News in American History

Symposium: "Pre-Columbian & Early Colonial Florida" (Oct 27-28)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The History Council is hosting a symposium in St. Petersburg on October 27-28 that will feature many experts on Florida as it existed before and during the time of the first contact by Europeans with Native Americans.

Topics will include Native Americans of Pre-Columbian Florida; the wildlife, flora, fauna, and coastal geography of the area during the Pre-Columbian and “first contact” periods, and early attempts at settlement and exploration of the Florida west coast.

WHAT: The west coast of Florida, from Charlotte Harbor to Tampa Bay, are the sites of the first exploration and settlement attempts by Europeans in the New World. From Juan Ponce de León’s discovery of the Florida west coast in 1513, to his settlement attempt in 1521, to the Narváez Expedition in 1528, to the Hernando de Soto Expedition of 1540, little is known about where their landings in “La Florida” occurred, and little is known of the Native Americans who were here at the time. The symposium will include presentations and introduce new research, to help us to understand more about the people who came here, the people who lived here at the time, and where the explorer’s excursions took them.

WHEN: Saturday, October 27 and Sunday, October 28

WHERE: St. Petersburg Yacht Club, with visits to: The Anderson/Narváez Site (Jungle Prada Archaeological Site), and The James Museum of Western and Wildlife Art (opened May 2018); St. Petersburg Hilton has discounted rooms for symposium registrants.

WHO: Hosted by The History Council; Open to public (limited tickets available)

Speakers include Sterling Professor Rolena Adorno of Yale University; Professor Emeritus Jerald Milanich of the University of Florida; Chair and Professor J. Michael Francis of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg; Professor Emeritus Barbara Purdy of the University of Florida; Professor Emeritus Martin Favata of the University of Tampa; Professor Ping Wang of the University of South Florida; and Professor Emeritus Al Hine of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

Tickets and further information are available at HistoryCouncil.org.

Posted: October 17, 2018
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


Cornell University College of Human Ecology History of Home Economics Fellowship

The College of Human Ecology at Cornell University is accepting applications for the 2019 Dean's Fellowship in the History of Home Economics.

We invite faculty members, research scholars, and advanced graduate students (must be eligible to work in the United States) with demonstrated background and experience in historical studies to apply for this post-graduate opportunity. The fellowship recipient will receive an award of $6,500 for a summer or sabbatical residency of approximately six weeks to use the unique resources available from the College and the Cornell University Library system in pursuit of scholarly research in the history of Home Economics and its impact on American society.

At the conclusion of the residency the fellowship recipient will provide a final report to the dean, including a bibliography of research pursued, and preservation recommendations for pertinent library and archival holdings. In addition, the recipient will be invited to give a public presentation on their research at a later date. Research projects should be intended for publication.

Relevant historical subject areas may include, but are not limited to: the role of women in the family and society, the history of women in higher education, the history of food, nutrition, housing, consumer economics, the family, child development, design, clothing and textiles among other key topics in American social history. We welcome applications in which the historical subject area may inform the investigation of contemporary societal issues.

The deadline for receipt of all application materials is Friday, March 1, 2019.

For futher information, click here>>

Please circulate this announcement to your professional networks.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Call for Nominations: SHFG 2019 John Wesley Powell Prize (Historical Display Projects)

The Society for History in the Federal Government's John Wesley Powell Prize for Historic Preservation and Historical Display annually honors distinction by an individual or principal collaborators for a single historical display/interpretation project, or historic preservation project completed in the last two years. The award is given for any form of interpretive historical presentation including, but not limited to, museum exhibits, interpretive media products, or programs; or to any project involving the preservation of records, artifacts, buildings, historical sites, and other historical entities. The prize rotates annually between projects of historical display/interpretation (awarded in odd years) and those of historic preservation (awarded in even years). The deadline for the current call for historical display projects is November 16, 2018.

The Powell Prize commemorates the explorer and federal administrator whose work demonstrated early recognition of the importance of historic preservation and historical display.

