Meal Functions

All OAH Conference on American History attendees are invited to take part in several networking events designed to allow you to meet, mingle, and connect with peers who have similar interests or with those who are in similar situations. All but one reception is open to all attendees and includes limited food and beverage, and all paid lunch options offer free or subsidized tickets to specified groups such as graduate students.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
8:45 am–10:15 am
$25

Join us for the 2021 Conference Kick Off Networking Breakfast!

Kick off your morning, welcome back your peers, and network before the first full day. Meet up with friends and socialize, make new connections or meet a new conference-buddy! The Kick Off Breakfast will include a continental breakfast and welcoming remarks by OAH Program Committee Co-Chair Suzanne Smith, George Mason University.

Featuring CBYD, a long-standing jazz group hailing from New London, in Southeastern Connecticut. This jazz quartet is influenced by a diverse range of music outside the jazz idiom, the group enjoys the ‘spontaneous lively discussions’ expressed and experienced on the band stand.

 

THURSDAY, March 31
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Complimentary drink ticket included with registration

OAH Opening Night Reception

Celebrate the opening day of the conference with peers in the Exhibit Hall. Enjoy drinks, snacks, and a chance to meet with friends while browsing the exhibits and museum displays. Take this opportunity to visit and talk with exhibitor representatives, plan your book-shopping strategy, and meet colleagues before dinner!


THURSDAY, March 31
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Immigration and Ethnic History Society (IEHS)

Dessert Before Dinner

The Immigration and Ethnic History Society invites attendees to the annual reception for graduate students and early career scholars. The IEHS promotes the study of the history of immigration and the study of ethnic groups in the United States, including regional groups, Native Americans, and forced immigrants.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
3:30 pm–5 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)

LAWCHA Reception 

Join LAWCHA for an afternoon of lively solidarity and collegiality with scholars and activists at our annual membership meeting and reception. Hear what LAWCHA has been doing, celebrate with travel grant and award recipients, and share your ideas for future activities. The event will begin at 1:30 pm with an address by LAWCHA President Will Jones, titled, " The Essential Worker: A History from the Progressive Era to COVID-19," with responses from Emma Amador, Keona Ervin, Jennifer Klein, and Gabriel Winant. The reception and annual meeting will follow the talk.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

By invitation only

Distinguished Members, Donors, and Award Winners Reception

The OAH is pleased to invite our longtime members, major donors, and award winners to a special reception as a token of our appreciation for their continued support and involvement with the organization.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Contingent Faculty Reception

The Committee on Part-Time, Adjunct, and Contingent Employment (CPACE) invites you to meet committee members and to chat about issues related to non-tenure track members of the history profession, including the development of a caucus.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Graduate Students Reception

We welcome graduate students to attend this reception which offers an opportunity to share experiences and make lasting connections.  Meet with fellow attendees and representatives from the OAH.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Independent Scholars Reception

We welcome independent scholars to attend this reception which offers an opportunity to share experiences and make lasting connections. Meet with fellow attendees over bites and beverages.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

International Reception 

The OAH International Committee welcomes all conference attendees interested in faculty and student exchanges and other efforts to promote global ties among historians of the United States. 


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the OAH Committee on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Historians and Histories 

LGBTQ Reception

Please join the Committee of LGBTQ Historians and Histories for a reception at the 2022 OAH Conference on American History from 6:00–7:30 pm. The winner of the John D’Emilio Dissertation Prize will be celebrated at the reception. 


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
6 pm–7:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Sponsored by the Massachusetts Historical Society 

Offsite Event: Public History and NPS Collaboration Reception

The Massachusetts Historical Society cordially invites OAH conference attendees to a reception at 1154 Boylston Street from 6:00-7:30 p.m. on Friday, 1 April 2022. Gather with friends, enjoy drinks and hors d'oeuvres, and learn more about these this historic organization in Boston's Back Bay. 


SHGAPE Reception 

SHGAPE will host a reception for all SHGAPE members and meeting attendees interested in the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. SHGAPE was formed in 1989 to encourage innovative and wide-ranging research and teaching on this critical period of historical transformation. SHGAPE publishes the quarterly Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and awards book and article prizes for distinguished scholarship.


