News in American History

Calls for Papers

We welcome your call for proposals or papers for upcoming meetings, conferences, or writing projects within the field of US history. Please submit your announcement using this form.

CFP: Universities Studying Slavery 2019 Fall Symposium “The Academy’s Original Sin”

When: October 9–12, 2019 
Where: Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 

Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati are proud to co-sponsor the Universities Studying Slavery (USS) Fall 2019 Symposium, entitled “The Academy’s Original Sin.” USS is a multi-institutional collaborative effort working to address historical and contemporary issues dealing with race and inequality in higher education and university communities and the complicated legacies of slavery in modern American society. 

This symposium encourages collaboration among—and unites scholars from—a broad range of colleges and universities to better understand the role of enslaved people and their relation to higher education. Slavery’s legacy in the American academy is demonstrated in myriad ways, from African American access to higher education and discussions surrounding reparative justice, to racism and discrimination within academe and battles to rename places/spaces on college campuses nationwide. The Fall 2019 Symposium continues the conversation, focusing on the enslavement of people of African descent and how that enslavement manifested itself in the development of U.S. educational institutions. Moreover, it will directly question these complicated legacies. 

PANEL TOPICS 

This year’s symposium features pre-selected panel topics and participants are encouraged to submit proposals accordingly. (Symposium organizers reserve the right to include additional/alter current panels as interest dictates.) 

  • Legacies of the Middle Passage: This panel evaluates the lasting legacies of the transatlantic slave trade, focusing on a variety of responses to cultural trauma and efforts to heal and  transform. 
  • Teaching Trauma: As recent controversies have made clear, the history of slavery and the slave trade are often taught in wildly inappropriate ways in American schools. This panel explores the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to teaching this challenging material. 
  • The Ties that Bind: Histories of Religion and Race at XU and UC: This panel is exclusively designed for XU and UC faculty/administration to discuss developments on our campuses re: controversial spaces and historical legacies. 
  • Violent Evangelism: Weaponizing Faith & Teaching Place: Slaveholders and their sympathizers often defended slavery by pointing to its presence in the Bible as evidence of its place in a higher plan for social order. Interpretation of biblical stories like Cain and Abel, and that of Noah’s son Ham, offered proof that “Negroes” were accursed and their enslavement theologically condoned. This panel explores the Christianization of slaves, segregationist theology, and the ethics of disarmament. 
  • New-Age ‘Fieldwork’: Intellectual Chains of the 21st Century: Especially on large plantations, the institution of slavery created distinct occupational hierarchies, distinguishing between tradesmen, fieldworkers, house slaves (domestics, wet nurses, etc.), etc. Do academic hierarchies of the twenty-first century mimic these relationships of the past? What is the new “fieldwork” for the Diaspora, and how does the academy bridge the divide between the Ivory Tower and the local communities within which it physically stands? 
  • Legacies of Slavery: Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to present original research pursuant to the Symposium title. Potential participants are welcome to discuss their unique campus climate regarding the work of retributive justice, and to introduce the broad range of activities designed to facilitate (or hinder) and official acknowledgment of the sacrifices of black bodies for the development of the Ivory Tower
  • 40 Acres and a Myth: Union General William T. Sherman’s Special Field Order No. 15, an idea for massive land redistribution following the Civil War, is a staple of black history lessons. There are, however, numerous facets of the revolutionary idea Americans still do not understand. This panel looks to the past as a starting point for examining the concepts of social reconstruction, retributive justice, and reparations, and asks, “What contemporary concessions can/should be made to the descendants of slaves in the United States?” 
  • When Will We Be Satisfied?: Re-evaluating ‘Progress’ in a Post-King America August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech that has resonated for decades. In what has become known as the “I Have a Dream” speech, King voiced the pressing demands of the civil rights movement, and posed a challenging question regarding the supposed progress of race relations in America. This panel invites presenters to respond to King’s query, “When will we be satisfied?” and the significance of the continued phenomenon of racism in America. 
  • Global Perspectives on Retributive Justice: Retributive justice is a theory of justice that holds that the best response to a crime is a punishment proportional to the offense, inflicted because the offender deserves the punishment. With specific regard to the legacy of slavery in the United States, this panel assumes agency and communion can further understand the experiences of victims, and invites presentations that broadly address retributive justice, value restoration and procedural justice. 

