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Calls for Papers

We welcome your call for proposals or papers for upcoming meetings, conferences, or writing projects within the field of US history. Please submit your announcement using this form.

Call for Proposals: Pacific Northwest Labor History Assoc. Conference

General Strike 1919-2019 – Radicalism, Repression, and Solidarity

2019 marks the 100th anniversary of a watershed year in American and Canadian labor history, especially in the West. The year was defined by the Seattle and Winnipeg General Strikes, the Centralia Massacre, and the wave of state sponsored repression of immigrant workers during the Palmer Raids. Reflecting on these events a century later encourages us to consider the significance of radicalism as well as ways that organized labor has both enforced and overcome racial and gendered barriers to solidarity.

The Pacific Northwest Labor History Association seeks presentations performances, and papers that examine labor history of the past 100 years, especially related to: Labor Radicalis; Patriarchy and Feminism; Employer and State Repression; Racism, including White Supremacy; Immigrant Workers and Xenophobia.
Full Call for Proposals at PNLHA website.

Proposals Due by January 7, 2019. 

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: December 18, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Continuing the Struggle: The ILO Centenary and the Future of Global Worker Rights

Washington, DC
Updated dates: November 21-22, 2019
Call for Participants with a new submission deadline of February 1, 2019 

October 29, 2019, will mark the one-hundredth anniversary of the first International Labor Conference (ILC), held in the Pan American Union Building in Washington, D.C., under the nascent International Labor Organization (ILO). This conference will mark the centenary of that watershed event. It will be both retrospective and prospective. It will look back to analyze and evaluate a century of efforts to advance workers’ rights around the globe. It will look forward to ponder the ways in which global supply chains, financialization, and the growth of the “gig” economy and other forms of non-standard work challenge the ILO system and raise questions about the very definition of employers and employees and the basis of labor relations. 

The conference invites participants who can contribute to the exploration of a range of themes related to the ILO’s work. These include: Global Workers, Global Supply Chains, Global Lives, Gender, Sexuality and Labor Rights, Building Workplace Power and Global Workers' Rights.
On Shifting Ground: Labor Standards, Policy and the Future of Work.

Please send paper, presentation, or panel proposals to kilwp@georgetown.edu
Deadline for submissions is February 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: December 11, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Journal of American History CFP: Sex, Suffrage, Solidarities: Centennial Reappraisals

The year 2020 marks the centennial anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. What are our obligations to this moment? What are the crucial questions and unresolved problems in the histories and historiographies of suffrage in the United States? The Journal of American History will observe the centennial with a sustained, multidimensional appraisal. From late 2019 through 2020, we intend to publish a variety of scholarly analyses across our many platforms. Our ambition is to foster creative thinking about the amendment, its discursive and material frameworks, and its complex, often-unanticipated legacies. Our theme for the project—Sex, Suffrage, Solidarities—is intended to provoke new questions about the amendment and the political, economic, and cultural transformations of which it has been a part.

Read more here >>

Read more >

Posted: December 4, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers, News of the Organization


NEH Summer Institute - Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

Join us for this in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. This four-week NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers will bring the rich and diverse histories of America’s public museums into wider use for teaching and research in the humanities. The Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy, sustainability, and cultural heritage. 

The Institute will be co-directed by Professor Karen Bassi, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and Dr. Gretchen Henderson, Georgetown University and UCSC. Weekly lectures and seminars will be led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today. 

Individuals selected to participate will receive a $3,300 stipend. These taxable stipends are intended to help cover travel expenses to and from the project location, books and other research expenses, and living expenses for the duration of the period spent in residence at Georgetown University.