SATURDAY, APRIL 2
7:15 pm–8:30 pm

Open to all attendees

Phil Deloria, OAH President, Harvard UniversityOAH President's Reception

All attendees are cordially invited to the OAH President’s Closing Reception in honor of OAH President Philip J. Deloria. Please join us in thanking her for him service to the organization and the history profession following the OAH Presidential Address.


 

FRIDAY, APRIL 1
12 pm - 1:30 pm

Pre-registration required

Limited seating: 100
Cost: $65
Sponsored by the OAH Committee on the Status of Women in the Historical Profession

Women's Committee Luncheon: Picture Brides & Prostitutes: Marriage, Migration and Misogyny in the Early 20th Century

Presenter: Arissa Oh, Boston College
Chair: Mary Ann Irwin, California History

In the early decades of the twentieth century, women from Europe and Asia came to the United States to join husbands whom they had only ever seen in photographs. These so-called ‘picture brides’ were often married by proxy in their home countries before embarking and were allowed to enter the U.S. by virtue of their status as wives. But were these women wives, or prostitutes – or something else? This talk explores how Americans worked out changing ideas about marriage, gender and sexuality, and race via the figure of the immigrant bride.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
12 pm - 1:30 pm

Pre-registration required


Limited seating: 65
Cost: $65
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

SHGAPE Luncheon and Presidential Address: "Still Searching: A Black Family’s Quest for Equality and Recognition during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era"

Presenter: Albert Broussard, History at Texas A&M University

The 2022 SHGAPE Distinguished Historian, Albert Broussard, is professor of History at Texas A&M University, where he has taught since 1985. He has published numerous books, including Expectations of Equality: A History of Black Westerners (2012), Black San Francisco: The Struggle for Racial Equality in the West, 1900-1954 (1993), and African American Odyssey: The Stewarts, 1853-1963 (1998). He is currently writing a history of racial activism and civil rights in the American West from World War II to the present. He is a past president of the Oral History Association and recently served as president of SHGAPE from 2018-2020; this Distinguished Historian Address also serves as his SHGAPE Presidential Address.


SHGAPE is able to offer a limited number of luncheon tickets to graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. After you have registered for the OAH conference, please send an email to alwood@ilstu.edu before March 14 if you would like a ticket to the SHGAPE luncheon. 


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
12 pm - 1:30 pm

Pre-registration required


Limited seating: 50
Cost: Complimentary
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by the HistoryMakers

Disappearing Act: Saving Twentieth-Century African American Archives: …a Moral and Cultural Imperative

Presenters: Julieanna L. Richardson, The HistoryMakers 
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, 
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture


To register: Please RSVP to The HistoryMakers at info@thehistorymakers.org, or (312) 674-1900, no later thanMonday, March 14, 2022.

It has become a major concern that we as a nation are at risk of losing most of the significant archival documentation of 20th-century African American history and accomplishments—a fate that will severely cripple the academic study of African American history and achievement, and a slew of other disciplines that would be left without a complete record of the contributions and innovations pushed forward by African Americans. Many of the most compelling and rich sources are hidden away in the personal papers of African Americans across the country who have never been approached or made aware of the historical value these documents possess. Most U.S. repositories, libraries, archives, and historical societies are already severely underrepresented with regards to their African American collections and holdings. Society as a whole is rapidly becoming a visual culture, and an archive such as The HistoryMakers Digital Archive is committed to being the digital repository for African Americans in the digital age. Given that less than 1% of the over 3,000 accomplished and noteworthy African Americans that we have interviewed have plans for their papers, and that more than 2,000 of the interviewees are age 70 and above, the identification, preservation, documentation, and accessibility of these papers and collections is imperative not only for ensuring a more complete and accurate record of American history but also for the future of scholarship in a myriad of academic disciplines. The HistoryMakers has already assembled the nation’s—and the world’s—largest repository of 20th-century African American oral testimony, but without the support and collaboration of scholars across the globe to surround this collection with the contextual and documentary evidence necessary to provide a better picture of the history these testimonies allude to, our understanding of the past and the future will be hampered. Join The HistoryMakers founder and president, Julieanna Richardson, as she addresses the insidious issues of the lack of African American representation in the archives, as well as a road map forward toward alleviating this problem for archivists and scholars alike.