Contributions from researchers in a range of disciplines from anthropology, cultural studies, history, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, urban studies and other fields are encouraged. Practitioners in cultural history institutions, and the visual and performing arts, are also encouraged to submit, as non-traditional and/or alternative forms of presenting research, e.g. in videos, visual art or performances, will be supported. 

Please email an abstract of the proposed paper/presentation (limit 500 words) and CV to USS2019XUC@xavier.edu by July 1, 2019. Presenters will be notified within two weeks if their proposal has been selected for a panel. 

The USS2019XUC Symposium registration will open on July 15, 2019

SYMPOSIUM HOTELS 

A block of rooms have been reserved under “USS 2019 Symposium” at the following locations, and all participants are invited to contact the hotels directly to confirm lodgings. The block of rooms will “close” either on September 15, 2019, or when all rooms on the block have been reserved. Blocks at both hotels are limited, so BOOK EARLY! 

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Cincinnati Uptown/University Area 
2500 S Market St, Cincinnati, OH 45219 
(513) 281-2200 
*ALL rooms/types $109* 
*STUDENT RATES available at this location for $99 (up to quadruple occupancy!), but rate must be approved/blocked by program coordinators. Preference for student rooms will be given to those presenting at the 2019 Symposium. 

Hampton Inn & Suites Cincinnati/Uptown-University Area 
3024 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH 45219 
(513) 281-2700 
*ALL room types $119/$129* 

UC and XU will provide complimentary shuttles from CVG to both hotels: 
Wednesday, October 9, from 12pm-3pm 

UC and XU will provide complimentary shuttles from Saturday morning venue to CVG: 
Saturday, October 12, from 12pm-3pm 

Rates include breakfast, a limited number of “student” rates are available directly through symposium organizers, and tax-exempt status will be recognized at either hotel ONLY IF: You supply the hotel with a hardcopy of your institution’s tax-exempt certification upon check-in AND… pay for your room with your institution’s p-card/credit card, OR pay for your room prior to your arrival with a check from your institution.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: May 8, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


NCPH 2020 Call for Proposals

The National Council on Public History is in the midst of celebrating its 40th anniversary, and we are planning on capping the party off with our 2020 Annual Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia! Interested in joining in on the fun? Consider submitting a proposal for the conference, which will run from March 18-21, 2020. Our theme for the conference is “Threads of Change,” and all proposals are due by July 15, 2019. We look forward to hearing from you!

For further information, click here>>

Posted: May 6, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: 2020 Florida Conference of Historians Annual Meeting

The Florida Conference of Historians (FCH) invites proposals for its 60th annual meeting to be held on February 28–29, 2020, at Florida Gateway College, located in Lake City. Faculty, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome. The organization's name reflects the geographic location of its annual meeting and not any limitation on subject matter. Organizers are accepting proposals on any and all areas of historical inquiry in the following categories: individual papers, panels, posters, media and film.

Proposals are due by November 15, 2019
Hotel reservations at the conference rate are due by January 21, 2020
Advance registration deadline is February 21, 2020

Those who present individual papers at the annual meeting may submit their work to the FCH Annals, the organization's peer-reviewed journal. Papers published in the journal are eligible to compete for prizes in several categories. The annual meeting also features local tours, a banquet, and a keynote address.

For further details, click here>>

Posted: April 30, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: War College of the Seven Years’ War at Fort Ticonderoga

Call for Papers
War College of the Seven Years’ War
at Fort Ticonderoga
May 15–17, 2020

In 2020 Fort Ticonderoga will open a new exhibit focusing of the institution of the militia and its development over the long 18th century. The topic prompts discussions about the role of the citizen, the subject, and the soldier in the broader Seven Years’ War. Even more than previous conflicts, the global Seven Years’ War called thousands more men into military service. The expansion of recruitment into regular, provincial, and militia service in various theatres across the globe made the impact of the war felt much more broadly as the soldiers themselves, as well as their families and communities, dealt with the impact of war. Fort Ticonderoga seeks proposals for papers broadly addressing the period of the Seven Years’ War for its Twenty-Fifth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War to be held May 15–17, 2020.