Application Deadline is March 1, 2019

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 13, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: 2019 Florida Conference of Historians

The Florida Conference of Historians (FCH) invites proposals for its 59th annual meeting on February 22-23, 2019 at New College of Florida, located in beautiful Sarasota. Faculty, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome. The organization's name reflects the geographic location of its annual meeting and does not reflect any limitation on subject matter. Organizers are accepting proposals on any and all areas of historical inquiry in the following categories: Individual papers, Panels, Posters, and Media/Film

Important Deadlines:
Proposals are due by December 15, 2018 (new extended deadline!)
Hotel reservations at the conference rate are due by January 15, 2019
Advance registration deadline is February 15, 2019

Those who present individual papers at the annual meeting may submit their work to the FCH Annals: Journal of the Florida Conference of Historians, the organization's peer-reviewed journal. Papers published in the journal are eligible to compete for prizes in several categories: the Thomas M. Campbell Award (professional level, including faculty and independent scholars), the Blaine T. Blaine Browne Award (graduate student level), and the J. Calvitt Clarke III Award (undergraduate student level). The FCH annual meeting also features several special events, such as local tours, a poster session, film screenings, a banquet, and a keynote address. Attending the sessions is free and open to the public! 

Hosted by New College of Florida, the annual meeting provides a unique opportunity to explore Florida's southwest region and participate in one of the nation’s most rewarding regional history conferences!

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 12, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Labour in History & Economics Conference Call for Papers

The transformation of work and concepts of labour, the movement of workers within and between countries, and changes in how people obtain work are significant trends in many contemporary economies. While they may appear to be new developments, these processes have historical roots and precedents. With the increasing use of historical data in economics and the return of labour to the forefront of economic history, the time is ripe for discussion and collaboration between labour historians, economic historians, and labour economists. 

The empirical turn in economics has led to new research related to labour and work including the use of historical case studies. At the same time, the high-wage economy interpretation of the Industrial Revolution has put workers and wages at the forefront of economic history, and historians of capitalism have advanced the importance of labour repression, especially slavery, as a cause of modern economic growth. The Oxford Conference on Labour in History and Economics will bring together scholars from these disciplines to share research, perspectives, and methodologies.

We seek papers that speak to both the scholar’s discipline and to colleagues in the other disciplines, preferably touching on the themes of migration, regulation, and the work environment. For example, we hope to see papers from economists which use historical data or engage themes relevant to economic history and/or labour history. Economic history papers may use econometric and/or qualitative methods to link with either or both of the other disciplines. Submissions on labour history might incorporate ideas from labour economics and economics more generally, or speak to persistent themes in the social sciences. Papers that discuss issues of intersectionality, including race, gender, and class, are encouraged, and we welcome submissions that study female, child, and non-white labourers.

Scholars interested in presenting at the conference are asked to send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a brief (1–2 page) CV to oxfordlabourconference@gmail.com by 14 December 2018. Co-authored papers are welcomed, and we strongly encourage submissions from graduate students and researchers from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. The conference will be held in Oxford, UK from April 15–16, 2019.

For further information, click here>> 

Posted: November 8, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Missouri Humanities Symposium: Humanities & Democracy

Humanities & The Future Symposium: Humanities and Democracy
The Missouri Humanities Council
Friday, March 22 

CFP Submission deadline: Friday, December 7.

How do the Humanities help us to understand Democracy? The Missouri Humanities Council will be holding its second annual Midwest “Humanities & The Future” Symposium to explore this question. Symposium events will take place at Drury University in Springfield, Missouri on Friday, March 22 & Saturday, March 23. All panels will take place on Friday, March 22.

We are seeking papers for three panels that will take place on Friday, March 22. Each interdisciplinary panel in the Humanities will be devoted to one of three themes: 1) Rights, 2) Conflict, and 3) Negotiation.

We are at the cusp of a series of historical markers for democracy nationally, globally, and here in the Midwest. The year 2019 will mark 100 years since the Treaty of Versailles and the formation of the League of Nations. The following year, 2020, will mark the centennial for Women’s Suffrage. The two-hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the twenty-fourth state to enter the United States will take place in 2021. Finally, in just a few years, in 2024, we will come to the one-hundred-year anniversary of 1924 Indian Citizenship Act, a year that will also mark the sixty-year anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. These anniversaries serve as key reminders that democracy is a process, one that is always in motion, sometimes fraught, often exciting, and always in need of collaborative thinking. 

