News in American History

NEH Summer Institute "Making Modernism: Literature and Culture in Chicago, 1893-1955"

"Making Modernism: Literature and Culture in Chicago, 1893-1955"
NEH Summer Institute for College and University Faculty at the Newberry Library

Application Deadline: March 1, 2019 (applicants will be notified on March 29, 2019)
Institute: July 8- August 3, 2019
Stipend: $3,300

What is Chicago's contribution to the modernist movement? This institute will explore Chicago's distinct literary and artistic culture as well as the city's connections to other modernist metropoles. We will consider the dominant styles and guiding aesthetics that characterize Chicago from the turn of the century through the aftermath of the Second World War, asking how Chicago's cultural output during these decades is connected more broadly to transatlantic modernism. The institute will begin by studying the persistent cultural resonances of the 1893 World's Fair, which gave rise to many of the city's key cultural institutions, clubs, and smaller arts organizations. We will then explore what scholars have called the "Chicago literary renaissance" of the 1910s and 1920s, particularly the work of writers who challenged the subjects and styles of a genteel literary tradition. We will look at the interracial collaborations supported by the Works P rogress Administration in Chicago during the Great Depression, considered the beginning of the Chicago Black Renaissance, a period from the 1930s through the early 1950s which has inspired a rapidly growing body of scholarship. An important goal of the institute is to develop an expansive understanding of literary history that brings together Modernist Studies and African American Studies.

Each week of the institute will include site visits to Chicago museums, clubs, neighborhoods, landmarks, or archives, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Arts Club, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum and the South Side Community Art Center. There also will be an organized trip to the Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature at the Carter G. Woodson Library, the oldest and largest African American Studies repository in the Midwest.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 29, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


The University of Virginia announces 2019-2020 Postdoctoral Fellowship

The University of Virginia’s Religious Studies Department invites applications for one full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate and Lecturer for the 2019-2020 academic year.

The anticipated start date is August 25, 2019.

Applications are welcome from any whose work bears on American religious history, thought or practice. Preference will be given to those applicants with interest in marginal or newer religious movements, especially Mormonism. Expertise in Mormonism is not required. Rather, the Fellowship is designed to provide training for persons who wish to add such expertise to an existing disciplinary specialty.

Duties include, but are not limited to, teaching three courses over the two-semester term of the fellowship. Specifically, the Fellow will teach two seminars in his or her discipline and on topics of his or her choice. In addition, the Fellow will team-teach, with the Richard Lyman Bushman Professor of Mormon Studies, an introductory survey on Mormonism in relation to American culture. Applicants should evidence experience in and commitment to undergraduate and graduate teaching in a liberal arts framework, and be prepared to participate in both a large team-taught introductory-level class and smaller upper-level courses.

Applicants for the fellowship must have attained their PhD by the appointment start date.
To apply, visit Jobs@UVA and search on Posting Number 0624485. Complete a Candidate Profile online and electronically attach a cover letter, a current CV, contact information for three references, and a teaching statement describing, in no more than 300 words, your qualifications for and philosophy of teaching with attention to your disciplinary approach.

Compensation for this appointment will be in the form of a competitive salary with full-time benefits and includes a $3,000 research fund.

For full consideration apply by February 15, 2019; however, the position will remain open until filled.

Questions regarding the position should be directed to: Kathleen Flake, Richard Lyman Bushman Professor of Mormon Studies, kathleen.flake@virginia.edu.

Questions regarding the application process in Jobs@UVA should be directed to: Richard Haverstrom at rkh6j@virginia.edu.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: November 29, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Phillips Library announces Malamy Fellowship

The Phillips Library is pleased to announce the availability of a Frances E. Malamy fellowship for 2019. All application materials, including references, must be received by 11:59pm on January 15, 2019. All materials may be submitted electronically to research@pem.org or via post to the Library Fellowship Committee at 306 Newburyport Turnpike, Rowley, MA 01969. Please ensure your application includes specific references to Phillips Library collection material, as found through our online catalog.

About the Felllowship

One recipient will be awarded the Frances E. Malamy Fellowship to perform independent scholarly research at the library within an 8 to 12 week time-frame between March 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019. Research must include use of archival materials held at the Phillips Library, and/or archiving activities under the direction of the Phillips Library staff.

The Phillips Library requests the Malamy Fellow to submit a summary of their research for the benefit of museum staff and the public. The format of this summary is negotiable. Recipients are also solicited to submit copies of any publication that results from their research to the institution.