Fort Ticonderoga seeks out new research and perspectives on one of the most important military and political events of its era. We seek papers from established scholars in addition to graduate students and others that relate to the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the Seven Years’ War broadly speaking. We are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international quality of the conflict as well as representing the variety of peoples and places involved. 

We welcome interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives covering the period from the 1740s to the 1760s. Papers may include or engage:

            • Material Culture

            • Biographical Analysis

            • Campaign Histories

            • Archaeological Investigations

            • Cultural, Social, and Political Ramifications

            • Indigenous Populations


Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with partial travel reimbursement. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by June 1, 2019, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Posted: April 30, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Veterans: Enduring, Surviving, and Remembering War

Veterans: Enduring, Surviving, and Remembering War
An International Conference
September 12–13, 2019
U.S. Naval War College

In 2018, the University of Massachusetts Press launched “Veterans,” the first academic book series devoted to the postwar lives of military personnel and the enduring human consequences of war. To celebrate its launch, series editors Brian Matthew Jordan and J. Ross Dancy invite individual paper and full panel proposals for a two-day conference, to be hosted by the U.S. Naval War College, exploring veterans in history. In keeping with the goals of the series, the conference aims to build connections and foster conversations between disparate historiographies. As such, we invite historians who work on any time period or conflict to submit proposals. Paper and panel topics may include but are not limited to:

      •    Veterans as custodians of historical memory
      •    Veterans as historians, relic collectors, and autobiographers    
      •    Veterans and their struggles for benefits and recognition
      •    Medical and disability histories of veterans
      •    Veterans and politics
      •    Transitions to peacetime and civilian life
      •    Veterans and posttraumatic growth    
      •    Veterans’ fraternal organizations and culture 
      •    Veterans’ relationships with families and children 
      •    Veterans’ relationships with other generations of veterans    
      •    The socioeconomics of veteranhood    
      •    The experiences of women veterans
      •    Veteranhood and race and/or ethnicity    
      •    Veterans in historical memory
      •    Veterans engagement in and relationship to anti-war activism
      •    Methodologies for exploring veterans in history

Individual paper or full panel proposals must be submitted by June 15, 2019, and include an abstract of 300 words and one-page curriculum vitae for each presenter. Panel proposals should include a brief statement about the thrust of the session and must include a chair. All proposals including panel proposals should be submitted as single .pdf files.

Submissions and inquiries should be addressed to:
Dr. J. Ross Dancy 
Email: jeremiah.dancy@usnwc.edu
 

Posted: April 30, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Arts Special Issue: World War, Art, and Memory: 1914 to 1945

The two world wars of the first half of the twentieth century, World War I (1914–1918) and World War II (1939–1945), wrought extraordinary levels of destruction. Much of the artistic production during the period reflected grim and complicated realities, while a number of works of art of the post-war period played a role in the memorialization of the wars or served as critical commentary on the wars’ historical legacies. We are calling for article proposals that explore how art expressed the collective experience and memory of these two monumentally important global conflagrations and of conflicts that occurred in the interwar years. 

We seek articles that address the ways in which individuals, groups, and nations employed art to shape the collective memory and remembrance of these profoundly transformative conflicts. The articles can address all aspects of the visual arts in a variety of forms, including the applied arts and New Media. While the Eastern and Western fronts in Europe are expected to receive the most attention, both wars were truly global. Therefore, we welcome proposals that address any national context. In particular, we wish to explore the representation of these aspects of war: the experience of those who directly encountered battle; how imagery affected and connected those on “the home front”; how art formed evolving historical narratives of war; sites of memory and the memorialization of key people, events, and places.

To propose an article for this special issue of Arts, please send a CV, article title, and short abstract to the editor, Andrew M. Nedd, at anedd@scad.edu.

Please note that there is a two-stage submission procedure. We first collect proposals by June 15, 2019. Before August 1, we will invite selected abstracts to be submitted as full papers (max. 15,000 words) for peer review by December 1, 2019.

Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access journal published quarterly online by MDPI.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: April 30, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Chapter Proposals: “Where East Meets (Mid)West: Exploring a Regional Divide”

Volume editors seek proposals for chapters to be included in an edited collection focused on exploring the history, development, and culture of the Eastern edges of the American Midwest and the distinctions between the American East and Midwest. The volume is planned for publication by the Kent State University Press.