Humanities & The Future will gather people from the Midwest who work in, study, and teach the Humanities to think anew about how the Humanities help us to understand democracy both locally and globally. How might we engage with memoir, film, historical novels, historical documents, speeches, and famous debates both in the past and now to help us better understand the ways in which democracies can, do, and should work? How do records of the human experience, in a wide array of forms, help us to imagine past key historical moments and possible new futures for democracy? We welcome submissions from across the Humanities that deal with a broad range of texts and ideas related to Rights, Conflict, and Negotiation in the context of democracy. 

To submit an abstract for consideration, please follow these guidelines:
• Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words
• In the beginning of your abstract, include an overview of the subject of study in your paper 
• Keep in mind that the audience for this event will be mixed: students, faculty, those who work in Humanities professions, and interested members of the public are invited to attend the Symposium
• Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes
• Include a one-page CV
• Send your abstract and CV to Dr. Katie Gilbert at katie@mohumanities.org 
• Submission deadline is Friday, December 7.

Note: The Missouri Humanities Council is able to assist with travel costs for panelists. We are also able to pay a $100 honorarium for your work. 

The keynote speaker for the Symposium is Dr. John Inanzu, Sally D. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Law & Religion at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches criminal law, religion and law, and various First Amendment courses. He writes and speaks frequently to general audiences on topics of pluralism, assembly, free speech, religious freedom, and other issues. 

Inazu is the author of Liberty's Refuge: The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly (Yale, 2012) and Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference (Chicago, 2016). 

The Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri is a co-sponsor of this year’s keynote address.

For further information, click here>>

Posted: November 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


The 2019 International Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War: Call for Papers

The George Washington University Cold War Group (GWCW), the LSE IDEAS Cold War Studies Project (CWSP), and the Center for Cold War Studies (CCWS) of the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) are pleased to announce their 2019 International Graduate Conference on the Cold War, to take place at the George Washington University from 2-4 May 2019.

The conference is an excellent opportunity for graduate students to present papers and receive critical feedback from peers and experts in the field. We encourage submissions by graduate students working on any aspect of the Cold War, broadly defined. Of particular interest are papers that employ newly available primary sources or non-traditional methodologies.

To be considered, each prospective participant should submit a two-page proposal and a brief academic CV (in Word or pdf format) to Jinny Ahn at Asia@gwu.edu January 23, 2019. The subject heading should be clearly marked “Graduate Student Conference on the Cold War.” Notification of acceptance will occur by February 15.

Successful applicants will be expected to e-mail their papers (no longer than 25 pages) by March 29.

The author of the strongest paper will be awarded the Saki Ruth Dockrill Memorial Prize of £100 to be spent on books in any form. The winner will also have an opportunity to publish his or her article in the journal Cold War History.

For further information, please contact Gregg Brazinsky at brazinsk@gwu.edu.

The conference sessions will be chaired by prominent faculty members from LSE, GWU, UCSB, and elsewhere. The organizers will cover accommodation costs of admitted student participants for the duration of the conference, but students will need to cover the costs of their travel to Washington.

The website can be found here>>

Posted: October 25, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Microhisories of the Civil War Era

On the one hand, microhistories, with their focus on the small scale, have the potential to shift paradigms by revealing connections and patterns obscured by the birds-eye view. However, examining a narrow subject so deeply may also offer a window into wider society because as historian Jill Lepore puts it, “however singular a person’s life may be, the value of examining it lies not in its uniqueness, but in its exemplariness, in how that individual’s life serves as an allegory for broader issues affecting culture as a whole.” The era of the Civil War is particularly suited for such deep dives, because it so significantly redefined the nation, and because so many individuals recorded their experiences. As we continue to expand our scholarship to include the experiences of those on the margins – people, places, and events often left out of traditional narratives of the period – we must grapple with an important question: to what extent can human s ingularity illuminate universal truths? This conference will address questions both of the value of individual stories and lives for their own sake, and of how seemingly small stories can offer a richer understanding of the broad contours of this period and even shift how we understand the period at all.

