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Call for Submissions

Process—the blog of the Organization of American Historians, The Journal of American History, and The American Historian—invites proposals and submissions from all periods and fields in American history. We welcome essays that historicize the present as well as those that explore connections to our current moment. Process features posts from all time periods of American history and a variety of fields of history. We welcome submissions from anyone engaged in the practice of U.S. history, including researchers, teachers, graduate students, archivists, curators, public historians, digital scholars, and others.

Histories of Sport

In anticipation of the upcoming 2024 Paris Summer Olympics, Process invites proposals and submissions for an upcoming series on the histories of sport in the United States. We are open to a wide range of topics and approaches. This could include pieces about sports activism and politics; the athletic field or court as a site of culture wars; sport scandals; sports and race, ethnicity, and migration; sports and queer history; Title IX and issues of gender in sports more broadly; the role of sport in international diplomacy and politics; explorations of sport and socioeconomic class and leisure; and other related topics. Submissions may also use contemporary sports issues or upcoming anniversaries as a way to explore the histories of sport in the United States.

We accept submissions from anyone engaged in the practice of U.S. history, including researchers, teachers, graduate students, archivists, curators, public historians, digital scholars, and others. Submissions should be written for a public readership and should not exceed 1500 words, not counting footnotes. We will aim to publish pieces throughout summer 2024, but are open to submissions past that point. Proposals and drafts may be sent to blog@oah.org.

Celebrating Combahee at Fifty: Black Feminism, Socialism, Race, and Sexuality

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Combahee River Collective, Process calls for proposals and submissions on a wide variety of themes surrounding feminism, socialism, race, and sexuality. The Combahee River Collective was a Black lesbian feminist socialist organization formed in 1974. Its founding and activities played an essential role in the development of theories of intersectionality and critical race theory.

We are open to a wide range of topics and approaches, directly or indirectly related to the Combahee River Collective. This could include pieces about Black lesbian feminism, second-wave feminism more broadly, gender and sexuality, or socialist movements, organizations, and politics in the 1970s beyond the Collective. We are also interested in articles that explore the development and application of theories of intersectionality and identity politics or histories of critical race theory. Submissions might examine the afterlives of the Combahee River Collective and its pedagogical, theoretical, and material implications and applications. We encourage pieces that adopt global, transnational, or comparative perspectives and that connect the history of Black radical feminism with contemporary issues in the United States.

We accept submissions from anyone engaged in the practice of U.S. history, including researchers, teachers, graduate students, archivists, curators, public historians, digital scholars, and others. Submissions should be written for a public readership and should not exceed 1500 words, not counting any footnotes. We will aim to publish pieces throughout spring 2024, but are open to submissions past that point. Proposals and drafts may be sent to blog@oah.org.

U.S. Intervention in Latin America

To reflect on the fiftieth anniversary of the 1973 Chilean coup, and the U.S. role in Latin America more broadly, Process invites proposals and submissions for an upcoming series on U.S. intervention in Latin America.

We are open to a wide variety of themes relating to the histories of the United States in Latin America, including forms and methods of U.S. imperialism, transregional solidarities and activisms, and historical interpretations of contemporary developments. Submissions might explore U.S.–Latin American relations and diplomacy, examine challenges to different forms of colonialism and the meanings of sovereignty, or interrogate the nature of U.S. empire in the region in any time period. We encourage pieces that engage in global, transnational, or comparative perspectives, that critically examine definitions of intervention and empire, and that intersect with issues of race, gender, sexuality, culture, sovereignty, the environment, technology, migration, or politics. We accept submissions from anyone engaged in the practice of U.S. history, including researchers, teachers, graduate students, archivists, curators, public historians, digital scholars, and others.

Submissions should be written for a public readership and should not exceed 1500 words. We will look to publish pieces in late 2023, but are open to submissions past that point. Send proposals and drafts to blog@oah.org.

Histories of Political Protest in the United States

Process invites proposals and submissions for an upcoming series on protests in U.S. history. We are open to a variety of themes relating to the histories of political protest in the United States. This could include a wide-range of protest movements, from the marches and picket lines for women’s suffrage to protests over military drafts, the “sip-ins” in Greenwich Village to the Stonewall Uprising in the summer of 1969. Articles could be centered around boycotts and sit-ins during the Civil Rights movement, protests over the Vietnam War, or more recent protest movements such as Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter.

We are also interested in articles that reveal the diverse forms that protests have taken in U.S. history, from traditional picket lines to marches, civil disobedience, riots, boycotts, lawsuits, artistic, and everyday forms of protest that often go unnoticed. We encourage pieces that engage in global, transnational, or comparative perspectives and consider political protest across and beyond borders. We accept submissions from anyone engaged in the practice of U.S. history, including researchers, teachers, graduate students, archivists, curators, public historians, digital scholars, and others.

Submissions should be written for a public readership and should not exceed 1500 words. We will look to publish pieces in late 2023, but are open to submissions past that point. Send proposals and drafts to blog@oah.org.

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