Proposals should explain the author’s general approach to the topic and include the sources to be consulted as well as the author’s curriculum vitae. Topics to be explored include, but are by no means limited to, historical understandings of the dividing line between the East and the Midwest; historical examples of friction between the East and the Midwest; examples of the transference of Eastern culture and institutions into the Midwest and, conversely, examples of the development of regionalist culture and institutions in the Midwest; general Midwestern resistance to “derivative” institutions and culture; historical and contemporary examples of frictions between the Midwestern “backcountry” and the Eastern seaboard; the geographical and topographical approaches to designating the East and the Midwest as distinct regions; literary or other cultural understandings of the dividing line between East/Midwest; the political distinctions between East and Midwest; descriptions of the growth of regionalist thought and practices that have contributed to a distinctive Midwestern consciousness; the regional identity of Cleveland; the attempt to embrace Eastern culture in the Midwest (e.g. Ann Arbor); the identity of borderland cities such as Pittsburgh; discussions of debates about whether Ohio is Midwestern; analyses of the real and perceived dividing line between Pennsylvania and Ohio; economic unities and frictions between the East and Midwest.

Chapter proposals will be due July 1, 2019. If a proposal is accepted, the author’s chapter will be due July 1, 2020. Final chapters should be approximately 7,500 words, including notes, and in Chicago style. The editors of the collection will be Jon K. Lauck and Gleaves Whitney.

All proposals should be sent to jlauck1941@hotmail.com

For further information, click here>>

Posted: March 19, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Ohio Valley History Conference; Contested Histories in the Public

Now in its 35th year, the Ohio Valley History Conference (OVHC) is open to historians and advanced graduate students from all time periods and specializations, including public and digital history. This year’s theme, Contested Histories in the Public, will examine the ways in which historians, public history professionals, and historical affinity organizations affectively research, interpret, and teach difficult histories. The OVHC welcomes proposals for individual papers, full panels, roundtables, and volunteers to chair panels or provide comment. Graduate students are particularly encouraged to attend and present.

The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort, Kentucky, will host the conference on October 3–5, 2019.

Possible topics can include but are not limited to:

  • Gender and Labor
  • Environmental Issues
  • Military History
  • Activism
  • Healthcare
  • Digital History
  • Race
  • U.S. History (open time period)
  • Museum Interpretation
  • Memory
  • European History (open time period)
  • Public History

Submission Process: For a panel or roundtable, please submit the panel title, a 100-word abstract of each paper, and a 1-2 page CV for each participant. For individual papers, please submit a 250-word abstract and a 1-2 page CV. Volunteers to chair sessions or provide comment should submit a 1-2 page CV indicating areas of interest and expertise. All proposals should be in a Word document and include the affiliation and contact information of each participant.

The deadline for submissions is June 15, 2019. Please send proposals to KHSpublications@ky.gov

Keynote Speaker: We are proud to announce the Friday night keynote speaker will be Dr. Hasan Kwame Jeffries from The Ohio State University. Dr. Jeffries’s research examines the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement. He is the author of the 2009 Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt, which tells the remarkable story of the African American freedom movement in Lowndes County, Alabama. Dr. Jefferies’ current book project, In the Shadow of Civil Rights, examines the black experience in New York City from 1977 to 1993. Dr. Jeffries’s has worked on several public history projects. From 2010 to 2014, he was the lead historian and primary scriptwriter for the $27 million renovation of the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis, Tennessee, the site of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He hosts the podcast “Teaching Hard History: American Slavery,” a production of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance Project.

Location and Accommodations: The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) is conveniently located in Frankfort, a short drive from airports in Louisville and Lexington. A block of rooms will be available the Capital Plaza Hotel, within walking distance of KHS. Several chain hotels are also located near the two Frankfort exits off I-64, along with a number of local Airbnbs. Visit https://history.ky.gov/ for directions to KHS.

Posted: March 19, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: U.S. Catholic Historian: U.S. Catholics and Non-Christians

CFP: U.S. Catholic Historian: U.S. Catholics and Non-Christians

For more than thirty-five years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism. An upcoming issue will address the theme of Catholics and non-Christians. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, historical studies of the following:

  • U.S. Catholics' engagement with religious traditions including Islam, Judaism, Atheism/Communism, Native American religions, etc.
  • Missionary efforts among non-Christians in the United States
  • U.S. Catholic theological engagement with non-Christian thinkers
  • Dialogues between Catholics and non-Christian groups
  • Catholic participation in the World's Parliament of Religions (1893) and similar meetings
  • Ethnic succession that has placed Catholics and non-Christians in geographic proximity to one another

Scholars considering a submission are asked to contact the editor, Fr. David Endres at DEandres@mtsm.org before preparing a contribution.