We welcome papers covering the Civil War era, broadly defined. This can include the political and cultural causes of the conflict, the ways individuals experienced the war on the battlefields and on the homefront, the shape of Reconstruction, and the legacies of war and emancipation. We are particularly interested in papers that consider subjects, groups, and ideas not traditionally covered in Civil War histories. We also welcome papers considering the methodology of microhistory in the American Civil War context.

Professors Richard Bell (University of Maryland) and Judith Giesberg (Villanova University) will deliver keynote presentations.

Please submit your paper proposals (max. 500 words) as well as any questions to Caitlin Verboon (cverboon@vt.edu) by January 15, 2019. Proposals should be accompanied by a brief CV. All presenters will be asked to submit written papers in advance of the conference, and the papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume or special journal issue. This conference is sponsored by the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies (civilwar.vt.edu). A limited amount of funding to cover lodging is available for scholars without access to departmental funds. Please indicate in your application if you would like to be considered.

For futher information, click here>>

Posted: October 24, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFA: Blacks on the Left Symposium

The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (Rose Library) at Emory University is pleased to announce the symposium, “Blacks on the Left" (May 31-June 1, 2019). 

The Rose Library is home to one of the world’s premier archives of African American History and Culture. For 21 years we have documented hundreds of individuals and organizations, resulting in the preservation of over 5,000 linear feet of manuscripts and 13,000 print titles. Included in our holdings are the papers of Louise Thompson Patterson (1901-1999) and Matt (1903-1996) and Evelyn Crawford (1899-1972), who were prominent African American Communists in the Harlem Renaissance era. This symposium will be held in honor of their contributions to American life and letters.

In this spirit, we invite proposals for papers that will illuminate the braided histories of struggles against racism, state violence, and capitalism alongside the individuals and organizations that engaged in those conflicts. ‘Blacks on the Left’ is a symposium that we hope can bring together a variety of disciplines that document the role of left-wing anti-capitalist politics in struggles for black liberation. (Or, for that matter, cases in which these forces part ways.)

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: identity, liberation, struggle, political motives and commitments, contradictions, intersections, relevance/irrelevance, and the notion of “blackness” in activism.

The submission deadline is December 1, 2018. Proposals for individual papers should be limited to 500 words. Proposals for organized panels should be limited to 500 words for each speaker, plus a 300 word abstract addressing the overall themes and goals of the panel.

To submit, use the form at the bottom of the symposium site: Click here>>  

Graduate students are encouraged to submit; two sessions will be reserved for students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program.

Notifications of acceptance will be sent January 2, 2019.

Posted: October 16, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Papers: Australian and New Zealand American Studies Association Conference

The University of Auckland, New Zealand

14-16 July 2019

The 2019 ANZASA conference committee welcomes proposals for individual papers or panel sessions on the conference theme of community, conflict, and “the meaning of America” as well as on any topics in American Studies and related fields, including US culture, history, literature, media, politics, and foreign policy or where the United States figures in a global or transnational context. 

The deadline for proposals is 15 January 2019, but we will be reviewing proposals as they are submitted and providing timely responses to aid advance planning and preparations. All proposals must include the presenter’s name, e-mail address, and affiliation; an abstract of 250 words; and a brief biography of 250 words. For panel session proposals, please provide the session organizer’s name, e-mail address, and affiliation; a title for the panel; an abstract of 250 words for the session as a whole; and relevant information for each presenter.

Please submit your proposals as well as any questions to Jennifer Frost, Associate Professor of History, The University of Auckland, j.frost@auckland.ac.nz.

For more information click here>>>

Posted: September 11, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


From ‘Holocaust by Bullets’ to Auschwitz: Regional Dimensions of the Final Solution

CALL FOR PAPERS: The conference aims to attract students and scholars with new ideas, new perspectives, and creative approaches toward the understanding of the Holocaust. The organizers hope to host scholarly papers as well as foster discussions between various disciplines and scholars and students. Therefore, two forums are organized through which individuals can participate in the conference: (1) paper presentations, and (2) round-table discussions. Participants are encouraged to engage in both forms of scholarly exchanges!