Eligibility

The prize will be conferred on a project created by any agency or unit of the federal government. Nongovernmental organizations, including federal contractors, who performed eligible activities on behalf of a unit of the federal government will also be considered. Projects may be renominated, as long as the renomination includes a description of any updates since the original nomination.

Eligible projects include, but are not limited to, the following:

Historical Display/Interpretation (odd years)
• Exhibits – in museums, cultural centers, and other public venues;
• Public Interpretive Programs – lecture series, walking tours, oral history projects, outreach activities, educational offerings, workshops, etc.;
• Major Initiatives – anniversary projects, agency initiatives, commemorative projects

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


New York State Archives Research Travel Grants

Larry J. Hackman Research Residency

Deadline January 15, 2019

The Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Program supports advanced work on New York State history, government, or public policy with grants to qualified applicants to defray travel-related expenses for on-site research at the New York State Archives in Albany, NY.

In honor of the bicentennial of the construction of the Erie Canal, the State Archives invites researchers to apply with a research focus on the history of New York’s canal system. For a detailed guide to our records on the Erie Canal, go to The Mighty Chain: A Guide to Canal Records in the New York State Archives.

Previous Residents have included academic and public historians, graduate students, independent researchers and writers, and primary and secondary school teachers. Residencies range from a few days to several weeks depending upon the nature of the research and volume of records consulted.

Contact the Archives Researcher Services staff to discuss your research topic and the records you propose to use: archref@nysed.gov or 518-474-8955.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Grants


CFA: Blacks on the Left Symposium

The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (Rose Library) at Emory University is pleased to announce the symposium, “Blacks on the Left" (May 31-June 1, 2019).

The Rose Library is home to one of the world’s premier archives of African American History and Culture. For 21 years we have documented hundreds of individuals and organizations, resulting in the preservation of over 5,000 linear feet of manuscripts and 13,000 print titles. Included in our holdings are the papers of Louise Thompson Patterson (1901-1999) and Matt (1903-1996) and Evelyn Crawford (1899-1972), who were prominent African American Communists in the Harlem Renaissance era. This symposium will be held in honor of their contributions to American life and letters.

In this spirit, we invite proposals for papers that will illuminate the braided histories of struggles against racism, state violence, and capitalism alongside the individuals and organizations that engaged in those conflicts. ‘Blacks on the Left’ is a symposium that we hope can bring together a variety of disciplines that document the role of left-wing anti-capitalist politics in struggles for black liberation. (Or, for that matter, cases in which these forces part ways.)

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: identity, liberation, struggle, political motives and commitments, contradictions, intersections, relevance/irrelevance, and the notion of “blackness” in activism.

The submission deadline is December 1, 2018. Proposals for individual papers should be limited to 500 words. Proposals for organized panels should be limited to 500 words for each speaker, plus a 300 word abstract addressing the overall themes and goals of the panel.

To submit, use the form at the bottom of the symposium site: Click here>>

Graduate students are encouraged to submit; two sessions will be reserved for students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program.

Notifications of acceptance will be sent January 2, 2019.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCPH Award Program

NCPH awards recognize excellence in the diverse ways public historians apply their skills to the world around us. The purpose of the award program is to promote professionalism and best practices among public historians and to raise awareness about their activities.

Submissions for the Book Award and Kelley Award are due November 1; the Outstanding Public History Project Award, New Professional Award, Excellence in Consulting, and Robinson Prize for Historical Analysis are due December 1; and student awards are due January 1.

Help us acknowledge extraordinary work by nominating yourself or a colleague.

for a full list of awards and submission details, click here>>

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Awards and Prizes


In Memoriam: Ronald Hoffman (1941-2018)

Ronald Hoffman, who retired as Director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture and Professor of History at William & Mary in 2013, passed away on September 4th.
He is survived by his partner, Sally Mason; his daughter and son-in-law, Maia Hoffman and Avi Melamed; his son and daughter-in-law, Barak Hoffman and Dora Lemus; and his sister, Joanne Giza.