 

Approximate length is 7,000-10,000 words.

 

We ask for submissions by February 1, 2020 and look forward to hearing from potential contributors.

 

Posted: March 13, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: The New Populisms and the White Working Class

This volume seeks papers that take the concept of white working class seriously, as both category and thing-in-itself, while focusing a critical gaze on its deployment, use, and misuse.

While a majority of the United States working class did not support the Trump bid for the presidency, research indicates that in key states (Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania), white voters identified as working class formed a key part of the electoral victory for Trump. White working class voters who had voted for Obama in 2008 had, by 2016, crossed party lines in just enough numbers to affect the outcome. This has brought the use of the term white working class into the public eye, though in a blurred focus. This volume seeks to bring together scholars and activists from a wide variety of disciplines to examine and assess the terms used to describe the white working class, explore the contours of the new populism, and debate their relationship.

The concept of a white working class, as both an identifiable sub-class, and as an analytic concept, is, and should continue to be, troubling. For many scholars and researchers studying class formation, and questions of class and culture, there is an identifiable working class, understood by their position within the complex relationship of production, distribution, and consumption. Though the working class is bounded by and intertwined with race, ethnicity, and gender, class analysis in itself identifies a distinct group of people bearing similar relationships to capital. Yet the persistence of racism, inequalities of gender, sex, and race, and the magnification of xenophobia and ethnocentrism in public debate demand further reckoning with how class functions, how class identities are formed (or deformed,) and how class is represented.

This volume seeks papers that take the concept of white working class seriously, as both category and thing-in-itself, while focusing a critical gaze on its deployment, use, and misuse. We want to take the term apart, unpack its implication, understand its history, and if we are bold and creative enough, perhaps even come to a different, altered conception of this troubling and contentious phrase. The volume welcomes contributions from across the disciplines, and from a variety of ideological and analytic approaches. While the volume was inspired by events in the United States, we also welcome contributions from across the globe, particularly from non-majority white labor markets. Deadline for abstracts of no more than 500 words to wwcumich@gmail.com on March 1st; Deadline for full papers September 1st

For further details, click here>>

Posted: February 18, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: The Lost Alternatives of the 1960s

We seek to bring together scholars with diverse interests and from a variety of disciplines for a two-day conference on September 27 and 28, 2019, focusing on the ideas and legacy of the “counterculture.” The “counterculture” (defined broadly) was a formidable site of intellectual production and political debate, and an important part of the larger and longer history of twentieth-century American intellectual and political life.

We seek paper proposals on a range of topics focused on the “counterculture”: capitalism, poverty, wealth, distribution, and consumerism; race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; the environment; medicine and pharmacology; health and wellness; spaces and architecture; education, expertise, and epistemology; spirituality and religion; and politics, institutions, and governance. What did the “counterculture” seek to make or remake, and how? What did it mean to be a “participant” in the counterculture, how did “participants” see themselves and what they were doing, how was their sense of self and mission captured in the production and presentation of their books and pamphlets, and how did other parts of society see them? Were the ideas and movements of the “counterculture” a culmination or something new? What was the legacy of the ideas of the “counterculture”? How can contextualizing the “counterculture” in the social, political, and economic moment of 1968 lead to fresh scholarly interpretations?

Stewart Brand’s Whole Earth Catalog (1968), Frances Moore Lappé’s Diet for a Small Planet (1971), and the Our Bodies, Ourselves Collective’s Women and Their Bodies (1970) were three texts among many others that reflected the ideas of the “counterculture.” While we are especially interested in papers that address the three core texts—The Whole Earth Catalog, Diet for a Small Planet, and Our Bodies, Ourselves—or the themes framed by them, there is no requirement that the papers specifically address those texts.

Submission Guidelines: Please submit (A) An abstract of no more than 500 words; (B) A biography of no longer than 100 words; (C) A CV.