The recipient will receive a $5,500 award, payable in two equal installments, at the middle and conclusion of his/her residency. This fellowship does not include housing. Research for this fellowship will be carried out at 306 Newburyport Turnpike, Rowley, MA 01969.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 15, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Archie K. Davis Fellowships Available From North Caroliniana Society

To encourage more extensive and intensive research in North Carolina’s historical and cultural resources, the North Caroliniana Society offers on a competitive basis Archie K. Davis Fellowships to assist scholars in gaining access to collections. Stipends vary and are intended to cover travel expenses while fellows conduct research in North Caroliniana. The annual deadline for proposals is March 1.

Please email jasont@unc.edu for more detailed instructions.

Posted: November 15, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


NEH Summer Institute - Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

Join us for this in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. This four-week NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers will bring the rich and diverse histories of America’s public museums into wider use for teaching and research in the humanities. The Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy, sustainability, and cultural heritage.

The Institute will be co-directed by Professor Karen Bassi, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and Dr. Gretchen Henderson, Georgetown University and UCSC. Weekly lectures and seminars will be led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today.

Individuals selected to participate will receive a $3,300 stipend. These taxable stipends are intended to help cover travel expenses to and from the project location, books and other research expenses, and living expenses for the duration of the period spent in residence at Georgetown University.

Application Deadline is March 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 13, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: 2019 Florida Conference of Historians

The Florida Conference of Historians (FCH) invites proposals for its 59th annual meeting on February 22-23, 2019 at New College of Florida, located in beautiful Sarasota. Faculty, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome. The organization's name reflects the geographic location of its annual meeting and does not reflect any limitation on subject matter. Organizers are accepting proposals on any and all areas of historical inquiry in the following categories: Individual papers, Panels, Posters, and Media/Film

Important Deadlines:
Proposals are due by December 15, 2018 (new extended deadline!)
Hotel reservations at the conference rate are due by January 15, 2019
Advance registration deadline is February 15, 2019

Those who present individual papers at the annual meeting may submit their work to the FCH Annals: Journal of the Florida Conference of Historians, the organization's peer-reviewed journal. Papers published in the journal are eligible to compete for prizes in several categories: the Thomas M. Campbell Award (professional level, including faculty and independent scholars), the Blaine T. Blaine Browne Award (graduate student level), and the J. Calvitt Clarke III Award (undergraduate student level). The FCH annual meeting also features several special events, such as local tours, a poster session, film screenings, a banquet, and a keynote address. Attending the sessions is free and open to the public!

Hosted by New College of Florida, the annual meeting provides a unique opportunity to explore Florida's southwest region and participate in one of the nation’s most rewarding regional history conferences!

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 12, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Labour in History & Economics Conference Call for Papers

The transformation of work and concepts of labour, the movement of workers within and between countries, and changes in how people obtain work are significant trends in many contemporary economies. While they may appear to be new developments, these processes have historical roots and precedents. With the increasing use of historical data in economics and the return of labour to the forefront of economic history, the time is ripe for discussion and collaboration between labour historians, economic historians, and labour economists.

The empirical turn in economics has led to new research related to labour and work including the use of historical case studies. At the same time, the high-wage economy interpretation of the Industrial Revolution has put workers and wages at the forefront of economic history, and historians of capitalism have advanced the importance of labour repression, especially slavery, as a cause of modern economic growth. The Oxford Conference on Labour in History and Economics will bring together scholars from these disciplines to share research, perspectives, and methodologies.

We seek papers that speak to both the scholar’s discipline and to colleagues in the other disciplines, preferably touching on the themes of migration, regulation, and the work environment. For example, we hope to see papers from economists which use historical data or engage themes relevant to economic history and/or labour history. Economic history papers may use econometric and/or qualitative methods to link with either or both of the other disciplines. Submissions on labour history might incorporate ideas from labour economics and economics more generally, or speak to persistent themes in the social sciences. Papers that discuss issues of intersectionality, including race, gender, and class, are encouraged, and we welcome submissions that study female, child, and non-white labourers.

Scholars interested in presenting at the conference are asked to send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a brief (1–2 page) CV to oxfordlabourconference@gmail.com by 14 December 2018. Co-authored papers are welcomed, and we strongly encourage submissions from graduate students and researchers from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. The conference will be held in Oxford, UK from April 15–16, 2019.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 8, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Missouri Humanities Symposium: Humanities & Democracy

Humanities & The Future Symposium: Humanities and Democracy
The Missouri Humanities Council
Friday, March 22

CFP Submission deadline: Friday, December 7.

How do the Humanities help us to understand Democracy? The Missouri Humanities Council will be holding its second annual Midwest “Humanities & The Future” Symposium to explore this question. Symposium events will take place at Drury University in Springfield, Missouri on Friday, March 22 & Saturday, March 23. All panels will take place on Friday, March 22.