A distinguished scholar of the American Revolution, author or editor of dozens of books, and the editor of the Papers of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence and the last of the signers to die, Dr. Hoffman was the seventh, and longest serving, Director of the Omohundro Institute.
A member of the OAH Distinguished Lectureship program, he taught at the University of Maryland, College Park (1969-1994) and, parallel to his appointment at the OI, was Professor of History at William & Mary (1992-2013).

For further information, click here>>

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: In Memoriam


Loring Fellowship on the Civil War

The Boston Athenaeum and the Massachusetts Historical Society will offer one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, its Origins, and Consequences for at least four weeks at each institution. This fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000. The Loring application deadline is February 15, 2019.

The recipient will conduct research for at least four weeks at each institution. The Athenaeum’s Civil War collections are anchored by its holdings of Confederate states imprints, the largest in the nation, consisting of books, maps, broadsides, sheet music, government documental publications, and other materials organized according to the Parrish & Willingham bibliography. The Society’s manuscript holdings on the Civil War are particularly strong. They include, for instance, diaries, photographs, correspondence from the battlefield and the home front, papers of political leaders, materials on black regiments raised in Massachusetts, and extensive holdings on the U.S. Sanitary Commission. The Athenaeum and the Society are especially interested in projects for which both repositories’ resources are vital. Each institution will automatically refer unsuccessful proposals to its short-term fellowship competition.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


New England Regional Fellowship Consortium Grants

The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC), a collaboration of twenty-seven major cultural agencies, will offer at least twenty awards in 2019-2020. Each grant will provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research at three or more participating institutions between June 1, 2019, and May 31, 2020.

Two new institutions joined the Consortium this past year: the Chapin Library at Williams College, and the University of Vermont Special Collections! The full list of participating institutions is below.

Participants include: Baker Library, Harvard Business School; Boston Athenæum; Boston Public Library, Norman B. Leventhal Map Center; John J. Burns Library, Boston College; Chapin Library, Williams College; Colonial Society of Massachusetts; Congregational Library and Archives; Connecticut Historical Society; Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine; Mary Baker Eddy Library; Harvard Law School Special Collections; Harvard University Archives; John Hay Library, Brown University; Historic Deerfield; Houghton Library, Harvard University; Maine Historical Society; Massachusetts Historical Society; Mystic Seaport; New England Historic Genealogical Society; New Hampshire Historical Society; Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education, University of Southern Maine; Rauner Special Collections Library, Dartmouth College; Rhode Island Historical Society; Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute; Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College; University of Vermont Special Coll ections; Vermont Historical Society.

Deadline: February 1, 2019.

For information on the NERFC fellowship competition and to apply online, visit www.nerfc.org. Questions? Email fellowships@masshist.org.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Fellowships


Vernacular Architecture Forum Catherine W. Bishir Prize

Does your work contribute to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes? Have you published a scholarly article on the subject in the last two years? You may be eligible for the Bishir Prize from the Vernacular Architecture Forum.

The 2019 Bishir Prize, named for longtime VAF member and influential scholar Catherine W. Bishir, will be awarded to the scholarly article published in a juried North American publication between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2018 that has made the most significant contribution to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes. Articles considered for the prize should be based on primary research, break new ground in interpretation or methodology, and contribute to the intellectual vitality of these fields. Entries may come from any discipline concerned with vernacular architecture studies.

Please note that essays published as chapters in a book are also eligible if the volume is peer-reviewed, published within the time parameters specified, and the research presented in the essay is new. Anthologized collections are not eligible.

The deadline for nominations for the 2019 Bishir Prize is February 1, 2019.

To nominate an article please submit the following:
• MS Word document providing contact information, publication data (name of book publishing company or title of journal, and date of publication), and a brief statement contextualizing the author(s) and article.
• PDF copy of the article.

Nomination materials should be submitted to Dr. Margaret Grubiak at bishirprize@vafweb.org.

For further information, Click here>>

Posted: September 28, 2018
Tagged: Awards and Prizes