Proposals are due by March 4, 2019. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance status by the third week of March, 2019.

For additional details, longer description, and to submit a proposal, click here.

Posted: February 18, 2019
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: Pacific Northwest Labor History Assoc. Conference

General Strike 1919-2019 – Radicalism, Repression, and Solidarity

2019 marks the 100th anniversary of a watershed year in American and Canadian labor history, especially in the West. The year was defined by the Seattle and Winnipeg General Strikes, the Centralia Massacre, and the wave of state sponsored repression of immigrant workers during the Palmer Raids. Reflecting on these events a century later encourages us to consider the significance of radicalism as well as ways that organized labor has both enforced and overcome racial and gendered barriers to solidarity.

The Pacific Northwest Labor History Association seeks presentations performances, and papers that examine labor history of the past 100 years, especially related to: Labor Radicalis; Patriarchy and Feminism; Employer and State Repression; Racism, including White Supremacy; Immigrant Workers and Xenophobia.
Full Call for Proposals at PNLHA website.

Proposals Due by January 7, 2019.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: December 18, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Continuing the Struggle: The ILO Centenary and the Future of Global Worker Rights

Washington, DC
Updated dates: November 21-22, 2019
Call for Participants with a new submission deadline of February 1, 2019

October 29, 2019, will mark the one-hundredth anniversary of the first International Labor Conference (ILC), held in the Pan American Union Building in Washington, D.C., under the nascent International Labor Organization (ILO). This conference will mark the centenary of that watershed event. It will be both retrospective and prospective. It will look back to analyze and evaluate a century of efforts to advance workers’ rights around the globe. It will look forward to ponder the ways in which global supply chains, financialization, and the growth of the “gig” economy and other forms of non-standard work challenge the ILO system and raise questions about the very definition of employers and employees and the basis of labor relations.

The conference invites participants who can contribute to the exploration of a range of themes related to the ILO’s work. These include: Global Workers, Global Supply Chains, Global Lives, Gender, Sexuality and Labor Rights, Building Workplace Power and Global Workers' Rights.
On Shifting Ground: Labor Standards, Policy and the Future of Work.

Please send paper, presentation, or panel proposals to kilwp@georgetown.edu.
Deadline for submissions is February 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: December 11, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Journal of American History CFP: Sex, Suffrage, Solidarities: Centennial Reappraisals

The year 2020 marks the centennial anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. What are our obligations to this moment? What are the crucial questions and unresolved problems in the histories and historiographies of suffrage in the United States? The Journal of American History will observe the centennial with a sustained, multidimensional appraisal. From late 2019 through 2020, we intend to publish a variety of scholarly analyses across our many platforms. Our ambition is to foster creative thinking about the amendment, its discursive and material frameworks, and its complex, often-unanticipated legacies. Our theme for the project—Sex, Suffrage, Solidarities—is intended to provoke new questions about the amendment and the political, economic, and cultural transformations of which it has been a part.

Read more here >>

Read more >

Posted: December 4, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, News of the Organization


NEH Summer Institute - Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

Join us for this in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. This four-week NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers will bring the rich and diverse histories of America’s public museums into wider use for teaching and research in the humanities. The Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy, sustainability, and cultural heritage.

The Institute will be co-directed by Professor Karen Bassi, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and Dr. Gretchen Henderson, Georgetown University and UCSC. Weekly lectures and seminars will be led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today.

Individuals selected to participate will receive a $3,300 stipend. These taxable stipends are intended to help cover travel expenses to and from the project location, books and other research expenses, and living expenses for the duration of the period spent in residence at Georgetown University.

Application Deadline is March 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 13, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: 2019 Florida Conference of Historians

The Florida Conference of Historians (FCH) invites proposals for its 59th annual meeting on February 22-23, 2019 at New College of Florida, located in beautiful Sarasota. Faculty, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome. The organization's name reflects the geographic location of its annual meeting and does not reflect any limitation on subject matter. Organizers are accepting proposals on any and all areas of historical inquiry in the following categories: Individual papers, Panels, Posters, and Media/Film

Important Deadlines:
Proposals are due by December 15, 2018 (new extended deadline!)
Hotel reservations at the conference rate are due by January 15, 2019
Advance registration deadline is February 15, 2019

Those who present individual papers at the annual meeting may submit their work to the FCH Annals: Journal of the Florida Conference of Historians, the organization's peer-reviewed journal. Papers published in the journal are eligible to compete for prizes in several categories: the Thomas M. Campbell Award (professional level, including faculty and independent scholars), the Blaine T. Blaine Browne Award (graduate student level), and the J. Calvitt Clarke III Award (undergraduate student level). The FCH annual meeting also features several special events, such as local tours, a poster session, film screenings, a banquet, and a keynote address. Attending the sessions is free and open to the public!