SATURDAY, APRIL 2
12 pm - 1:30 pm

Pre-registration required


Limited seating: 100
Cost: $65
Limited $45 tickets for NTT faculty/ adjuncts
Limited complimentary for graduate students

Sponsored by Al Camarillo and the OAH Committee on the Status of African American, Latino/a, Asian American, and Native American (ALANA) Historians and ALANA Histories

Al Camarillo ALANA Forum on Race and Ethnic Studies in American History: Riot or Rebellion?: The Meaning of Violent Protest from the 1960s to George Floyd

Presenter: Elizabeth Kai Hinton, Yale University

The decades since the civil rights movement are considered by many to be a story of progress toward equal rights and greater inclusiveness. Elizabeth Hinton uncovers an altogether different history, taking us on a troubling journey from Detroit in 1967 and Miami in 1980 to Los Angeles in 1992 and beyond to chart the persistence of structural racism and one its primary consequences, the so-called urban riot. Dr. Hinton offers a critical corrective: the word riot was nothing less than a racist trope applied to events that can only be properly understood as rebellions--explosions of collective resistance to an unequal and violent order. Challenging the optimistic story of the post-Jim Crow United States, Hinton's discussion will present a new framework for understanding our nation's enduring racial strife. As her history suggests, rebellions will likely continue until police are no longer called on to manage the consequences of dismal conditions beyond their control, and until an oppressive system is finally remade on the principle of justice and equality.

The OAH Committee on the Status of African American, Latino/a, Asian American, and Native American (ALANA) Historians and ALANA Histories with the support of Al Camarillo is able to offer a limited number of free lunch tickets for graduate students and $45 subsidized tickets for non-tenured track and adjunct faculty. Please email alana@oah.org before registering if you would like a ticket.


SATURDAY, APRIL 2
12 pm - 1:30 pm

Email for free tickets | Limited to 40

Sponsored by the Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600–2000 

The Women and Social Movements in the United States, 16002000 Luncheon

Presenters:
Rebecca Jo Plant and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, co-editors of Women and Social Movements in the U.S. since 1600
Joan Jensen, editor of Women and Social Movements, Development in the Global South, 1919-2019
Lisa Arellano, co-editor of Queer Pasts

The Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600–2000, an electronic journal and digital database published by Alexander Street Press and ProQuest, will be sponsoring the luncheon. 

Please join us for a complimentary lunch and to learn about the newest offerings from Alexander Street Press and ProQuest related to women’s and queer histories. The event is free, but seats are limited. 

Registration will be availble directly with ProQuest in November 2021


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
8:45 am–10:15 am
$25

Conference Kick Off Networking Breakfast

Kick off your morning, welcome back your peers, and network before the first full day. Meet up with friends and socialize, make new connections or meet a new conference-buddy! The Kick Off Breakfast will include a continental breakfast and welcoming remarks by OAH Program Committee Co-Chair Suzanne Smith, George Mason University.

Featuring CBYD, a long-standing jazz group hailing from New London, in Southeastern Connecticut. This jazz quartet is influenced by a diverse range of music outside the jazz idiom, the group enjoys the ‘spontaneous lively discussions’ expressed and experienced on the band stand.


FRIDAY, APRIL 1
8:45 am–10:15 am

First-come, first-served

Sponsored by Forrest T. Jones

Welcome Breakfast for New Members and First-Time Attendees

Begin your day with complimentary coffee and a light continental breakfast with OAH staff and leadership. Members of the OAH Membership Committee will be available to answer any questions you have on how to make the most of your Conference on American History experience and your OAH membership.


SATURDAY, APRIL 2
7:45 am–8:45 am
First-come, first-served

Sponsored by the OAH Committee on Community Colleges

Community College Historians Breakfast

Join your fellow colleagues at the twelfth annual Community College Historians Breakfast! College historians are invited to gather to network and meet with members of the OAH Committee on Community Colleges to discuss new developments in history departments at America’s community colleges.