We are seeking papers for three panels that will take place on Friday, March 22. Each interdisciplinary panel in the Humanities will be devoted to one of three themes: 1) Rights, 2) Conflict, and 3) Negotiation.

We are at the cusp of a series of historical markers for democracy nationally, globally, and here in the Midwest. The year 2019 will mark 100 years since the Treaty of Versailles and the formation of the League of Nations. The following year, 2020, will mark the centennial for Women’s Suffrage. The two-hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the twenty-fourth state to enter the United States will take place in 2021. Finally, in just a few years, in 2024, we will come to the one-hundred-year anniversary of 1924 Indian Citizenship Act, a year that will also mark the sixty-year anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. These anniversaries serve as key reminders that democracy is a process, one that is always in motion, sometimes fraught, often exciting, and always in need of collaborative thinking.

Humanities & The Future will gather people from the Midwest who work in, study, and teach the Humanities to think anew about how the Humanities help us to understand democracy both locally and globally. How might we engage with memoir, film, historical novels, historical documents, speeches, and famous debates both in the past and now to help us better understand the ways in which democracies can, do, and should work? How do records of the human experience, in a wide array of forms, help us to imagine past key historical moments and possible new futures for democracy? We welcome submissions from across the Humanities that deal with a broad range of texts and ideas related to Rights, Conflict, and Negotiation in the context of democracy.

To submit an abstract for consideration, please follow these guidelines:
• Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words
• In the beginning of your abstract, include an overview of the subject of study in your paper
• Keep in mind that the audience for this event will be mixed: students, faculty, those who work in Humanities professions, and interested members of the public are invited to attend the Symposium
• Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes
• Include a one-page CV
• Send your abstract and CV to Dr. Katie Gilbert at katie@mohumanities.org
• Submission deadline is Friday, December 7.

Note: The Missouri Humanities Council is able to assist with travel costs for panelists. We are also able to pay a $100 honorarium for your work.

The keynote speaker for the Symposium is Dr. John Inanzu, Sally D. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Law & Religion at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches criminal law, religion and law, and various First Amendment courses. He writes and speaks frequently to general audiences on topics of pluralism, assembly, free speech, religious freedom, and other issues.

Inazu is the author of Liberty's Refuge: The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly (Yale, 2012) and Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference (Chicago, 2016).

The Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri is a co-sponsor of this year’s keynote address.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Funding to attend Vernacular Architecture Forum, Philadelphia, 2019: Students

AMBASSADOR AWARDS: The VAF Ambassador Awards provide funding for student groups (undergraduate and graduate) from North American institutions, with a faculty sponsor, to attend VAF's annual conference.

A selection committee will choose winning recipients based on the strength of the proposals, considering especially the goals of the award program outlined above. The amount of money awarded to each program is at the discretion of the selection committee, but shall depend on such factors as the distance needed to travel to the annual conference site, the number of students involved, the number of Award applicants, and the funds available to the Award program. The total Award amount per institution is limited to $2500 with a maximum of $500 per student. We encourage, but do not require, that Ambassadors apply for matching funds from their institutions.

During the conference, Award recipients are encouraged to use social media to communicate with a broader audience about their experiences as a participant in the conference. Following conference attendance, Award recipients are expected to act as "ambassadors" for the VAF, working to promote the study, documentation, and preservation of ordinary buildings and landscapes. Each group of Ambassadors must also submit a written summary of its experiences to the fellowship chair. The summary, as well as a group photograph, will be published in the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s newsletter. Schools awarded an Ambassadors Award in 2011 or thereafter will not be eligible for an award the following academic year.

For application instructions please click here>>

DEADLINE FOR 2019: JANUARY 5, 2019

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Grants


Funding to attend Vernacular Architecture Forum, Philadelphia, 2019: First Time Attendee

ACCESS AWARD: In an effort to bring fresh voices to the study of vernacular buildings and landscapes the Access Award supports first-time attendance by scholars and students with limited professional exposure to the fields of architectural history and vernacular studies, as well as by practitioners and independent scholars in the field. The next meeting, Landscapes of Succession, will take place in Philadelphia, PA, May 29 - June 1, 2019.

There is no geographic restriction on the award and local practitioners, scholars, and students may apply. Winners are not required to give a paper at the meeting, although they may. The award will cover the cost of registration for the conference including tours. Winners who live more than 50 miles from the conference site will also receive a stipend of $300 for travel and lodging, to be presented at the conference. Up to two awards will be given per year. Winners are required to write an article to be published in the VAF’s newsletter, VAN, discussing what they learned as first-time attendees.

The deadline for applications is January 5, 2019.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Grants