Hosted by New College of Florida, the annual meeting provides a unique opportunity to explore Florida's southwest region and participate in one of the nation’s most rewarding regional history conferences!

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 12, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Labour in History & Economics Conference Call for Papers

The transformation of work and concepts of labour, the movement of workers within and between countries, and changes in how people obtain work are significant trends in many contemporary economies. While they may appear to be new developments, these processes have historical roots and precedents. With the increasing use of historical data in economics and the return of labour to the forefront of economic history, the time is ripe for discussion and collaboration between labour historians, economic historians, and labour economists.

The empirical turn in economics has led to new research related to labour and work including the use of historical case studies. At the same time, the high-wage economy interpretation of the Industrial Revolution has put workers and wages at the forefront of economic history, and historians of capitalism have advanced the importance of labour repression, especially slavery, as a cause of modern economic growth. The Oxford Conference on Labour in History and Economics will bring together scholars from these disciplines to share research, perspectives, and methodologies.

We seek papers that speak to both the scholar’s discipline and to colleagues in the other disciplines, preferably touching on the themes of migration, regulation, and the work environment. For example, we hope to see papers from economists which use historical data or engage themes relevant to economic history and/or labour history. Economic history papers may use econometric and/or qualitative methods to link with either or both of the other disciplines. Submissions on labour history might incorporate ideas from labour economics and economics more generally, or speak to persistent themes in the social sciences. Papers that discuss issues of intersectionality, including race, gender, and class, are encouraged, and we welcome submissions that study female, child, and non-white labourers.

Scholars interested in presenting at the conference are asked to send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a brief (1–2 page) CV to oxfordlabourconference@gmail.com by 14 December 2018. Co-authored papers are welcomed, and we strongly encourage submissions from graduate students and researchers from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. The conference will be held in Oxford, UK from April 15–16, 2019.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 8, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Missouri Humanities Symposium: Humanities & Democracy

Humanities & The Future Symposium: Humanities and Democracy
The Missouri Humanities Council
Friday, March 22

CFP Submission deadline: Friday, December 7.

How do the Humanities help us to understand Democracy? The Missouri Humanities Council will be holding its second annual Midwest “Humanities & The Future” Symposium to explore this question. Symposium events will take place at Drury University in Springfield, Missouri on Friday, March 22 & Saturday, March 23. All panels will take place on Friday, March 22.

We are seeking papers for three panels that will take place on Friday, March 22. Each interdisciplinary panel in the Humanities will be devoted to one of three themes: 1) Rights, 2) Conflict, and 3) Negotiation.

We are at the cusp of a series of historical markers for democracy nationally, globally, and here in the Midwest. The year 2019 will mark 100 years since the Treaty of Versailles and the formation of the League of Nations. The following year, 2020, will mark the centennial for Women’s Suffrage. The two-hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the twenty-fourth state to enter the United States will take place in 2021. Finally, in just a few years, in 2024, we will come to the one-hundred-year anniversary of 1924 Indian Citizenship Act, a year that will also mark the sixty-year anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. These anniversaries serve as key reminders that democracy is a process, one that is always in motion, sometimes fraught, often exciting, and always in need of collaborative thinking.

Humanities & The Future will gather people from the Midwest who work in, study, and teach the Humanities to think anew about how the Humanities help us to understand democracy both locally and globally. How might we engage with memoir, film, historical novels, historical documents, speeches, and famous debates both in the past and now to help us better understand the ways in which democracies can, do, and should work? How do records of the human experience, in a wide array of forms, help us to imagine past key historical moments and possible new futures for democracy? We welcome submissions from across the Humanities that deal with a broad range of texts and ideas related to Rights, Conflict, and Negotiation in the context of democracy.