Please complete the form below:

Name of the presenter or registrant (include official or scientific title):

Name of the co-presenter: if any

Home Institution (university or scholarly institution):

Email Address:

Phone (optional): for emergency purposes

Title of the Presentation:

An Abstract (200 words):

Participation in Roundtable Discussions:
Participants strongly encourage to join one or several of the discussion groups which will be moderated by leading scholars.
Select from the list of themes and topics you would be interested in participating in the round-table discussions. 

Participation in Optional Trips:
Indicate if you are interested in joining in any of the optional trips organized by the conference. (see list above).

Deadline for sending a proposal, with title and abstract: February 8, 2019. Results will be announced by March 1, 2019.
Send proposals or conference registration to:
Ms. Sivan Perdue
Email: education_pro@hotmail.com
Tel: 585 (309) 1717
Website: www.frombulletstoauschwitz.com

For more information: 

http://www.frombulletstoauschwitz.com

Posted: September 6, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: U.S. Catholic Historian--Suburban Catholicism

U.S. Catholic Historian seeks submissions for a future issue on the topic of Suburban Catholicism.

Read more here about this call for submissions.

Read more >

Posted: May 31, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call for Proposals: U.S. Catholic Historian--Immigration after 1880

U.S. Catholic Historian seeks submissions for a future issue on the topic of the New Immigrants: Catholic Arrivals after 1880.

Read here for more information about this call for submissions.

Read more >

Posted: May 30, 2018
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Call For Proposals - 2019 OAH Annual Meeting

2019 OAH Annual Meeting | Philadelphia

CALL FOR PROPOSALS ARE NOW OPEN--CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT
Submissions will be accepted between November 27, 2017 and January 12, 2018

Call for Proposals

"The Work of Freedom"

NEW: Use the OAH Annual Meeting Crossroads  to find collaborators or contribute to a proposal for the 2019 OAH Annual Meeting!

From the historical profession's beginnings in the late 19th and early 20th century, freedom has been a dominant theme in research, writing, and public debates on the shape, content, and character of the American experience. Over a century of scholarship and popular discussions have illuminated topics such as the diverse struggles for freedom, the denial of freedom, the limits of freedom, the prospects of freedom, the sources of freedom, the obligations of freedom, the value of freedom, the geographies of freedom, and the meaning of freedom, to name several. Marking the 400th Anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in British North America, the theme of this program shifts the lens to the "Work of Freedom." It aims to capture the labor(s) involved in identifying and securing freedom, from the colonial era and founding of the Republic through the recent election of Donald J. Trump President of the United States.

The program committee encourages proposals focusing on research, teaching, and public education that address our theme as creatively and as broadly as possible. Our theme opens up opportunities for scholars working across a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in colonial North American and U.S. history. We are interested in proposals that probe the theme within the traditional fields of economic, political, diplomatic, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women's/gender history as well as southern, Appalachian, and western history; and the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LBGT, and queer history; environmental and public history; carceral state studies; and transnational and global studies across all fields, topics, and thematic emphases.

Moreover, we hope to take advantage of our meeting in Philadelphia, an iconic setting for struggles and debates over the question of freedom, to encourage proposals that explore the interplay of freedom's work on behalf of African Americans, the poor, workers, and other disfranchised and structurally marginalized groups since people from Africa embarked upon their journey in Jamestown four centuries ago. The committee also welcomes panels, workshops, and roundtables that employ new methodologies, particularly digital humanities technology, that transcend traditional disciplinary and geographic boundaries. Finally, the 2019 Program Committee will reinforce the OAH's ongoing commitment to diversity and inclusion along myriad lines of difference and historic inequality, including ethnic/racial, gender/sexuality, and institutional affiliation, research/teaching, among others.

 


PROPOSAL SUBMITTER RESPONSIBILITIES: Upon review of the submissions, the 2019 Program Committee will only announce a "pending acceptance" or a "rejection." If you receive a pending acceptance it is the proposal submitter's responsibility to ensure that each session participant, regardless of role, completes their speaker agreement within the requested deadline (typically July 1). Once all agreements have been completed, only then will the session be officially accepted. If the agreements are not received by the deadline, the pending acceptance is void.

The proposal submitter is also asked to inform the OAH at the close of the Annual Meeting if any session participants failed to appear without prior notification.

Please ensure each participant reads important notes prior to submission.

 


2019 OAH Annual Meeting Program Committee


Like Program Committees past, we encourage sessions in a variety of formats—traditional panels composed of three papers and a comment, but also sessions of a single paper of unusual significance with several commentators, round tables of several brief papers that explore a significant issue or assess the state of a field, workshops, and sessions devoted to teaching. A descriptive list of session formats is found below.

All sessions will be 90 minutes in length, with the exception of workshops, which may run longer.

Twenty-five minutes should be reserved for discussion.

If the proposed session takes the traditional form of a series of papers with a comment, proposers should take into account the 90-minute slot, with 25 minutes reserved for discussion, when developing the proposal.

Session Types

Please remember that all sessions except workshops are 90 minutes in length and that 25 minutes should be reserved for discussion.

Paper Session: The traditional session format, paper sessions feature a chair, three or four papers, and one or two commentators. A single paper can have one or more presenters.

Panel Discussion: Panel discussions include a group of people discussing one topic, such as a film, a new text, or a tribute to a well-known scholar. Each panelist speaks on a distinct topic relating to the session theme. These sessions include a chair, three to five panelists, and no commentator.

Roundtable Discussion: Roundtable discussions include a group of experts discussing a topic. A moderator leads the discussion, but all participants speak equally about the topic, with no distinct topic assigned to each participant. These sessions include a chair, three to five participants, and no commentator.

State of the Field: In these panels senior historians and new professionals discuss a subfield of American history in depth. These panels have one chair, two or three panelists, and no commentator. These sessions will be recorded.
 

Workshop: A workshop is a training session where the presenters work directly with participants to teach them a new skill or concept. Workshops are usually small, so the group can participate in the learning and interact with the presenters.Please indicate the length needed for the workshop. These sessions often have one or two presenters.

Debate: A debate is a regulated discussion of an issue with two matched sides. Debates have one moderator, two or more panelists, and no commentators.

Single Paper: Single paper proposals include a paper that the presenter would like the program committee to join with other single paper proposals or small sessions. The committee can only place single papers if other papers pair well to create a complete session. We encourage you to utilize the OAH Online Member Directory  or use the NEW: OAH Crossroads to connect with other historians in your field to construct a full proposal for consideration. 

Chat Seminar: 45-minute seminars that encourage discussion, debate, and conversation about topics trending in the field of American history. Each chat is led by 1-2 moderators who are not content providers, but instead direct and guide the conversation. Chats take place over the lunch period on the Saturday of the conference only. Chats include one or two moderators, and no commentators, panelists, or presenters.

Film Screening: Film screenings usually show all or a portion of a film and include a question-and-answer segment with the filmmaker and producers. Film screenings have a chair and one or more panelists.

Advance Text Session: Substantial papers are offered online three weeks prior to the convention to be discussed in detail during the meeting. These sessions include a chair, the paper author who will make introductory comments for 5 minutes only, and one or more commentators, with a minimum of 45 minutes reserved for audience discussion.

Posted: December 20, 2017
Tagged: Calls for Papers


OAH Receives Mellon Grant for 2018 Annual Meeting

The Organization of American Historians recently received a two-year, $150,000 grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to increase the reach of the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting.

Read more about the grant and the changes to the 2018 OAH Annual Meeting here.

Read More>>

Read more >

Posted: February 17, 2017
Tagged: News of the Organization, Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia