is an institute for the advanced study of history, which promotes research through fellowships, conferences, and publications.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Graduate Students Reception

We welcome graduate students to attend this reception which offers an opportunity to share experiences and make lasting connections.  Meet with fellow attendees and representatives from the OAH.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Non-Tenure Track Faculty Reception

The Committee on Part-Time, Adjunct, and Contingent Employment (CPACE) invites you to meet committee members and to chat about issues related to non-tenure track members of the history profession, including the development of a caucus.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the OAH Committee on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Historians and Histories 

LGBTQ Reception

Please join the Committee of LGBTQ Historians and Histories for a reception at the 2020 OAH Annual Meeting from 6:00–7:30 pm. The winner of the John D’Emilio Dissertation Prize will be celebrated at the reception. 


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Independent Scholars Reception

We welcome independent scholars to attend this reception which offers an opportunity to share experiences and make lasting connections. Meet with fellow attendees over bites and beverages.


SHGAPE Reception

SHGAPE will host a reception for all SHGAPE members and meeting attendees interested in the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. SHGAPE was formed in 1989 to encourage innovative and wide-ranging research and teaching on this critical period of historical transformation. SHGAPE publishes the quarterly Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and awards book and article prizes for distinguished scholarship.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)

LAWCHA Reception

Join LAWCHA for an evening of lively solidarity and collegiality with scholars and activists at our annual membership meeting and reception to hear what LAWCHA has been doing and celebrate with travel grant and scholarship award recipients. It will immediately follow an address by LAWCHA President Julie Greene, titled, "Rethinking the Boundaries of Class: Lessons from Transnational Labor History and the Neoliberal University," with responses from Joe William Trotter, Lara Putnam and Trevor Griffey.


OAH President's Reception

All attendees are cordially invited to the OAH President’s Closing Reception in honor of OAH President Joanne Meyerowitz. Please join us in thanking her for her service to the organization and the history profession following the OAH Presidential Address.


 

FRIDAY, APRIL 3
11:30 am–1:00 pm

Pre-registration required

Limited seating: 100
Cost: $65
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by the OAH Committee on the Status of Women in the Historical Profession

Women's Committee Luncheon: Historiography and Presumed Incompetent: Women in Academia and Beyond

Presenter: Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs, Seattle University

Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs, Ph.D., is a Professor in Modern Languages and Women and Gender Studies, past Director for The Center for The Study of Justice in Society, and, now, Theiline Pigott McCone Chair in Humanities. She is a poet, literary critic, cultural worker, and mother. She is the author/editor of eight books of poetry, criticism, and culture, and multiple articles, encyclopedia entries, and opinion pieces. She received her MA and Ph.D. from Stanford University. She studied Master’s degree work in Mexico, Spain, France, Portugal and Brazil. She is first editor of Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia, Volume I. She has presented her work all over the world, multilingually, and specializes in expanding subjectivity. She was a Commissioner for the Arts for the state of Washington (2014—2017) and is the daughter of migrant farmworkers, as well as a past field and cannery worker herself. Her poetry has been anthologized and read around the world, and she has given keynotes and poetry readings globally.

Through the generosity of the listed sponsors, the members of the OAH Committee on the Status of Women in the Historical Profession are able to offer free luncheon tickets to graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. To request a free ticket, first pre-register for the conference and then send an email to womenslunch@oah.org before March 13. The complimentary ticket will be added by our staff, and you will receive a revised registration confirmation.


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
11:30 am–1:00 pm

Pre-registration required


Limited seating: 65
Cost: $65
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

SHGAPE Luncheon: "Frederick Douglass in the Gilded Age"

Presenter: David W. Blight, Yale University

David W. Blight is the Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University and the Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale.  He is the author of numerous books and articles, including American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era (Harvard University Press, 2011) and Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Harvard University Press, 1991), which won the Bancroft Prize, among other awards. His most recent book is Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom (Simon & Schuster, 2018), which won both the 2019 Bancroft Prize and Pulitzer Prize in History.


SHGAPE is able to offer a limited number of luncheon tickets to graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. After you have registered for the OAH conference, please send an email to alwood@ilstu.edu before March 13 if you would like a ticket to the SHGAPE luncheon. 


SATURDAY, APRIL 4
11:30 am–1:00 pm

Pre-registration required


Limited seating: 100
Cost: $65
Limited $45 tickets for NTT faculty/ adjuncts
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by Al Camarillo and the OAH Committee on the Status of African American, Latino/a, Asian American, and Native American (ALANA) Historians and ALANA Histories

Al Camarillo ALANA Forum on Race and Ethnic Studies in American History: Porous Borders and Multiracial Histories, In and Out of the Archive

Presenter: Julian Lim, Arizona State University

Julian Lim is an assistant professor of History at Arizona State University (Tempe). Trained in history and law, she focuses on immigration, borders, and race. Lim's first, award-winning book,  Porous Borders: Multiracial Migrations and the Law in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), examines the history of diverse immigrants in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and the development of immigration policy and law on both sides of the border. She has also published articles and essays on race, immigration, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands in the Pacific Historical Review, the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive EraModern American History, and in law review journals. She is a recipient of several awards and grants, and has received a Stanford Humanities Center fellowship for 2019-20. She is currently working on two separate projects: the first is a book about marriage priorities in U.S. immigration law, and the second is an exploration of migration, law, and American empire in the socio-legal borderlands that defined U.S. mainland and overseas expansion from the 1880s

The OAH Committee on the Status of African American, Latino/a, Asian American, and Native American (ALANA) Historians and ALANA Histories with the support of Al Camarillo is able to offer a limited number of free lunch tickets for graduate students and $45 subsidized tickets for non-tenured track and adjunct faculty. Please email alana@oah.org before registering if you would like a ticket.


SATURDAY, APRIL 4
11:30 am–1:00 pm

Email for free tickets | Limited to 50

Sponsored by the HistoryMakers

Disappearing Act: Saving Twentieth Century African American Archives: …a Moral and Cultural Imperative

Presenters: Julieanna L. Richardson, The HistoryMakers and Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

It has become a major concern that we as a nation are at risk of losing most of the significant archival documentation of 20th Century African American history and accomplishments—a fate that will severely cripple the academic study of African American history and achievement, and a slew of other disciplines that would be left without a complete record of the contributions and innovations pushed forward by African Americans. Many of the most compelling and rich sources are hidden away in the personal papers of African Americans across the country who have never been approached or made aware of the historical value these documents possess. Most U.S. repositories, libraries, archives, and historical societies are already severely underrepresented with regards to their African American collections and holdings. Society as a whole is rapidly becoming a visual culture, and an archive like The HistoryMakers Digital Archive is committed to being the digital repository for African Americans in the digital age. Given that less than 1% of the over 3,000 accomplished and noteworthy African Americans that we have interviewed have plans for their papers, and that more than 2,000 of the interviewees are age 70 and above, the identification, preservation, documentation, and accessibility of these papers and collections is an absolute imperative not only for ensuring a more complete and accurate record of American history, but also for the future of scholarship in a myriad of academic disciplines. The HistoryMakers has already assembled the nation’s – and the world’s – largest repository of 20th century African American oral testimony, but without the support and collaboration of scholars across the globe to surround this collection with the contextual and documentary evidence necessary to provide a better picture of the history these testimonies allude to, all of our understanding of the past and the future will be hampered. Join The HistoryMakers Founder and President, Julieanna Richardson, as she addresses the insidious issues of the lack of African American representation in the archives, as well as a roadmap forward towards alleviating this issue for archivists and scholars alike.

To register: Please RSVP to The HistoryMakers at info@thehistorymakers.org, or (312) 674-1900, no later than Monday, March 23, 2020.


SATURDAY, APRIL 4
11:30 am–1:00 pm

Email for free tickets | Limited to 40

Sponsored by the Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600–2000 

The Women and Social Movements in the United States, 16002000 Luncheon

Presenters: 
Rebecca Jo Plant, Women and gender history; U.S. Civil War;
Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Ohio State University
Thomas Dublin, co-editor of the Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the U.S.
Jill Jensen, editor of Women and Development: The Social Movement, 1919–2019

The Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600—2000 (WASM), an electronic journal and digital database published by Alexander Street Press and ProQuest, will be sponsoring a luncheon at the OAH Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of U.S. women’s suffrage, we will feature work in WASM related to rethinking women’s political engagement, particularly in light of race and empire. Please join us!  The event is free but seats are limited. 

Please register with ProQuest here and they will confirm your participation before the OAH.

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 3
7:00 am–8:00 am

First-come, first-served

Sponsored by Forrest T. Jones

Welcome Breakfast for New Members and First-Time Attendees

Begin your day with complimentary coffee and a light continental breakfast with OAH staff and leadership. Members of the OAH Membership Committee will be available to answer any questions you have on how to make the most of your Annual Meeting experience and your OAH membership.


SATURDAY, APRIL 4
7:00 am–8:00 am
First-come, first-served

Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

Community College Historians Breakfast

Join your fellow colleagues at the eleventh annual Community College Historians Breakfast! College historians are invited to gather to network and meet with members of the OAH Committee on Community Colleges to discuss new developments in history departments at America’s community colleges.