To submit an abstract for consideration, please follow these guidelines:
• Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words
• In the beginning of your abstract, include an overview of the subject of study in your paper
• Keep in mind that the audience for this event will be mixed: students, faculty, those who work in Humanities professions, and interested members of the public are invited to attend the Symposium
• Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes
• Include a one-page CV
• Send your abstract and CV to Dr. Katie Gilbert at katie@mohumanities.org
• Submission deadline is Friday, December 7.

Note: The Missouri Humanities Council is able to assist with travel costs for panelists. We are also able to pay a $100 honorarium for your work.

The keynote speaker for the Symposium is Dr. John Inanzu, Sally D. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Law & Religion at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches criminal law, religion and law, and various First Amendment courses. He writes and speaks frequently to general audiences on topics of pluralism, assembly, free speech, religious freedom, and other issues.

Inazu is the author of Liberty's Refuge: The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly (Yale, 2012) and Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference (Chicago, 2016).

The Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri is a co-sponsor of this year’s keynote address.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The 2019 International Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War: Call for Papers

The George Washington University Cold War Group (GWCW), the LSE IDEAS Cold War Studies Project (CWSP), and the Center for Cold War Studies (CCWS) of the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) are pleased to announce their 2019 International Graduate Conference on the Cold War, to take place at the George Washington University from 2-4 May 2019.

The conference is an excellent opportunity for graduate students to present papers and receive critical feedback from peers and experts in the field. We encourage submissions by graduate students working on any aspect of the Cold War, broadly defined. Of particular interest are papers that employ newly available primary sources or non-traditional methodologies.

To be considered, each prospective participant should submit a two-page proposal and a brief academic CV (in Word or pdf format) to Jinny Ahn at Asia@gwu.edu January 23, 2019. The subject heading should be clearly marked “Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War.” Notification of acceptance will occur by February 15.

Successful applicants will be expected to e-mail their papers (no longer than 25 pages) by March 29.

The author of the strongest paper will be awarded the Saki Ruth Dockrill Memorial Prize of £100 to be spent on books in any form. The winner will also have an opportunity to publish his or her article in the journal Cold War History.

For further information, please contact Gregg Brazinsky at brazinsk@gwu.edu.

The conference sessions will be chaired by prominent faculty members from LSE, GWU, UCSB, and elsewhere. The organizers will cover accommodation costs of admitted student participants for the duration of the conference, but students will need to cover the costs of their travel to Washington.

The website can be found here>>

Posted: October 25, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Microhisories of the Civil War Era

On the one hand, microhistories, with their focus on the small scale, have the potential to shift paradigms by revealing connections and patterns obscured by the birds-eye view. However, examining a narrow subject so deeply may also offer a window into wider society because as historian Jill Lepore puts it, “however singular a person’s life may be, the value of examining it lies not in its uniqueness, but in its exemplariness, in how that individual’s life serves as an allegory for broader issues affecting culture as a whole.” The era of the Civil War is particularly suited for such deep dives, because it so significantly redefined the nation, and because so many individuals recorded their experiences. As we continue to expand our scholarship to include the experiences of those on the margins – people, places, and events often left out of traditional narratives of the period – we must grapple with an important question: to what extent can human s ingularity illuminate universal truths? This conference will address questions both of the value of individual stories and lives for their own sake, and of how seemingly small stories can offer a richer understanding of the broad contours of this period and even shift how we understand the period at all.

We welcome papers covering the Civil War era, broadly defined. This can include the political and cultural causes of the conflict, the ways individuals experienced the war on the battlefields and on the homefront, the shape of Reconstruction, and the legacies of war and emancipation. We are particularly interested in papers that consider subjects, groups, and ideas not traditionally covered in Civil War histories. We also welcome papers considering the methodology of microhistory in the American Civil War context.

Professors Richard Bell (University of Maryland) and Judith Giesberg (Villanova University) will deliver keynote presentations.

Please submit your paper proposals (max. 500 words) as well as any questions to Caitlin Verboon (cverboon@vt.edu) by January 15, 2019. Proposals should be accompanied by a brief CV. All presenters will be asked to submit written papers in advance of the conference, and the papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume or special journal issue. This conference is sponsored by the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies (civilwar.vt.edu). A limited amount of funding to cover lodging is available for scholars without access to departmental funds. Please indicate in your application if you would like to be considered.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 24, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers